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Full text of "Motion Picture Magazine (Feb-Jul 1917)"

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AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at 77k- LIBRARY of CONGRESS 



Packard Campus 
for Audio Visual Conservation 
www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 



Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 



/\ 



! 



FEBRUARY 



I 



14 



FREE 
MINTING OF 

B. WARNED 

H THIS ISSUE 

SEE PAGE 171 










-'■< 



'w V^ MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




This intensely human picture 
stands for all that is best in music 



It is a picture with a message — a 
living message of absolute fidelity. 

"His Master's Voice" is insepa- 
rably associated with the highest 
attainments in the musical art; 
with the exquisite renditions of the 
world's Greatest artists; with the 
world's best music in the home. 

It is the exclusive trademark of 
the Victor Company. It identifies 
every genuine Victrola and Victor 
Record. 

There are Victor dealers everywhere, and 
they will gladly demonstrate the different styles 
of the Victor and Victrola— $10 to $400— and 
play any music you wish to hear. 

Victor Talking Machine Co., Camden, N. J., USA. 

Berliner Gramophone Co , Montreal Canadian Distributor; 

Important warning. Victor Records can be safely and 

satisfactorily played only with Victor Needles or Tungs- 

tone Stylus on Victors or Victrolas. Victor Records 

cannot be safely played on machines with jeweled or 

other reproducing points. 

New Victor Records demonstrated at 

all dealers on the 28th of each month 

Victrola 



a 




When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



Why Some Foods Explode 
in the Stomach 

By WILLIAM ELDRIDGE 



T 



people eat three times a day inflict 
nothing less than a crime against 
their health and are the direct cause of 90% 
of all sickness." 

This is the rather startling statement of 
Eugene Christian, the famous New York 
Food Scientist whose wonderful system of 
corrective eating is receiving so much eager 
attention throughout the Nation at the pres- 
ent time. 

According to Eugene Christian we eat 
without any thought of the relation which 
one food has to another when eaten at the 
same time. The result is that often we 
combine two foods each of great value in 
itself but which when combined in the 
stomach literally explode, liberating toxics 
which are absorbed by the blood and form 
the root of nearly all sickness, the first in- 
dications of which are acidity, fermentation, 
gas, constipation, and many other sympa- 
thetic ills leading to most serious conse- 
quences. 

According to Christian, all of this can be 
avoided if we would only pay a little atten- 
tion to the selection of our daily menus in- 
stead of eating without any regard for the 
consequences. 

This does not mean that it is necessary to 
eat foods we don't like ; instead Christian 
prescribes meals which are twice as deli- 
cious as those to which we are accustomed. 
Neither does he suggest proprietary or pat- 
ented foods — he simply tells us which foods 
when eaten together produce health and 
energy by removing the cause of sickness. 

Not long ago I was fortunate enough to 
be present when Eugene Christian was re- 
lating some of his experiences with cor- 
rective eating to a group of men interested 
in dietetics, and I was literally amazed at 
what he accomplished with food alone and 
without driisrs or medicines of anv kind. 



One case which sticks in my mind was 
that of a mother and daughter who went to 
him for treatment. The mother was forty 
pounds overweight and her physician diag- 
nosed her case as Bright's Disease. She had 
a sluggish liver, low blood pressure and 
lacked vitality. The daughter had an ex- 
treme case of stomach acidity and intestinal 
fermentation, was extremely nervous, had 
chronic constipation, and was 30 pounds 
underweight. 

Christian prescribed the proper food com- 
binations for each. Within a few weeks all 
symptoms had disappeared, and within three 
months the mother had lost 33 pounds and 
the daughter had gained 26 pounds, and 
both were in perfect health — normal in 
every particular. 

Another case which interested me greatly 
was that of a young man whose efficiency 
had been practically wrecked through stom- 
ach acidity, fermentation and constipation 
resulting in physical sluggishness which 
was naturally reflected in his ability to use 
his mind. He was twenty pounds under- 
weight when he first went to see Christian 
and was so nervous he couldn't sleep. Stom- 
ach and intestinal gases were so severe that 
they caused irregular heart action and often 
fits of great mental depression. As Chris- 
tian describes it he was not 50% efficient 
either mentally or physically. Yet in a few 
days, by following Dr. Christian's sugges- 
tions as to food, his constipation had com- 
pletely gone, although he had formerly been 
in the habit of taking large daily doses of 
a strong cathartic. In five weeks every 
abnormal symptom had disappeared — his 
weight having increased 6 pounds. In addi- 
tion to this he acquired a store of physical 
and mental energy so great in comparison 
with his former self as to almost belie the 
fact that it was the same man. 

But perhaps the most interesting case that 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



Christian told me of was that of a multi- 
millionaire — -a man 70 years old who had 
been traveling with his doctor for several 
years in a search for health. He was ex- 
tremely emaciated, had chronic constipation, 
lumbago and rheumatism. For over twenty 
years he had suffered with stomach and in- 
testinal trouble which in reality was super- 
aciduous secretions in the stomach. The 
first menus given him were designed to re- 
move the causes of acidity, which was 
accomplished in about thirty days. And 
after this was done he seemed to undergo a 
complete rejuvenation. His eyesight, hear- 
ing, taste and all of his mental faculties 
became keener and more alert. He had had 
no organic trouble — but he was starving to 
death from malnutrition and decomposition 
— all caused by the wrong selection and 
combination of foods. After six months' 
treatment this man was as well and strong 
as he had ever been in his life. 

These instances of the efficacy of right 
eating I have simply chosen at random from 
perhaps a dozen Eugene Christian told me 
of, every one of which was fully as inter- 
esting and they applied to as many differ- 
ent ailments. Surely this man Christian is 
doing a great work. 

I know of several instances where rich 
men and women have been so pleased with 
what he has done for them that they have 
sent him checks for $500 to $1,000 in addi- 
tion to the amount of the bill when paying 
him. 

There have been so many inquiries from 
all parts of the United States from people 
seeking the benefit of Eugene Christian's 
advice and whose cases he is unable to han- 
dle personally that he has written a little 
course of lessons which tells you exactly 
what to eat for health, strength and effi- 
ciency. This course is published by The 
Corrective Eating Society of New York. 



These lessons, there are 24 of them, con- 
tain actual menus for breakfast, luncheon 
and dinner, curative as well as corrective, 
covering every condition of health and sick- 
ness from infancy to old age and for all 
occupations, climates and seasons. 

Reasons are given for every recommen- 
dation based upon actual results secured in 
the author's many years 'of practice, 
although technical terms have been avoided. 
Every point is explained so clearly that 
there can be no possible misunderstanding. 

With these lessons at hand it is just as 
though you were in personal contact with 
the great food specialist because every pos- 
sible point is so thoroughly covered that 
you can scarcely think of a question which 
isn't answered. You can start eating the 
very things that will produce the increased 
physical and mental energy you are seeking 
the day you receive the lessons and you will 
find that you secure results with the first 
meal. 

If you would like to examine these 24 
Little Lessons in Corrective Eating simply 
write The Corrective Eating Society, Dept. 
282, 460 Fourth Ave., New York City. It 
is not necessary to enclose any money with 
your request. Merely ask them to send the 
lessons on five days' trial with the under- 
standing that you will either return them 
within that time or remit $3.00, the small 
fee asked. 

The reason that the Society is willing to 
send the lessons on free examination with- 
out money in advance is because they want 
to remove every obstacle to putting this 
knowledge in the hands of the many inter- 
ested people as soon as possible, knowing 
full well that a test of some of the menus in 
the lessons themselves are more convincing 
than anything that can possibly be said 
about them. 



Please clip out and mail the following form instead of 
writing a letter, as this is a copy of the official blank 
adopted by the Society and will be honored at once 



CORRECTIVE EATING SOCIETY, 

Dept. 282, 460 Fourth Avenue, New York City 

You may send mc prepaid a copy of Corrective Eating in 24 Lessons. I will either r email them 
to you within five days after receipt or send you $3. 



Name. 
City.. 



Address, 
State... 



When answering: ad'' 



■meiits kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



^-OPPORTUNITY MARKET 



IttETHINC OF INTEREST FOR EVERYBODY 

- - - 




___...._...._... 




AGENTS WANTED 


MALE HELP WANTED 


WE START YOU IN BUSINESS, furnishing everything; 
men and women, $30 to $200 weekly operating our "New 
System Specialty Candy Factories" "home or small room 
anywhere; no canvassing. Opportunity lifetime; booklet 
free. RAGSDALE CO., Drawer 91, East Orange, N. J. 


GOVERNMENT POSITIONS IM.Y BIG MONEY. 

Examinations everywhere soon. Get prepared by former United 
States Civil Service Examiner. 64 page booklet free. Write to- 
day. Patterson Civil Service School, Box 1408, Rochester, N.Y. 

WE PAY $80 MONTHLY SALARY and furnish rig 
and expenses to introduce guaranteed poultry and 
stock powders. BIGLER COMPANY, X-351, Spring- 
field, 111. 


Agents— 500 Per Cent. Profit. Free Sample Gold and Silver Sign 
Letters for store fronts and office windows. Anyone can put 
on. Big demand everywhere. Write today for liberal offer to 
agents. Metallic Letter Co. , 405 N. Clark St., Chicago, U. S. A. 


Men — Women Wanted. $100 month. Government jobs. 
Vacancies constantly. Write immediately for list 
positions obtainable. Franklin Institute, Dep't S-119, 
Rochester, N. Y. 


AGENTS MAKE BIG MONEY. 

Fast office seller; fine profits; particulars and sample 
free. One Dip Pen Co., 10 Daily Record Bldg., Balti- 


more, Md. 


Learn Theatrical Scene Painting at home during your 
spare time. M. P. Shows and Theaters being built 
everywhere and they all need scenery. Great future. 
Send for our Free Catalog. Natl. Comni. Art School, 
Dept. 6, Omaha, Neb. 

LEARN TO BE A DETECTIVE — Travel over the world; 
earn large salary and expenses. Write today for free 
illustrated booklet. NATIONAL SCHOOL OF DE- 
TECTIVES, 506 Depew Bldg., Fifth Avenue, New York. 


AGENTS — 200 PER CENT PROFIT. Wonderful little 
article. Something new; sells like wildfire. Carry right 
in pocket. Write at once for free sample. E. M. Felt- 
man, Sales Mgr., 9533 3rd St., Cincinnati, O. 


AGENTS — Sell "Zanol" Concentrated Extracts for mak- 
ing Liquors at Home. A few minutes does the work. 
Saves over 50 per cent. Guaranteed Strictly Legitimate. 
Small package. Enormous demand; sells fast; coins 
yon money. Send postal today. Ask for free sample. 
Universal Import Co., 5560 3rd St., Cincinnati, O. 


FEMALE HELP WANTED 






HELP WANTED 


FIVE BRIGHT, CAPABLE LADIES to travel, demon- 
strate and sell dealers. $25 to $50 per week. Rail- 
road fare paid. Goodrich Drug Company, Dept. 60, 
Omaha, Neb. 


Thousands Men and Women, 18 or over, wanted for 
U. S. Government Life Jobs. Thousands 1917 Vacancies. 
$75.00 month. Steady Work. Short hours. Rapid ad- 
vancement. Common education sufficient. Write im- 
mediately for list of positions easily obtainable. Frank- 
lin Institute, Dep't S-119, Rochester, N. Y. 


LADIES TO SEW at home for a large Phila. firm; good 
pay; steady work; no canvassing; send stamped en- 
velope for prices paid. UNIVERSAL CO., Dept. 45, 
Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 


WEDDING INVITATIONS 


MAN OR WOMAN TO TRAVEL FOR OLD-ESTAB- 
LISHED FIRM. No canvassing; $1170 first year, pay- 
able weekly, pursuant to contract. Expenses advanced. 
T. G. Nichols, Philadelphia, Pa., Pepper Bldg. 


Wedding Invitations, Announcements, etc., 100 in Script 
lettering, including inside and outside envelopes, $2.50; 
100 Visiting Cards, 50 cents. Write for Samples. 




M. Ott Engraving Co., 1009 Chestnut St., Phila., Pa. 


MOVING PICTURE BUSINESS 


SONG WRITERS 


$35.00 PROFIT NIGHTLY. Small capital starts you. 

No experience needed. We teach you the business. 
Catalog Free. ATLAS MOVING PICTURE CO., Dept. 
M., 525 South Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 




Songwriters "Key to Success" Sent Free. This valuable 
booklet contains the real facts. We revise poems, com- 
pose and arrange music, secure copyright and facilitate 
free publication or outright sale. Start right. Send us 


PHOTOPLAY TEXT BOOKS 


some of your work to-day for free examination. 
Knickerbocker Studios, 126 Gaiety Building, N. Y. City. 


How to Write a Photoplay, by C. G. Winkopp, 1342 
Prospect Ave., Bronx, N. Y. C. Price, 25 cents. Con- 
tains model scenario, "Where to Sell," "How to Build 
Plots," "Where to Get Plots." 


SONGWRITERS, we revise poems, compose and ar- 
range music. Submit poems for examination. Write 
for B. & O. JAS. E. CLARE, INC., Schank St., bet. 
92d & 93d, Canarsie, Brooklyn,. N. Y. 


"Scenario Technic," 10c. coin. SHOWS you how to put 
your plot in scenario form. Original 50-scene photo- 


NEWS CORRESPONDENTS 


play, writing and selling instructions, list of buyers. 
Doty Co., Bliss Bldg., R. 55, Washington, D. C. 


EARN $25 WEEKLY, spare time, writing for news- 
papers, magazines. Experience unnecessary; details 
free. Press Syndicate, 457 St. Louis, Mo. 




TYPEWRITERS , 


GAMES AND ENTERTAINMENTS 






TYPEWRITERS, all makes, factory rebuilt by famous 
"Young Process." As good as new, look like new, 
wear like new, guaranteed like new. Our big business 
permits lowest cash prices, $10 and up. Also, machines 
rented — or sold on time. No matter what your needs 


PLAYS, Vaudeville Sketches, Monologues, Dialogues, 
Speakers, Minstrel Material, Jokes, Recitations, Tab- 
leaux, Drills, Entertainments. Make Up Goods. Large 
Catalog Free. T. S. Denison & Co., Dept. 62, Chicago. 


are we can best serve you. Write and see — now. 
Young Typewriter Company, Dept. 1077, Chicago. 


STORIES WANTED 


Send for List No. 1 of Typewriter Bargains — new and 
rebuilt. Cash, time or rent. TEN DAYS' TRIAL. 
AMERICAN TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE, 14 North 
Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 


WANTED — Stories, articles, poems for new magazine. 
We pay on acceptance. Hand-written MSS. acceptable. 
Submit MSS. to Cosmos Magazine, 1040 Stewart Bldg., 
Washington, D. C. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOT t ,Oj> PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



T5he OPPORTUNITY MARKET 



PATENTS 



WANTED IDEAS — Write for List of Inventions Wanted 
by manufacturers and prizes offered for inventions. Our 
four books sent free. Send sketch for free opinion. 
Victor J. EvaHS & Co., 833 Ninth, Washington, D. C. 

Patent Tour Ideas — $9,000 offered for certain inven- 
tions. Books, "How to Obtain a Patent" and "What 
to Invent," sent free. Send rough sketch for free 
report as to patentability. Manufacturers constantly- 
writing us for patents we have obtained. We advertise 
your patent for sale at our expense. Established 20 
years. Address, Chandlee & Chandlee, patent attor- 
neys, 989 F St., Washington, D. C. 

INVENT SOMETHING. It may bring wealth. Free 
book tells what to invent and how to obtain a patent 
through our Credit System. Waters & Co., Succeeded 
by Talbert & Parker, 4100 Warder Bldg , Washington, 
D. C. 

PATENTS THAT PROTECT AND PAY. Books and 
advice Free. Highest references. Best results. Pnmnt- 
ness assured. WATSON E. COLEMAN, 624 F Street, 
Washington, D. C. 

IDEAS WANTED — Manufacturers are writing for pat- 
ents procured through me. Three books with list 
hundreds of inventions wanted sent free. I help you 
market your invention. Advice Free. R. B. OWEN, 
121 Owen Bldg., Washington. D. C. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING PLANTS 



ELECTRIC Theatre, Home, Farm & Store Light Plants: 
Fans; Power Motors; Lights; Dynamos; Engines; 
Belts; Bells; Books; Storage & Medical Batteries; 
Rectifiers; Telephones; Bicycle, Carriage, Fishing & 
Flash Lights; Massage, Ozone & M. P. Machines. 
Motion Picture Theatre Complete Equipments for 
Permanent and Traveling SHOWS. Write Now. 
Catalog 3 cts. OHIO ELECTRIC WORKS, Cleveland, O. 



FOR THE LAME 



THE PERFECTION EXTENSION SHCfE for any person 
with one short limb. No more unsightly cork soles, irons, 
etc., needed. Worn with ready-made shoes. Shipped on trial. 
Write for booklet. IIexry O. Lotz, 313 Third Ave., New York. 



COINS, STAMPS, ETC. 



|$-OLD COINS WANTED— S$— $4.25 each paid for 
U. S. Flying Eagle Cents dated 1856. $2 to $600 paid 
for hundreds of old coins dated before 1S95. Send TEN 
cents at once for New Illustrated Coin Value Book, 
4x7. Get posted — it may mean your good fortune. 
C. F. CLARKE & CO., Coin Dealers, Box 99, Le Roy, N.Y. 

CASH PAID for cancelled postage stamps. I buy 
the common 1 and 2c stamps Parcel Post, and 3, 4, 
6, 6, 8, 10c Special Delivery and other kinds. Send 10c. 
for Price List. Yes, I buy coins also. A. SCOTT, 
Cohoes, N. Y. 

CASH PAID FOR OLD MONEY OF ALL KINDS: 

$5.00 for certain eagle cents; $7.00 for certain 1853 
Quarters, etc. Send 4c. Get Large Illustrated Coin 
Circular. May mean your large profit. Send now. 
NUMISMATIC BANK, Dept. 48, Fort Worth, Texas. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



Investors' Magazine Free to You. $10 invested with us 
has made others $300 in few months. Our magazine, 
"Hoffman's Investment Journal," tells how this was 
done. This magazine gives facts about the real earn- 
ing power of money. Tells how many have started on 
the road to fortune. To introduce it we will send three 
months FREE. If you want to make money, write to- 
day saying, "Send your magazine." Hoffman Trust 
Company, 339 Kress Building, Houston, Texas. 



PHOTOPLAYS 



AUTHORS! Let us sell your new or rejected photo- 
plays or photoplay ideas in either scenario, synopsis or 
story form, either hand-written or typewritten. We 
revise if needed, and submit to every film company in 
the United States that buys photoplay scenarios. We 
deduct 10% of sales price if sold. Send us your photo- 
plays. No expense to author unless deal made. Na- 
tional Photoplay Sales Co., Box 422, Des Moines, la. 

$25 CONTEST. We will pay $25 for best name for un- 
named photoplay plot submitted before April 1. Send 
5c. for copy. No expense. We buy good plots; any 
form. Enclose return postage witn plots. Midland 
Motion Picture Co., Box 469, Des Moine*. la. 

WRITE PHOTOPLAYS IN SPARE TIME AND EARN 
MONEi'. Try It. Big Prices Paid; Constant Demand; 
No Correspondence Course; Details Free. Giese Co., 
289 Whiteman St.. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Send Me Your Idea for a Photoplay. Submit in any 

form. I will put your idea in correct photoplay form, 

, typewrite and help you sell. Send idea or write for de- 

1 tans. H. L. Hursk, 123 Sc Third St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 

of best books on writing and selling photoplays, short 
stories, poems. 

Atlas Publishing Co., 895, Cincinnati. 

Wanted — Your ideas for Photoplays, Stories, Etc.! We 
will accept them in any form — correct free — sell on 
Commission. Big Rewards! Make money. Get full 
details now! Writer's Selling Service, 2 Main, Auburn, 
N. Y. 

Scenarios. Manuscripts Typed, 10 Cents Page. In- 
cluding carbon. Marjorie Homer Jones, 322 Monad- 
nock Block, Chicago. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ST-STU-T-T-TERING AND STAMMERING cured at 
home. Instructive booklet free. Walter McDonnell, 
Room 48, 817 Fifteenth St., N. W., Washington, 
D. C. 

INVENT SOMETHING. It may bring wealth. Free 
book tells what to invent and how to obtain a patent 
through our Credit System. Waters & Co., Succeeded 
by Talbert & Parker, 4100 Warder Bldg., Washington, 
D. C. 



Fourth Edition of "The Hair," its anatomy, diseases 
and treatment (EMMS), by Dr. Achershaug (Norway). 
SWORN AFFIDAVITS and physicians' endorsements. 
Copy free for postage (8c.) Achershaug, 246-M Man- 
hattan Ave., New York City. 



REAL ESTATE 

Mississippi 
IS HE CRAZY? The owner of a plantation in Mis- 
sissippi is giving away a few five-acre tracts. The 
only condition is that figs be planted. The owner 
wants enough figs raised to supply a Canning Factory. 
You can secure five acres and an interest in the Fac- 
tory by writing Eubank Farms Company, 939 Key- 
stone, Pittsburgh, Pa. They will plant and care for 
your trees for $6 per month. Your profit should be 
$1,000 per year. Some think this man is crazy for 
giving away such valuable land, but there may be 
method in his madness. 



POULTRY 



POULTRY PAPER, 44-124 page periodical, up to date, 
tells all you want to know about care and manage- 
ment of poultry, for pleasure or profit; four months for 
10 cents. Poultry Advocate, Dept. 232, Syracuse, N. Y. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




©ACTING 



DRAMA- ORATORY- OPERA*™ SINGING 

STAGE*™ CLASSIC nANCING~»MUSICAL COMEDY 

ALSO MOTION PICTURE ACTING 

Courses forming [20th year], Beginners and Advanced 
students accepted. Agents and Managers supplied. [Pro- 
ducing and Booking.] Write for information [mention 
study desired] and Illustrated Catalogue, how thousands 
of celebrated Actors and Actresses [late graduates] sue- 



DRAMATIC 
SCHOOLS 



Secretary of Alviene Schools, Suite 3, 57th St. & B'dway, Entrance 225 W. 57th St., N. Y. 




B E 



A "CAMERA MAM' 

and Earn $40 to $100 Weekly ll 



"The Camera Man" is one of the hest paid 
men in the"Movie" business, actors included. 
He travels all over t he world at the company's 
expense. Complete Course in 1 to 3 months. 
Write for Catalog M 

New York Institute of Photography 

Photography taught in all its branchea 
22 W. 23d Street, New York. E. BRUNEI., Director 



CORNET FREE! 




3 



We teach you to play by 

mail and will give you a 

— — — — — — — — — — — Beautiful Cornet or 

any Brass Band Instrument absolutely I'BEK, Yon pay 
weekly as lessons are taken. Instrument is sent with first 
lesson. Graduates in every state. Hundreds 
of enthusiastic- testimonials. Write to-day 
for our booklet and wonderful tuition offer. 
INTERNATIONAL CORNET SCHOOL 
625 Federal Street. Boston, Mass. 



BOOK OF GOV'T JOBS 

Tells how American Citizens 18 or over can qualify for D. 8, 

positions paying: $75 to $150 monthly to begC 

unlimited possibilities for advancement. 

Easy work. Short hours. Sure vacations 

with full pay. No strikes. Lifetime 

positions. Ordinary education sufficient. 

WRITE ! Don't be content with poor- 
paying, uncertain job when Uncle Sam 
offers you steady, well paying position in 
Railway Mail Service, Post Office, Custom 
House or at Panama Canal. Let former U. 
S. Civil Service Sec'y-Examiner prepare 
you for examination. Write for beautiful 
book. — Fr»e. Patterson Civil Service 
School, 122 News Bldg., Rochester, N. Y. 



SHORT-STORY WRITING 

A course of forty lessons in the history, form, structure and 

writing of the Short-Story taught by Dr. J. Berg Esenwein, for 

yearsEditor of Lippincott's. 250-p. catalog free. Please address 

The Home Correspondence School 

I>ept. HI, Springfield, Mass. 



E A BANKER 

Prepare by mail for this high profession, in which there an <rrant 



— z£*FP Profession, in which there are great 

opportunities. Six months' term. Diploma awarded. Send for free 

book. How to Become a Banker. '' EDGAR G ALGORN Pr fi <f 

AMERICAN SCHOOL OF BANKING' ' 

453 East State Street. COLUMBUS, OHIO 






LEARN NURSING AT HOME 

Complete training in general, medical, 
obstetrical, gynecological and surgical 
nursing. Instruction by physicians and 
graduate nurses. 20 years' experience. 
Affiliated with The Central Hospital of 
Thiladelphia. Send for free books to 
Miss Frazier, Superintendent Phila- 
delphia School for Nurses, . 2247 
Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 




ILearn Piano ItiNiNB At HomeS; 



A LUCRATIVE .PROFESSION EASII.Y ACQUIRED — 

spare-hour study. Clear instructions. No doubt or 
guess-work. Anyone can learn. Our Patented 
Tune-a-Phone Method makes success more cer- 
tain than best oral instruction. Guaranteed. Di- 
ploma to graduates. Write for FREE BOOKLET, 
telling how our Students Make Big Money. 
Niles Bryant School of Piano Tuning, 1 7 Inst. Bldg. 



Battle Creek, 



MUSIC LESSONS FREE 

* 9ou can Ktad THuaa* tMtihu quiift&j 
At Your Home. Write today for our booklet. It tella 
how to learn to play Piano, Organ, Violin, Mandolin, 
Guitar, Banjo, etc. Beginners or advanced pupils. 

AMERICAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC. 69 Lakeside Bldg..Chica«o 



COPY THIS SKETCH 

and let me see what you can do w ; th it. Illustrators 
and cartoonists earn from $20 to $125 a week or 
more. My practical system of personal individual 
lessons by mail will develop your talent. Fifteen 
years' sueoesstul work for newspapers and maga- 
zines qualifies me to teach you. 

Send me your sketch of President Wilson with 6c 
in stamps and I will send you a test les-on plate, also C~ 
collection of drawings showing possibilities for YOU. 

THE LANDON SCHOOL 2* nd g-8S!B 

1402 Schofield Building, Cleveland, O. 




STUDENTS 




ART 



MAGAZIN 



Publishes Cash 
Assign- 
ments, lessons and art- 
icles on Cartooning:, Il- 
lustrating:, Lettering:, 
Designing: and Chalk- 
Talking: Criticises ama- 
teurs' work Interesting. 
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PHOTOPLAY REVIEWS 

"Sister of Six" (Griffith-Triangle).— Bessie 
Love and the six "Fine-Arts Kiddies," all 
gathered under one roof — a bullet-ridden one 
at times — emphasize "little-mother" love by 
multiplying it by six. In the midst of attack 
and slaughter, hate and gun-play, the way 
winsome Bessie frisks around and protects 
her brood of little brothers and sisters wins 
the hardest spinster-heart. The script, a tale 
or California in the 'sixties, is carelessly 
put together — inconsistency follows incon- 
gruity, and anachronisms of weaponry (breech- 
loading rifles) are rife. But we forgive 
these things, even if they do jolt the discrim- 
inatingo The story is picturesque, quaint, 
red-blooded — and then there is the "Sister of 
Six," such a worrisome, winsome, wise 
"little mother." E= M. L. 

"Jim Grimsby's Boy" (Ince-Triangle). — A 
two-gun, cantankerous miner whose dying- 
wife bequeaths him a baby giri, and who 
will have nothing but a "he-un," is the key- 
note of this clever drama. So the girl is 
made to wear pants and to believe herself a 
boy. But her awakening comes — and with 
it "big business." Frank Keenan, as Jim 
Grimsby; Enid Markey, as "Bill," and Waldo 
Whittier, as the tenderfoot sheriff, interpret 
their roles so well that a slender, whimsical 
plot holds our interest firmly thru its course 
— it is its homey and homely touches that 
count. E. M. L. 

"The Scarlet Runner" (Vitagraph).- — Any 
play that brings Earle Williams before us 
each week is welcomed with open arms. 
Aside from that, the episodes, each being 
complete, are in themselves interesting, and 
the environment well carried out. The only 
trouble is that we know, the moment the plot 
difficulty is revealed, that Mr. Williams, in 
his role of supervisor of troubles, will make 
everything end happily. H. S. N. 

"An Enemy to the King" (Vitagraph). — 
The second of the series of photoplays fea- 
turing E. H. Sothern and a great improve- 
ment over the first. There is little fault to 
find with Mr. Sothern's second attempt and 
he is supported by a cast that has seldom 
been equaled by any company, including 
Edith Storey, Mildred Manning, Brinsley 
Shaw, Rowland Buckston and several who 
are not so well known to the screen, but 
whose work compares favorably with the 
best. The play is full of interest from 
start to finish, and, even without the name 
and prestige of one of the foremost actors 
of our time, it would probably take rank 
among the best of the year on account of 
its splendid acting, picturesqueness and gen- 
eral appeal, J. 

"The Rose of the South" (Vitagraph).— 
A story within a story, yet a very convinc- 
ing one. Antonio Moreno, as a dashing Con- 
federate officer, adds considerably to his 
laurels and does one of the finest pieces of 
work in his career. Gordon Gray, as the 
rival officer, also does nicely, and so does 
Arthur Cozine in a congenial part. Peggy 




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Hyland is the star and is at times quite 
winsome and charming, and Rose Tapley 
as her mother, and all the others in the 
fine cast do well, not forgetting Charles Kent 
who tells the story. All in all, this play is 
well ahove the average feature photoplay. 
It should prove a winner. J. 

"The Devil's Double" (Ince-Triangle). — 
William S. Hart has given us another study 
of a man's inner passions. The gambler and 
town bad-man who tries to remake himself 
under a woman's influence (very detached, 
as she is another man's wife and insists on 
staying so) gives Hart a big chance to 
wrestle mightily with both his good angel 
and his personal devil. This baring of his 
confessional to his audience is superbly 
done. The plot treads the danger-line of 
"boiler-plate" in many places, such as the 
bandits' drawing of cards for possession 
of the woman (Enid Markey) and the con- 
venient knocking in and out of her memory. 

E. M. L. 

"The Matrimaniac" (Ince-Triangle). — If 
there ever was a mad lover, Douglas Fair- 
banks is the prince of "looney" spooners in 
his latest farce-comedy. The plot, a frenzied 
and frustrated elopement, speeds like the ex- 
press-train it is played upon. Fairbanks' 
stunts are real thrillers. E. M. L. 

"Less Than the Dust" (Artcraft).— Mary 
Pickford's own release. In this picture 
"Little Mary" neither progresses nor retro- 
gresses. Assuming the character cf a young 
East Indian girl who, upon discovering she is 
of English parentage, transplants herself to 
England, Mary Pickford has plenty of op- 
portunities for comedy work mingled with 
pathetic touches that her admirers always 
enjoy. The settings are good, and David 
Powell was excellent. H. S. N. 

"Miss George Washington" (Famous Play- 
ers). — A delightful comedy replete With 
amusing situations. Marguerite Clark is 
irresistible as a boarding-school girl whr 
fibs herself into and out of all kinds cf diffi 
culties. She is ably assisted by Niies Welch. 
The direction could not be excelled, and the 
whole production is most pleasing. 

II. S. N. 

"The Chaperon" (Essanay). — A screenic 
version from the play by Clyde Fitch. Not 
quite so strong a play as Edna Mayo can do 
so well, but perhaps all the more entertain- 
ing for its very frothiness. It will interest 
you to see Miss Mayo swim from a sinking 
canoe in her Lucille frock, and thereafter 
forget to be "pretty" and to play her part 
most naturally — wind-blown hair, disheveled 
gown, chattering teeth, and temper — while 
Eugene O'Brien, manlike, laughs at her 
predicament. H. S. N. 

"The Shielding Shadow" (Pathe). — A 
melodramatically exciting serial, each of 
whose chapters leaves one with a burning 
curiosity to see the next instalment. Grace 
Darmond is the scintillating star, and she 
is mighty good to lock upen. II. S. N. 

"The Bright Lights" (Keystone). — A Key- 
stone above par. A country cabaret is the 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



11 



setting for the clever foolery of Roscoe Ar- 
buckle, Mabel Normand and Al. St. John. 

H. S. N. 

"The Honorable Algy" (Ince-Triangle). — 
A neat picture, clever story, finely produced. 
The spontaneity and habitual charm of 
Charles Ray lift it into the worth-while 
class. But the feminine portions of the pro- 
duction, in spite of their beautiful clothes, 
wont stir a single one of your slumbering 
red corpuscles. H. S. N. 

"The Heart of a Hero" (World).— A dra- 
matic picturization of the history of Nathan 
Hale. Throbbing with tense situations, well 
carried out atmosphere and costuming, with 
Robert Warwick and beauteous Gail Kane 
in the leading roles, it is a deservedly popu- 
lar success. H. S. N. 

"Somewhere in France" (Ince-Triangle). 
— Here is a Paris you would stake your oath 
was Paris and not a studio. The direction 
and photography are unusually good. The 
plot, taken from the story by Richard Hard- 
ing Davis, is most interesting. Louise 
Glaum and Howard Hickman are indeed 
capable in the leading roles. H. S. N. 

"The Knight of the Bath-tub" (Universal). 
— A comedy featuring Eddie Lyons and Lee 
Moran; as comical as the funny picture page 
in a Sunday newspaper. H. S. N. 

"Jumps and Jealousy" (Greater Vita- 
graph). — Patsy De Forest and Hughey Mack 
in a hazardous Keystone imitation. 

H. S. N. 

"The Call cf the Unborn" (Universal).— 
A two-reeler with the old triangle plot. Re- 
markable for one reason — the feminine lead 
is taken by Edith Roberts, a passionately 
beautiful giri with a great deal of person- 
ality. H. S. N. 

"Love Never Dies" (Bluebird). — A love 
story of two genii which gives Ruth Stone- 
house an opportunity to exhibit her very 
charming dancing. H. S. N. 

"Atta Boy's Last Race" (Griffith-Triangle). 
— The horse was good and played his part 
naturally; that was about all. Old plot, with 
old situations. Dorothy Gish has very little 
opportunity. L. C. 

"Bought and Paid For" (World).— Fea- 
tures Alice Brady and is an exceptionally 
good medium for her. The photoplay was 
powerful, clear, and surpasses the stage pro- 
duction in many ways. The light touches of 
comedy thruout the play enhance Miss 
Brady's ability to always charm her audi- 
ence. L. C. 

"Eyes of Love" (Universal). — Leah Baird 
and Jack Mulhall in a worked-to-death plot. 
It's the old story of the lover who goes blind 
and the sweetheart who decides to shake 
him. To save his happiness, and also de- 
lude him into marrying the wrong girl, his 
sweetheart's sister steps up to the altar. 

L. C. 

"The Wager" (Metro). — Features Emily 
Stevens. A detective-mystery drama replete 
with powerful, dramatic situations. Emily 
Stevens, as "Diamond Daisy," carries the 
Story thru to a whipping finish. L. C. 



Dont Miss the MARCH Number! 

So many good things have been scheduled for 
the March issue of the Motion Picture Maga- 
zine that it should easily be, as usual, "the 
best yet." Here are just a few: 
"Our Valentine," 
By Jack Gallagher. 
This is a very funny drawing of Charlie Chap- 
lin, the famous comedian, and it will be printed 
in colors. Since this magazine comes out on 
Feb. 1st, it will be in time for St. Valentine's 
Day. You will surely want to cut this picture 
out and mail it as a valentine. This picture 
will take the place of the painting that us- 
ually appears on the third inside cover, but the 
painting on the front cover by Sielke will ap- 
pear as usual. 

"What Their Handwriting Portrays," 
By Fritzi Remont. 
We have given our readers a taste of palmis- 
try and astrology, and now comes a little more 
insight into the characters of leading picture 
artists in the form of character readings by 
means of their handwriting. The first group 
of the series will include William Hart, Violet 
Mersereau Blanche Sweet, Henry B. Walthall, 
and William Garwood. 

"The Lannigans and Brannigans," 

By James G. Gable. 

The famous Irish characters created by Mr. 

Gable are back again and their discussions of 

current films are funnier than ever. 

"On Location with Harold L,ockwood and 
May Allison," 
By Bennie Zeidman. 
An interesting article describing the doings of 
these well-known stars while taking pictures on 
the historic coast of California. 
"With the Movie Folks at Home and Abroad," 

By Roberta Courtlandt. 
Miss Courtlandt has caught many leading play- 
ers in characteristic poses in this article and 
she throws some interesting side-lights on their 
work and play. 

"The Photodrama," 
By Henry Albert Phillips. 
This is the third article of the series on the 
art of photoplay writing, and contains many 
helpful suggestions from one who can well 
speak with authority. 

"How Helen Holmes Became Mrs. Ma«k and a 
Picture Star," 
By Pearl Gaddis 
A clever and romantic article on the marital ad- 
ventures of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. MacGowan. 
"A Child of Fortune," 
By Johnson Briscoe. 
A chat with Mae Murray by the able author 
of "Screen Stars and Their Stars," the next 
series of which will contain the horoscopes of 
Marguerite Snow and Charles Chaplin. 
"Billie Burke at Home," 
By Roberta Courtlandt. 
An intimate talk with the great star and a 
personally conducted tour of her beautiful home. 
"Falling — On and Off the Screen," 
By Robert Francis Moore. 
Which tells all about how the players manage 
to do so much tumbling and falling from high 
places without getting hurt. 

"Breaking Into the Movies in California," 
By Suzette Booth. 
A continuation of the graphic and truthful 
diary, part of which is published in this issue. 
Besides all this there are many other articles 
and features, not counting the regular depart- 
ments, all of which make us quite confident 
that we can still make you exclaim, when you 
see the beautiful March number: "Well, I 
didn't think they could do it, but they have, 
for this is indeed the best yet!" Place your 
order now with your newsdealer, and dont 
forget that you should have it on Thursday, 
Feb. 1. And just two weeks from that day 
(Feb. 15) you should see that you get the 
March Motion Picture Classic, which is by far 
the handsomest magazine on the stands, and it 
is only 15 cents a copy. 

MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 

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"The Last Man" (Vitagraph). — Features 
William Duncan and Mary Anderson. One 
of the best battle-scenes ever photographed. 
The scenery was of rare beauty, and William 
Duncan, as usual, did some very telling 
work. L. C. 

"Crosby's Rest-Cure" (Metro).— The Sid- 
ney Drews in another domestic jar with a 
kiss-and-make-up finish. Good comedy well 
rendered. L. C. 

"The Powder Trail" (Universal). — Grace 
Cunard and Francis Ford at their worst. 
The battle-scenes were a joke. All that could 
be seen were about a dozen foreign soldiers 
fighting against two hundred Americans, 
and the American flag never ceased to wave 
in front of the camera. The average audi- 
ence will take it as a comedy, or else be- 
deeply disappointed. No plot worth men- 
tioning. L. C. 

"The Madness of Helen," with Ethel 
Clayton and Carlyle Blackwell. A story 
with an unexpected ending. At times it 
runs along with a "flat tire," but. the end 
makes you sit up and take notice. Ethel 
Clayton plays a dual role, another undis- 
closed surprise until the last scene. L. C. 

"Big Tremaine" (Metro). — Features Har- 
old Lockwood and May Allison. Love, money 
and politics are the interwoven themes that 
make up this likable play. The Southern 
settings were beautiful and the acting of 
the leads most satisfactory. L. C. 

STAGE PLAYS THAT ARE WORTH WHILE 

(Readers in distant towns will do well to 

preserve this list for reference when these 

speaking plays appear in their vicinity.) 

, Playhouse. — "The Man Who Came Back." 
A strong, gripping drama that holds the 
interest from beginning to end; superbly 
acted by Henry Hull and Mary Nash. 

Century. — "The Century Girl." The big- 
gest musical show New York ever saw, and 
in its most beautiful theater. The talk of 
the town. 

Longacre. — "Nothing But the Truth." A 
clever farce which William Collier makes 
uproariously funny from curtain to curtain. 

Gaiety.— "Turn to the Right." One of the 
big hits of the season. Review later. 

Belasco. — "Seven Chances." A bashful 
young man has seven chances to marry and 
inherit $12,000,000. His efforts to get a wife 
are excruciatingly funny. An excellent cast, 
with Carroll McComas, makes this a bright 
farce well worth while. 

Hudson.— "Pollyanna." A glad play after 
the order of -'Daddy Long-legs," "Peg o' My 
Heart" and "The Cinderella Man"; intensely 
interesting and beautifully done. A big hit. 

Eltinge. — "Cheating Cheaters." A thrilling 
crook-play, full of suspense, surprises and a 
few good laughs. Marjorie Rambeau and 
entire company are fine. 

Punch and Judy. — "Treasure Island." If 
you like fairy stories (with fierce pirates as 
fairies) and the sea, and picturesque settings 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



13 



— including a real ship — and Stevenson's sea 
yarns, dont miss this elaborate production. 
It is exceedingly amusing. The young folks 
will be held spellbound, and the old folks 
will have a hearty laugh. It is handsomely 
and wonderfully done. 

Booth. — "Getting Married." A Bernard 
Shaw play that sparkles with wit and Shaw 
philosophy, capably played by an unusually 
strong cast which includes William Faver- 
sham, Henrietta Crosman, Charles Cherry 
and Hilda Spong. 

Cohan's. — "Come Out of the Kitchen." 
Ruth Chatterton is always charming, but 
her opportunities in this Southern play are 
net as winsome as those in "Daddy Long- 
legs," even with Bruce McRae to assist her. 

Lyric. — "A Daughter of the Gods." Fox's 
"Picture Beautiful" with Annette Kellermann 
as the star submersible and dancing Venus. 
A very elaborate spectacle. 

Liberty. — "Intolerance." David W. Grif- 
fith's gigantic film spectacle. ' Dazzling to 
the eye, but not as great as "The Birth of a 
Nation." 

Loew's N. Y. and Loew's American Roof. — 
Photoplays; first runs. Program changes 
every week. 

Rialto. — Photoplays supreme. Program 
changes every week. 

(For additional reviews, see the Motion 
Picture Classic, out Jan. 13.) 

PATTER FROM THE PACIFIC 

By MOSGROVE COL WELL 

Harold Lockwood, May Allison, Fred Bal- 
shofer and the other members of the Yorke- 
Metro Company have done considerable 
traveling during the taking of "Pidgin 
Island." They were at Monterey for two 
weeks, and spent some time in San 
Francisco. 

Frank Garbutt is a busy man these days. 
Aside from looking after his several busi- 
nesses and his millions, he spends much time 
at both the Morocco and the Famous Players- 
Lasky studios, and all sorts of things are 
happening at both places. The Famous 
Players-Lasky studios now occupy two full 
blocks; the next block is taken up by Pathe 
Lehrman and the Christie Comedy Company. 
Opposite are the L-Ko studios, and the special 
stages which are put aside for Ford and 
Miss Cunard. 

Jim Davis, who until recently directed the 
Kalem "Hazards of Helen" series, is now 
manager of the Vogue studios; and J. R. 
Crone, who was manager before him, has 
gone to the American, vice P. G. Lynch, whose 
future plans are not yet known. 

Herbert Rawlinson is hard at work again 
at Universal City, after being confined in 
the hospital for some time with a torn and 
twisted knee. He has to wear it bandaged 
up even yet, but was too anxious to get back 
to his work to lay off any longer. 

Another star has gone and formed a com- 
pany all her own. Cleo Madison is the 
party that Las just accomplished this feat. 



BWWAW bW ^W W 



WANTED! 

Send us YOUR IDEAS for Photoplays, Stories, 
Etc. ! They may bring BIG MONEY ! Rowland 
Thomas, an "unknown writer," won a $5,000 
prize. Elaine Sterne, another beginner, re- 
ceived $1,000 from the "Sun." 

You Have Ideas 

If you go to the movies, if you read maga- 
zines — then you know the kind of material 
editors want. Special education is NOT RE- 
QUIRED. Writing is open to ALL CLASSES. 
The Editor of AMERICAN MAGAZINE says: 
"The best reading matter Is as frequently ob- 
tained from absolutely new writers as It is 
from famous writers." EVERY life has its 
story! 

Your Ideas Taken in Any Form 

We will accept your ideas in ANY form — 
either as finished scripts or as mere outlines 
of plots. Send us your Bare Ideas. Outlines, 
Plots, Synopses or Finished Stories. 

Your Ideas Corrected Free 

If your work shows merit — but needs correction 
—we will completely REVISE and TYPEWRITE 
it FREE OF CHARGE! Then promptly submit 
to the Leading Film and Fiction Editors. All 
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deducted AFTER a sale Is made. 

This is TOUR OPPORTUNITY. So get 
busy! Send your manuscripts A T ONCE! 
WRITE TOD A T for FULL DETAILS! 

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Tells What Plots Are— Where to Get AH the Plots 
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Since the expiration of her contract with 
the Universal, Cleo has been acting regularly 
for the Cleo Madison Film Company, of 
which Izzy Bernstein and herself are the 
leading -lights. Bernstein has a lot to say 
about the big things they are going to do, 
but cant tell 'em all. 

Oscar Apfel, the veteran director, has 
joined the Yorke Film Corporation and will 
alternate with Jay Hunt in the directing of 
the Harold Lockwood and May Allison pic- 
tures. While Apfel is directing, Hunt is cut- 
ting his picture and preparing another, and 
vice versa. Great team-work this. Every- 
body's busy all the time. Harold and May 
dont even get Sundays to themselves any 
more. 

Bill Stowell received a present the other 
day. Doesn't know whether a friend or an 
enemy sent it to him. The present was a 
Boston bull with a very vicious nature. "It 
doesn't cost much to feed him," says Bill; 
"he'll eat anything!" The dog shows a 
strong likeness for Bill and sticks awfully 
close to him. So far he has managed to 
escape with a small piece torn from his coat. 

Charles Ray has received such wonderful 
notices and letters of congratulation from 
exhibitors and fans thruout the country for 
his work in "The Honorable Algy," in which 
he starred, that he feels very perky these 
days. When last seen he was talking in 
earnest terms with the sales-manager of the 
Stutz auto salesrooms and pointing to a 
blazing red five-passenger that was a beaut. 
Hope I get a ride. 

Chester Conklin, of the Keystone, is a busy 
little man these days. He has been work- 
ing so hard over at the Keystone plant that 
he has been neglecting his ranch shamefully. 
Ches is afraid that his animals wont recog- 
nize him when he gets back to the ranch 
again. 

Another big surprise. Dustin Farnum has 
left the Pallas Company and joined the Fox 
ranks. He will be starred in a new series of 
pictures that are being especially written to 
suit him. William Desmond Taylor has also 
joined Fox and will direct Dustin. Looks 
like a great combination. 

Lewis Jackson, a young auto-racer, was 
killed at Santa Monica, recently, in the 
Grand Prix race. He was formerly a chauf- 
feur for Grace Cunard, and she has done 
much to assist his widow since the unfortu- 
nate accident. Jackson's car left the track 
and killed a woman and L. B. Jenkins — a 
Keystone camera-man — as well as himself. 
. Henry King is acting again these days. 
He is appearing in the Balboa pictures with 
little Mary Sunshine, as well as directing. 
Busy boy, King. 

Hobart Henley is the busiest man on the 
Universal lot these days, with his directing, 
and acting as well.. He has been hoarse for 
three weeks now and hasn't stopped work 
long enough to get over it. One of the bene- 
fits of the movies — your voice doesn't in- 
terfere with your work. * 

{Continued on page 160) 



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15 



ADDITION PUZZLE 

Here's a new puzzle for our readers to 
rack their brains over on a win- 
ter's evening. It was suggested by 
M. K. Collins, of 41 Richmond Ave., Pitts- 
field, Mass. Every sentence represents 
the surname of a photoplayer. It speaks 
for itself, but, just to show you how it 
works, we will tell you that the answer to 
the first is "Bushman." We will give 
$25 in prizes for the best answers, and 
if more than one contestant guesses the 
entire thirty-five correctly, the prizes will 
go to the persons sending in the neatest 
and most artistic answers. The first prize 
will be $10, second prize $5, third prize 
$3, fourth prize $2, and five prizes of $1 
each. Name and address must be on every 
set of answers. The contest will close on 
March 1, 1917, at noon. Address Addition 
Puzzle, 175 Duffield Street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

1. A shrub plus a human being. 

2. A tool plus an "auto." 

3. A nobleman plus a vowel. 

4. A bolt plus a fuel. 

5. Soft earth plus 2000 pounds. 

6. A shop plus the letter y. 

7. A planet plus the letter h. 

8. The whole plus the letter i plus a male 

child. 

9. A great conflict plus a consonant. 

10. A tract of waste land plus the letter e. 

11. A sound plus a preposition. 

12. A month of the year plus a vowel. 

13. Happiness plus ce. 

14. Mineral matter plus a dwelling. 

15. Place of justice plus ot. 

16. A man's first name plus an indefinite 

article. 

17. A common tree plus a human being. 

18. To exist plus a prohibition. 

19. A body of water plus ne. 

20. A bird plus a male child. 

21. A male ruler plus s plus 2000 pounds. 

22. A path phis a suffix. 

23. To talk rapidly plus 2000 pounds. 

24. Not cloudy plus establishments to place 

money. 

25. To chase game plus er. 

26. To clean with water plus to injure with fire. 

27. A head covering plus a grain of a hot 

climate. 

28. An evergreen oak plus es. 

29. A fragrant weed plus a suffix. 

30. To be in debt plus the letter n. 

31. An Irish dish plus a profession. 

32. Additional plus a negative. 

33. A dangerous place for seamen plus a 

vowel. 

34. The first name of a great poet and a 

passage. 

35. A result of cold winds, plus the letter 1 

plus a preposition. 



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JAN ~2 1917 



Content/ 




February 

MOTION PICTUDE 



MAGAZINE 



Vol. XIII 



February, 1917 



No. 1 



PAGE 



Cover Design. Painting of Wallace Reid . . . ... . . . Leo Sicike, Jr. 

Art Portrait of H. B. Warner. Painted by Leo Sielke, Jr. 

Photoplay Reviews. Critical comments on current cinemas .... "Junius" et al. 
Guide to the Theaters. Stage plays in New York that are worth while ..... 
Patter from the Pacific. Live wires from the Western studios . " . Mosgrove Colwcll 

Addition Puzzle 

Art Gallery of Sixteen Popular Players . . . . . . . . . . 

Their "At Homes." A personal call en Marie Doro, Winnif red Greenwood, Rose Tapley, 

Dorothy Davenport, Heiene Rosson, George Field, and others . . . Pearl Gaddis 
The Youngest Motion Picture Director and Camera Man in the World .... 

Ollie Kirkby, the Home Girl Cecilia Mount 

Physical Grace on the Screen. A critical review of the physical charms of leading players, 

including Pavlowa, Kellermann, Storey, Fairbanks, and others . . . . L. E. Eubanks 

Split Interviews. A dozen spicy chats all on one page . . , Dick Willis 

The Island of Desire. Story from the Fox film, featuring George Walsh . Norman Bruce 

The Photodrama. A department for photoplay writers . . . Henry Albert Phillips 
Putting It Over. How they register emotions on the screen .... Pearl White 

A Tiny New Star Is Veta Searl . '• . Hector Ames 

Taking Movies in Beetle-Land. Drawing R. S. Van Rensselaer 

Wallace Reid At Home Eleanor Wardall 

The All-Around Man — Richard Neill . . . . . . . . Peter Wade 

About Our Family. A Satire . . . . . . . . . Arthur L. Kaser 

Stories That Are True ....... Anita Stewart, Marguerite Courtot, 

Ruth Roland, Edna Mayo and Kathlyn Williams 
Interesting Items About Popular Players. Drawings ... . . E. L. Doty 

Her Right to Live. Story from the Vitagraph film featuring Peggy Hyland and 

Antonio Moreno .......... . Dorothy Donnell 

To My Movie Queen. Drawing and verses Dorothy Hughes 

Vive la Social Accomplishment — the Limerick. Monthly Prize Limerick Contest . . 

A Farmer of the Films — Thomas Chatterton ..... Mosgrove Colwell 

Is He (Charles Chaplin) Worth It and Does He Get It? Illustrated with photos from 



his latest release, "The Rink" 

The Movie Maniac. An imaginary monthly newspaper 
Why Marguerite Clark Is Going to Stay in Pictures . 
Breaking Into the Movies in California. A remarkable diary record 
Thomas Meighan, Hero of Many Fires. . . . . 

E. K. Lincoln, Canine Fancier 

Oliver Twist. A story of the Lasky film featuring Marie Doro 
American History in the Movies (Capt. John Smith) 
Greenroom Jottings. Little Whisperings from Everywhere in Player dom 
Popular Player Contest. Final result and announcement of the winners 

Max Linder Comes Back 

Answers to Inquiries. By the first and greatest of all 
The Answer Lady. Questions answered "from the inside" 
Letters to the Editor ......... 



John Tillman Melvin 
Ernest L. Johnson 
Lillian May 
. Suzette Booth 
. W Una Wilde 
. J. Allen Boone 
. Charles Dickens 
. Harvey Peake 



Clement F. Chandler 

The Answer Man 

Rose Tapley 

Our Readers 



171 
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15 
19 

36 

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41 

45 
48 
49 
58 
61 
63 
64 
65 
7C 
71 

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164 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 

(Trade-mark Registered.) Entered at the Brooklyn, N. Y., Post Office as second-class matter. 

Eugene V. Brewster, Managing Editor; Edwin M. LaRoche, Dorothy Donnell, Gladys Hall, E. M. Heinemann 
Robert J. Shores, Associate Editors; Guy L. Harrington, Sales Manager; Frank Griswold Barry, Advertising Manager 
Archer A. King, Western Advertising Representative at Chicago. 

Copyright, 1916, in United States and Great Britain, by The M. P. Publishing Co., a New York Corporation. 
J. Stviart Blackton, President; E. V. Brewster, Sec.-Treas., publishers of Motion Picture 1 Qassk?" 6 

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These world-famous visible writing Olivers are all fresh from the factory. Thou- 
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Special 

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Photo by Campbell 



EARLE WILLIAMS (Vitagraph) 




Photo by Sarony 



ENID BENNETT (Triable) 




BESSIE BARRISCALE (Triangle) 




Photo by Carpenter 



COLIN CHASE 
(Morosco) 





Photo by White 



CARLYLE BLACKWELL 

(World.) 





I 



rhr.'.o by Floyd 



HARRY MYERS (Vim) 




FRED MACE 

(Keystone) 




MAY ALLISON vYorke) 




Photo by Witzel 



CRANE WILBUR (Horsley) 







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Photo by Floyd 



ETHEL CLAYTON (World) 







Only 



Only a face on the screen, 

A woman's face I have seen; 

But it haunts me still, 

Against my will, 
Stormy, and then serene. 

Long do I gaze in her eyes, 
Where Love's swift lightning lies 

Do they change their hue, 

Now dusk, now blue, 
Loveliest eyes I've seen? 



Should we be fated to meet, 
Some day, on the crowded street, 



a Face on the Screen 

By FLORENCE GERTRUDE RUTHVEN 

Would they hold my gaze, 
Amid the maze, 
Orbs of my photo-queen? 

Lips that to me will not speak, 
Oh, eyes that in vain I seek! 

It becomes a star, 

To shine afar — 
Never to earthward lean. 

Only a face on the screen, 
A woman's face I have seen; 

But it haunts me still, 

Against my will, 
Stormy, and then serene. 



35 



*9 rfi?at"/ £/actezs 



"HPhe rarest thing in the world," said 

a grouchy publicity man to me 

one day, "is to find movie stars 

at home long enough to get a picture 

of them there." 

I didn't believe it, but my statements 
didn't convince him any more than his 
convinced me. So I determined to prove 
it. And I went sleuthing. 

The first person I found at home 
was Naomi Childers, Vitagraph's 




ment, so perhaps we might dare to ven- 
ture a wee bit of a suggestion! Any- 
way, she was at home when I got there, 
and the picture proves it. 

Fannie Ward and her husband, Jack 
Dean, also spend quite a bit of time at 
home — home being a beautiful fifty- 
thousand-dollar house in Hollywood, 
with a beautiful lawn, a big 
garage, deep, broad, stone 
steps, and a big old-time 
fireplace in the living- 
room — these advantages 
being enumerated in the 
order given by Fannie. 
Fannie says that there 
was a time, when they 
first bought the place, 
when she thought that 
she and Jack might as 
well move into the 
garage and set up \ 
housekeeping, since the 



synonym for "beauti- 
ful." "All dressed up" 
was Naomi, but that was 
as far as she resembled the 
song, for she most emphat- 
ically was going somewhere. In 
a frock of palest pink, over pale 
green, her hair banded with pearls, 
a stunning taffeta cloak on a chair 
beside her, she was curled up on 
a broad, inviting window-seat, 
looking anxiously down the street 
for some one. It would be rude 
and ill-bred to attempt to guess 
who that some one was ; but 
Naomi has announced her engage- 




36 



WINNIFRED GREENWOOD AND 




GEORGE FIELD 



DOROTHY DAVENPORT 



37 



38 



THEIR AT HOMES 



house decorators seemed to have dug 
themselves into the house for the sum- 
mer. Perhaps house decorators are paid 
by the time they spend on a place, like 
plumbers, which would account for the 
delay in completing their job. Just to 
prove that she has a sense of humor, 
Fannie entertained the decorators at the 
close of their work, when they were 
reluctantly preparing to depart. She 
gave them a lovely dinner-party, and 
Jack, Fannie's husband, says 
that his heart failed him 
as he saw the looks of 
indecision cast about 
by the decorators after 
the dinner — he was so 
afraid they could find 
something to do that 
would keep them an- 
other month, so that 
they might have another 
dinner, with the fair 
Fannie as hostess. 

Then, here's Dorothy 
Davenport, on the veranda 
of the beautiful Elevado 
Street home maintained by 
the handsome couple, Wal- 
lace Reid and Dorothy 
Davenport-Reid. The 
porch has been fitted up 
for an out-of-doors sitting- 
room, with plenty of com- 
fortable chairs, wicker tables, 
flowers, and the like. And it is 
here that the team of Reid and 
Davenport spend their happiest hours. 
For whom do you suppose Dorothy is wait- 
ing? Well, it might be the postman, but 
it is late in the afternoon, and, from the 
smile in her eyes, I am inclined to believe 
that it is friend husband for whom she 
waits and smiles. (My belief in this 
theory is strengthened by the fact that 
Wally arrived just as the picture was 
snapped, and insisted on another being 
taken to prove that he really lived here !) 

No wonder California people rave over 
their wonderful country, or that picture- 
folk, having worked in California, can 
hardly be persuaded to return to New 
York. (All picture people who have 
been in California less than a year are 
not included in this statement.) All this 
train cf. thought was woven from the 



picture of Helene Rosson, a bride of a 
month's standing and a star of several 
years, despite her tender years — oh ! — 
who is shown "culling blossoms from the 
laden vines" for the breakfast table. 
These wonderful rose- 

bushes 
are on 




It 



and 
ather 

i s 



JACK DEAN 

FANNIE WARD 



the lawn of Miss 
Ross on's home, / . 
it is her delight to / y 
and tend them. ^* uj0 
practically impossible to find her any- 
where but in the garden when she isn't 
working at the studio. (The other and 
lesser half of this domestic sketch is 
Ashton Dearholt, a leading man for 
American.) 

Once upon a time, just a few weeks 



THEIR AT HOMES 



39 



ago, Marie Doro had a birthday. There 
were numbers of pretty presents, but 
none more appreciated than the gift of 
Charlie Chaplin, who is an old friend of 
the Dexters, since Marie Doro is, in 
private life, Mrs. Elliott Dexter — this 
gift being a small but perfect Motion 
Picture camera. Numbers of scenarios, 
with priceless casts, have been 
caught by this same 
camera at parties 
given by the happy 
owner of it. The 




TAPLEY 



cast for the first production screened by 
the tiny camera included Blanche Sweet, 
Charlie Chaplin, Mr. and Mrs. Wallace 
Reid, Mr. and Mrs. Dexter, Mary Pick- 
ford, Geraldine Farrar, and others who 
were guests at the birthday dinner-party 
given by the Dexters. Mr. Dexter is 
shown here photographing his wife in 
some close-ups on the veranda of their 
Hollywood home. 

Winnifred Greenwood and her hus- 
band, George Field, spend their spare 



time beautifying the house and grounds 
of their home in Santa Barbara. While 
George works on the car, Winnifred 
tends her garden vigilantly. To see 
them thus engaged gives one a better 
idea of them than any number of words 
could do. They are very much in love 
with each other — a love which is built on 
the sound foundation of mutual tastes 
and interests. 

Here% Rose Tapley, at home, in her 
music-room. Rose was on her way to 
the opera at the time, but kindly con- 
sented to sit still a moment and have a 
likeness taken, to show people that she 
does enjoy being at home. 
Here's hoping her friends 
will find the result of 
the moment of sitting 
still a pleasing one — I 
dont see how they 
could help it. 
When I showed the 
grouchy publicity 
man the pictures I 
had gathered, he 
looked them over 
contemptuously. 
Then, with one 
comprehensive 
gesture, he swept 
them aside and 
snarled. 

Now, zchat can 
you do with a man 
like that? But I 
ups and told him 
something right 
then and there. The 
day has come and 
gone when players want 
to be pictured only as "all 
dolled up," and the day has 
come to stay when their friends want to 
see them in intimate, cozy snapshots. The 
publicity man, with his big tripod cam- 
era, used to pose them for "publicitv pur- 
poses only," that fixed and rigid look that 
we used to see when the photographer 
put the back of your head in an iron rest. 
But now — glory be ! — the studio-folk 
have their own cameras, and they send us 
"themselves," to write a loving article 
around or to hang in our den. So, after 
"showing the light" to Mr. Publicity 
Man, I gathered up my pictures and left. 





The Youngest Motion 
Picture Director in 
the World— Also the 
Youngest Camera-Man 



They are the talented children of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Stuart Blackton. 
Do you recognize them ? They are 
also screen stars, and you all saw 
them in "The Battle Cry of Peace" 
and in other photoplays. They are 
not only clever, but they are beau- 
tiful, and no doubt they have a 
big future before them, provided 
their parents will permit them to 
devote their talents to the screen 
profession. Their next appearance 
will be made in a series of plays 
called "Nature Classics," in which 
Paula Blackton and Jewell Hunt 
are featured. 



40 




I hadn't pictured Ollie Kirkby in that 
way at all. Watching her on the 
screen in the "Grant, Police Re- 
porter" series as a dashing adventuress or 
sophisticated Secret Service operative, I 
had come to think of her in a totally dif- 
ferent manner. As I stroll ejd along the 
shaded Jacksonville street, I pieced to- 
gether the fragments of my mental 
picture. 

''She will be found in a heavily cur- 
tained music-room, " I told myself. 
'There will be the faint touch of a 
strange perfume on the air. The vivid 
yet subdued hues of her gown will merge 
silently with the shadows of the room. 
The " 

Oh, I went on and on in the language 



of a Laura Jean Libbey opening chapter. 
It was a romantic picture that I painted. 
I had my head above the clouds, as I 
turned the corner of the street on which 
Miss Kirkby's bungalow is located. 



And- 



-bang! thud! smash! — with what 



41 



a crash my air-castles fell to the earth ! 
For there, before my eyes, was the dash- 
ing adventuress on the lawn before her 
house, wielding nothing more dangerous 
than a garden hose. What is more, she 
was doing it in a thoroly feminine, 
'housekeeper-like'' manner. I swallowed 
my chagrin, as I turned up the path and 
introduced myself. Two hands sprang 
forward to meet mine ; the hose dropped 
to the lawn, to wabble about in a snake- 
like stream. There was some quick side- 



0LL1E KIRKBY, THE HOME GIRL 




MISS KIRKBY S HOME AND GARDEN GET 
EVERY MINUTE OF HER SPARE TIME 



stepping, and, when the flood finally had 
been stopped, we adjourned to the porch 
for our chat. 

Perhaps my first question disclosed my 
surprise at finding the picturesque char- 
acter of the screen engaged in the peace- 
ful duties of the matron. At any rate, 
Miss Kirkby laughed. 

"Why," she said, "I just love this little 
home. It gets every minute of the time 




that I can spare from my work at the 
studio and my sports. I just revel in the 
delights of making my home attractive 



OLLIE KIRKBY, THE HOME GIRE 



43 



and then fretting and -fussing about in 
the garden and the lawn here. In fact, 
I think it is more interesting than tennis 
or horseback riding, or any of my sports." 

I knew that Miss Kirkby had been in 
Jacksonville only a short while, so I at- 
tempted to get an opinion on the com- 
parative merits of Florida" and California. 
But it was hopeless. 

"I really cant say myself," she replied, 
a perplexed wrinkle stealing over her 
forehead. "When the Kalem Company 
asked me if I would be willing to be 
transferred from the Los Angeles studio 
to Jacksonville, I thought that it never 
would be possible to say good-by to the 
dear Pacific Coast. But I read some of 
the scenarios of the 'Grant' series and 
saw what fine pictures they would make 
and what a wonderful opportunity they 
would give me, so I decided to take the 
leap. 

"And now that I have been here for a 
few months, I dont know what to say. 
Certainly Jacksonville could not be any 
nicer, and, of course, there's no place like 
California, so what is a poor 'native 
daughter' to do? 

"One reason I have not minded the 
change is this little home. I hated to 
leave my Glendale bungalow, but I think, 
if it is possible, this is even more likable. 
Every once in a while the players gather 
here, and we have teas and wonderful 
times. 

"Yes, you know the Kalem Company 
here in Jacksonville is just one big 
family. There's daring George Larkin, 
Robert Ellis, the director, and William 
McKey, Arthur Albertson, Miss Ross— 
we're all working together, heartily, for 
the success of 'Grant.' I think I enjoy 
my work in this series better than any 
picture I have ever played in. There is 
the zest of variety when you are playing 
in a new story with each one-reel episode, 
and you may be sure there is action 



aplenty, for I have had parts in many 
four- and five-reel productions which had 
less real story than we tell in one reel." 

My recollection of some of the "Grant" 
episodes that I had seen prompted a ques- 
tion regarding the danger of the work. 

"Oh, yes, there is some danger," ad- 
mitted Miss Kirkby. "Each of the 
Robert Welles Ritchie stories contains a 
full share of perilous feats. I get all the 
excitement I crave, tho George Larkin is 
called on to do the most dangerous feats 
in his part as Tommy Grant, the re- 
porter. Really, I think he possesses the 
most wonderful courage. There hasn't 
been a day in all the time that we have 
been at work on this series that he hasn't 
had bruises or other injuries, but he just 
keeps right on, cheerfully asking for 
more. Apparently there is no feat that 
he wont attempt. I dont feel that I am 
anywhere near being a coward, but when 
I hear the scenarios read, and learn the 
reckless exploit that George Larkin is 
expected to perform, I feel a cold shiver 
run down my spine. 

"But I must tell you some more of my 

garden. I am going to have the " 

and far, far away from photoplay sub- 
jects we went. From the garden we 
traveled — conversationally — into the 
house, back to the kitchen, and from 
there to clothes. And when ■ two fem- 
inine hearts — or tongues — unite on that 
subject, all is off. On and on we chatted, 
until I suddenly remembered that there 
is such a thing as a time to depart. 

"Now we'll get back to the hose," I 
said. 

"Er — er — what do you mean?" said 
Miss Kirkby. 

"The garden hose, I mean. Let me un- 
limber my camera and get a snap of you 
as I saw you when I turned the corner 
this afternoon." 

And so it was done. How do you 
like it? 



^^%<± 



A Cruel Awakening 

By MRS. D. M. McPHERSON 



A man loved a stage-star quite madly; 

He'd have given his life for her gladly. 
But the movies she joined, 
'Cause more money she coined, 

And now that man wanders forth sadly. 



For in movies, as you may not know, sir, 
The powder and paint do not "go," sir. 

When he saw on the screen 

His idol, his queen, 
He found she was sixty or mo', sir. 



A " Hetsum-Sweatsum " Son of a Mustang 





[<nini]innytiHfn>unM> j 



ART ACORD s who has come into prominence 

in the "Buck Parvin * series by the 

Mustang Company 




amnxmnnnnnimnnir 




This here Buck aint no pitchur cow- 
hand. His work has been sweat 
into him, an' when he falls ofTen 
his cayuse he's been clean bucked off 
— no stage fall, son! He gets his grub 
and "hooch" workin' for th' movies, but 



44 



he's sure glad when he kin pull up stakes 
an' take his chance with the boys ridin' 
in a rodeo. An' kin he rope en tie en 
shoot? Surest thing yuh know! He's 
a "hetsum-sweatsum" son of a mustang, 
is Artie Buck. 



PHYSICAL GRACE ON THE SCREEN 



47 




dramatic talent. Studying the famous 
statues and paintings cannot but improve 
any one's conception of the possible 
beauty of posture. As a rule, actresses 
rely too much on exteriors. Beauty of 
costume cannot hide clumsiness, but its 
effect is much enhanced by a graceful 
bearing. Hampering skirts and freakish 
shoes naturally prevent most women 
from acquiring the grace that could ' 
readily gained under other* #w *|jj 
Ever actress should thra^ 1 



* % 



jMfc! 1 ^:' 



daily Ion' 



%ir 



EDITH STOREY ANTONIO MORENO 



PAVLOWA 



ANNETTE 
KELLERMANP 




JACK WARREN 
KERRIGAN 



Physical Grace on the Screen 

By L. E. EUBANKS 

or the Motion Picture actor or actress physical grace 
is the foundation of success. Even facial beauty, 
admittedly a leading factor, cannot bring fame and 
une unless its possessor be at 
: fairly graceful in posture and 
ement. It needs but slight ac- 
itance with screen personalities 
)preciate this ; from the stately 
wa to elfish Marguerite Clark, 
jm robust Farnum to the wasp- 
waisted Antonio Moreno, grace is 
a most conspicuous quality. 

Where do they get it? you ask. 
Some have it naturally; we know 
immediately that Theda Bara has 
not required much training in body 
carriage, and that Moreno must 
have been always active and accu- 
rate. Whether natural or acquired, 
grace cannot long endure unless 
backed up by good health. Any 
organic disturbance that lowers the 
nervous energy will detract from 
that muscular spontaneity essential 
to "poetry of motion." The nervous 
system must be keen, vibrant, alive 
— thoroly reliable as a messenger 
from brain to muscle. Nerve dope, 
gluttony, stimulants or overexertion 
are decidedly destructive of grace. 

Health that finds a jov in life, an Douglas Fairbanks 
45 




A " Hetsum-Sweatsum " Son of a Mustang 




spells perso 

ital letters. He^H fJRfimhui. 

of strength, activity^HrTgrace. Belie^! 1 
me, a good carriage counts ; it gives us 
our first impression when an actor walks 
upon the screen. Horseback riding is 
not among the best exercises for all- 
around grace, tho I admit that Leonie 
Flugrath and Anna Little are far from 
clumsy. 

Swimming brings grace, using the 
muscles in easy, long-sweeping move- 
ments. Annette Kellermann, in "Nep- 
tune's Daughter," and Kathlyn Williams, 




PAULINE FREDERICK 



MARGUERITE CLARK 

star in "Thou Shalt Not Covet," are only 
two of the host that owe a large portion 
of their grace to water gymnastics. 

But dancing is probably the greatest 
of all grace-developers. Petite Ann 
Pennington learnt to handle her ninety- 
two pounds dancing with the "Ziegfeld 
Follies," and I think Mae Murray grad- 
uated from the same school. Miss Mur- 
ray has made a special study of grace, 
and, judging by her art, a very success- 
ful one. She likes to go to the Bronx 
Zoo and study the consummate grace of 
the tigers. She is the proud owner of 
a fine collection of Angora cats, too, and 
studies these for useful hints. Edith 
Storey's dancing has been termed a rev- 
elation, and the grace developed by it is 
the very essence of Her art and popularity. 
And how about Pavlowa? Isn't her 
every movement a song? In "The Dumb 
Girl of Portici" she does not need to 
dance to display the dancer's grace; it 



PHYSICAL GRACE ON THE SCREEN 



47 




THEDA BARA 

shows itself beautifully yet sub- 
tilely. As has been hinted, over- 
fatigue detracts from grace by 
lessening nervous energy, and, if 
an actor is working strenuously in 
the production of a play, it is in- 
discreet to add much to the day's 
exertion. But when there is 
strength to spare, all time invested 
in dancing will pay handsome 
returns. The ingenue, Nona 
Thomas, stated the experience of 
scores of sister players when she 
told us that dancing gave her more 
grace than any other physical 
training she could find. 

Every actor should have a sys- 
tem of bedroom exercises to fall 
back on when outdoor games are im- 
practicable. Practice before a mirror — a 
full-length one, if such is accessible ; 
there is nothing better to develop rhyth- 
mic co-ordination of movements. Un- 
questionably, Edith Storey owes much of 
her gliding smoothness to this mirror 
practice. 

A study of posing is useful to a photo- 
player. Perhaps Audrey Munson and 
Francis X. Bushman owe their success 
as much to being good models as to 



dramatic talent. Studying the famous 
statues and paintings cannot but improve 
any one's conception of the possible 
beauty of posture. As a rule, actresses 
rely too much on exteriors. Beauty of 
costume cannot hide clumsiness, but its 
effect is much enhanced by a graceful 
bearing. Hampering skirts and freakish 
shoes naturally prevent most women 
from acquiring the grace that could be 
readily gained under other conditions. 
Every actress should throw aside these 
restrictions daily long enough to culti- 
vate freedom of movement. The pro- 
verbial inability of women to run may be 
ascribed almost solely to the effect of 
dress; where skirts have given place to 
some form of man's attire, or some ath- 
letic suit has been worn daily for a 
time, our sisters have ''discovered" 
their legs and become strong and 
agile on their feet. Such players 
as Grace Cunard, who climbs a 
rope so well, and Helen 
Holmes, who ''goes 
over" a box-car like an 
old brakeman, owe 
much of their popular- 
ity to their familiarity with 
unconventional dress. Pauline 
(Continued on page 162) 




FRANCIS 
BUSHMAN 




OLGA l'ETROVA 



■J*V? 




Split Interviews 

By DICK WILLIS 



Annette Kellermann (Fox) 
"How are you getting along?" 
"Swimmingly." 
"Your favorite dish?" 
"Bread and dripping." 
"Your strongest objection to a city?" 
"Dives." 

"How do you vote?" 
"Wet." 

"You are telling the truth?" 
"The naked truth." 

Henry King (Balboa) 
"What do you devote your time to after 
work?" 

"Hennery." 

"You like your calling?" 

"I dont find any kinks in it." 

"Your teeth are all your own, King?" 

"Not all; I have a crown." 

"Your favorite suit?" 

"Knickerbocker." 

Bessie Barriscale (Ince-Triangle) 
"What part are you now taking?" 
"I am a NYMP." 
"Your favorite bird?" 
" 'The Bird of Paradise.' " 
"In preparing for a part do you make be- 
lieve?" 

"I make up." 

"What do you know of astronomy?" 

"I am a star." 

Howard Hickman (Ince-Triangle) 
"I hope you try hard." 
"How 'ard?" 

"You come from the country?" 
"I'm no Hick, man." 
"You lead in questions of strife?" 
"No, in 'Civilization.'" 
"A strenuous part; what did you take?" 
"I took the count." 

Grace Cttnard (Universal) 
"When were you born?" 
"In the year of Grace — no matter." 
"You were born in Paris — how did you 
come over?" 
"Cunard line." 
"How are you feeling?" 
"Like a square Peg in a round Ring." 
"What form of photoplay do you prefer?" 

" 'To be continued in our next.' " 

• 

Ruth Roland ( Balboa-Pathe ) 
"Your favorite line in Shakespeare?" 
"Here's Rue-eth for you." 
"Your best line of parts?" 
"Pathe-tic." 

"Whom do you prefer to work for?" 
"The man 'Who Pays.' " 
"Your favorite diet?" 
"Serials." 



48 



Francis X. Bushman (Metro) 
"Descended from?" 
"The Bushmen." 
"Favorite country?" 
"France is." 

"You use your second name?" 
"As an Xtra." 

"You have a good leading lady?" 
"Excuse the Swedish — I Bane." 
"You are popular?" 
"My rise was Metro-otic." 

Claire McDowell (Universal) 
"Declare your favorite dessert?" 
"Eclaire." 

"What letter did you swear by?" 
"BI 0." 

"Whom do you prefer now?" 
" 'U.' " 

"What did your parents do to make you an 
actress?" 
"Smacdowell." 

Rhea "Ginger" Mitchell (American) 
"Where do you stand in your profession?" 
"Not in the Rhea." 
"You are enthusiastic?" 
"Lots of Ginger." 
"Fond of flying?" 
"Flying, eh? Sure." 

"You want to be leading woman to Rich- 
ard Bennett?" 
"I've Bennett." 

Myrtle Stedman (Pallas) 
"Where do you live, usually?" 
"Pallas." 

"What did you start operatic work for?" 
"For a song." 

"You chose pictures in place of opera?" 
"Instead man." 

"You believe in concert-ed charity?" 
"That's my platform." 

Harry Ham (Christie Comedies) 
"Well connected, Ham?" 
"Quite well bread." 

"You like drama as well as comedy?" 
"Yes, sandwiched in between." 
"Your favorite reading-matter?" 
"I used to like Hamlet; but I'm cured 
now, so it's Bacon." 

Helen Holmes (Signal) 
"What gave you your start, girl?" 
"I got in the Game." 
"A success?" 
"A Signal success." 
"Go out much?" 
"No, we're stay-at-Holmes." 
"Did you once star in the 'Hazards of 
Helen'?" 

"We did Kalem that." 
"Do you get a good salary?" 
'If I didn't there'd be Helen all to pay." 



GEORGE WALSH 




This story was written from the Photoplay and story of J. ALLEN DUNN 



**& 



When Bruce Chalmers turned up at 
the office- of the Argosy, with 
his breathless tale of a South 
Sea island inhabited by cannibals, a 
golden-haired white maiden, and a for- 
tune in priceless pearls, Maitland laughed 
loud and long. Pink enthusiasm deep- 
ened red wrath on Chalmers' smooth, 
boyish cheeks, but he waited, grimly si- 
lent, till the news editor's joy was some- 
what abated. 

"Gosh all fish-hooks!" wheezed Mait- 
land, "that yarn'd make the sea-serpent 



49 



pale with envy ! You've missed your 
forte, old man ; you ought t' be editing 
Grimm's fairy-tales, or Uncle Jack's 
'Children's Corner.' Say ! d'you dream 
these bits of news you bring in here, or 
what?'' 

"The man that told me about the 
island died half an hour ago," - said 
Chalmers, briefly. "A Kanaka he was, 
brought in by a fishing-schooner after a 
week adrift on the South Seas. And he 
had one of the pearls with him to back 
up his story. There was another fellow 



£*^ 



50 



THE ISLAND OF DESIRE 



there when I was — Sayers, an adven- , 
turer, he said — and he thought the pearl 
looked like real stuff." 

"Did he have the golden-haired lady 
along, too?" jeered Maitland. "Nay, : 
nay, son. A musical comedy producer 
might buy your plot, but it dont come 
under the heading of 'NewsJ " 

Bruce Chalmers laid down his foun- 
tain-pen with an air of finality. He 
placed his note-book beside it, adding a 
reporter's badge and policeman's whistle. 

"You editors make me sick and tired !" 
he told his incredulous chief, hotly. 
"You want to squeeze and squeeze the 
world till every drop of good, red- 
blooded romance and adventure is out of 
it, and only the old, dry-bone facts and 
statistics are left. You've got red ink in 
your veins. You think there's nothing 
about the world you dont know. You 
reduce human joy, and sorrow, and love, 
and death to terms of type, and measure 
them ouHn columns !" 

He thought of a great deal more to 
say, but took up his hat instead. 

"W- where are y-you — going?" gasped 
Maitland, apprehension in his eye. 

"To the South Sea Islands," replied 
Chalmers, calmly, "to find the pearls and 
the girl!" 

And the door closed across his gentle 
smile of farewell. The editor stared 
down at the funeral pyre of reportorial 
tools on the desk, where Bruce had laid 
them, and sorrow gloomed in his eye. 

"Pink girls — blonde pearls," he bab- 
bled. "He's a nut ! He wouldn't be safe 
where there were squirrels ! But say ; if 
I wasn't an old stick-in-the-mud family 
man, I'd go with him, d — d if I 
wouldn't ! Aw h— 11 !" 

Chalmers went rapidly down the street, 
turning into a saloon near the water- 
front. There he had left Henry Sayers 
half an hour ago, and there, instinct told 
him, he was likely to find him lingering 
yet. There was no great warmth of 
welcome in Saver's bloodshot, gray eyes, 
as the young reporter approached, but 
Chalmers' spirit was too buoyant to be 
depressed by rebuffs. He flung his long 
limbs into a rickety chair across the 
sloppy table from the adventurer and 
leaned forward confidentially. 

"What'd you do with that pearl?" he 



queried breezily. "Humph! I thought 
so," as the other's hand went involun- 
tarily to his waistcoat pocket. "You 
needn't look green about the gills," he 
informed the glowering man. "Little 
Willie isn't any spoiled sport; besides, 
I'm out for bigger game, and I guess the 
poor devil that owned it wont need it 
where he's gone. Say ; suppose we go 
after the rest of 'em — three hundred, lie 
said, big as filberts. Why, man, our 
fortunes are made !" 

Henry Sayers laughed gratingly. He 
lifted the glass of stale beer in one great, 
hairy hand, and drained it to the dregs 
before he answered, measuring his com- 
panion, meanwhile, under lowering lids. 

"F'r instance," he said then, jeeringly, 
"I s'pose you've got ten thousand in your 
jeans to charter a ship?" 

Chalmers' face fell. He ran his hand 
thru his thick, dark hair till it stood on 
end ; then he brightened. 

"What's the use of picking flaws? 
Money is a minor matter!" he dismissed 
it complacently. "Let's be sure the pearl 
is genuine first and we'll find the rest 
easy." He sprang to his feet, eyes ablaze 
with young excitement. "And I know 
the fellow who can tell us about our 
pearl and keep mum !" 

The joint pronoun rankled in Sayers' 
soul, as he followed the tall, broad figure 
out into the sunshine and thru crooked 
windings of cobblestones to the Chinese 
quarter of the Australian town. But he 
was penniless, and the story of the pearls 
and adventure had gone to his head till 
he was drunk with desire. So he sul- 
lenly handed over his possession into the 
plump, yellow hand of the Chinaman, 
whom Chalmers greeted as Yuan Yuck. 

Breathlessly the two watched the 
mask-like face of the expert widen into 
a silent grimace of amaze. Chalmers 
felt his blood tingling in his cheeks, and 
even the heavy-jowled face of the ad- 
venturer took on a sluggish crimson. 
Silently Yuan tested the pearl ; silently he 
laid it down on the table before him. 

"It is genuine," he said in his slow, 
lisping English; "a beautiful pearl, 
worth at least five thousand dollars." 

"Five — thousand — dollars ?" repeated 
Chalmers, in accents of awe. "Then the 
bag of 'em he told of would be worth — 



THE ISLAND OF DESIRE 



51 



a million and a half! God! And it's 
ours!" He reached for the pearl. 
Sayers' hairy paw shot out to forestall 
him, but both met a plump, yellow hand 
instead of the pearl. 

"I furnish the money for your expe- 
dition !" said Yuan, suavely. "I go too !" 

Across the opa 
lescent sea the 
newly risen 
sun struck 
gleams 
of fire 



peering, under a shielding hand, into the 
dazzling light. 

"The girl — he said there was a 

girl " he stammered, and suddenly 

blushed crimson from his forehead to his 
throat. For before his eyes the miracle 
occurred as of old in the fabled sea — 
Venus sprang from the 
waves. 

Outlined against 

the pure light 

she stood, 

naked, 

strange 




IT IS GENUINE WORTH AT LEAST FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS 



from the wet sand, printing a scarlet, 
slender line of footprints leading from the 



palm-grove down to the water's edge. In 
the waves a white shoulder glistened ; a 
warm, naked arm shot high into the 
golden air, flinging rainbow-spray on 
high. And a peal of laughter, free, joy- 
ous as the cries of the gulls, rang across 
the water to the three in the tiny 
boat. 

Bruce Chalmers started to his feet, 



flames streaming about her young limbs, 
as the sun caught the brine that drenched 
them. The gold of dawn was in the hair 
that lay along the small girl-breasts ; the 
purity of dawn was in the unconscious 
beauty of her pose as, startled, she gazed 
at the intruders under one npflung arm. 
"Dont look!" gasped the boy, and sud- 
denly bent over the oars to hide his hot. 
quivering face. "We frightened her — 
shameful! Why didn't we stay aboard?" 



52 



THE ISLAND OF DESIRE 



Henry Sayers grunted contemptuously. 
'•Didn't you ever go t' a burlesque show ?" 
he sneered. "Well, you are a milk-faced 
baby-boy ! Maybe you think we'd ought 
'a' telephoned her we was coming?" 

Yuan said nothing. He watched the 
slim, white figure run up the beach and 
into the banyan-trees, 
with impassive, 
almond eyes. 
He was a 
connoisseur 
of more 



in Sayers' small eyes ; Yuan breathed 
heavily thru thick, parted lips, and Chal- 
mers felt the hair stir along, the muscles 
of his neck. 

"Come on, if you're coming," growled 
Sayers, at last, unostentatiously sliding 
his rifle from the skiff. But Chalmers 
took it out of his hands, 
said 
sarcastically. "I 
feel, some- 
how, as tho 
would 
be 




WHEN MONEY LUST YIELDS TO THE GREATER LOVE 



than pearls. And the keel of the boat 
grated on the white sand. 

The three men clambered out stiffly ; 
they eyed each other askance. Some- 
thing in the feel of the long-looked-for 
island under their feet worked in their 
blood the subtle alchemy of distrust. 
The sense of common purpose that had 
brought them on their wild quest slipped 
away, and the primal law of each-for- 
himself took its place. Red fires glowed 



easier in our minds without them — just 
a bit more careful. And we'll wait a 
while longer, if you please, till the young 
lady has — time to dress." 

It was half an hour later when they 
crashed thru a thicket of gaudily flow- 
ered underbrush into a clearing in which 
stood a hut of bamboo, woven with reeds 
and thatched with bundles of coarse, dry 
grass. In the door of the hut,, watching 
them composedly, stood a girl dressed in 



THE ISLAND OF DESIRE 



53 



a blue serge skirt of not more than three 
seasons ago and a sailor blouse. It took 
Chalmers' surprised brain several mo- 
ments to realize that the island was in the 
path of trading ships and that no doubt 
the girl had bartered for 

the Clothes she WOre ■wrr»wjrwra.s»s:a 

with the captain of one 
of these. 

He was oddly discon- 
certed at the reflection 
and at the English with 
which she greeted them. 
It would have been 
more romantic to have 
discovered an Eve-girl 
who had never seen a 
white man before. 

"Goo' marneen," said 
the girl quaintly ; "you 
did come f'om a bo-at?" 
she gestured toward the 
sea. Chalmers bowed, 
blushing boyishly. He 
was suddenly at a loss 
for words. What should 
one say to a golden- 
haired young lady living- 
all alone on an island in 
the South Seas? 

But Savers had no 
social hesitations. He 
thrust his ill features 
between Chalmers and 
the girl and cleared his 
throat uncouthly. 

"A Kanaka who 
drifted ashore last 
month had this on him," 
he said, opening his fist 
to show the pink luster 
of the pearl within. "He 
said there was others 
here — a whole bag of 
'em. Is that so?" 

She was gazing with 
widening eyes at the 
tiny, pink thing, and 
suddenly twin tears 
hung on the thick lashes 
daid?" she wept. "Tha's Lio, my fren'. 
He save me, sooch a many three-six-ten 
year 'go, f'om water w'en sheep sank. 
He ver goo' to me." 

Chalmers' heart swelled with pity at 
the forlorn story behind her words. A 



shipwrecked white child brought up on 
this remote, wild coast with only an old 
Kanaka to care for her ! He felt a sud- 
den impulse to pick her up bodily and 
hurry her back to civilization, and reg- 




CHALMERS HEART SWELLED WITH PITY 



Ees he- 



ular pretty girl-clothes, and girl-good 
times. But Sayers was speaking impa- 
tiently. 

"But these" — he brandished the pearl — 
"are there any more of these here on the 
island? Come on, now — quick!" 

"You wanta see Lio's tears?" she 



54 



THE ISLAND OF DESIRE 



asked, puzzled. "Tha's w'at he call 'em 
—tears of fallen an- gels. Ver' pret-ty, 
thos' tears, mebbe you t'ink ?" 

She led the way into the interior of 
the hut, and, as simply as if she were 
displaying pebbles, opened a linen bag 
and disclosed to their incredulous 
eyes a rosy heap of pearls, ranging 
in tint from the palest, flushed 
ivory to great, throbbing globes in 
which a crimson tide beat and 
ebbed. 

The three men gazed, dry of lip, 
with husky breath that rasped 
across the silent room. In the 
almond eyes was the jewel greed 
of the expert; in the small, gray 
eyes the lust of gain ; in Chalmers' 
dark gaze was the light of adven- 
ture and fantasy. Then, as if at a 
signal, they raised their heads and 
gazed at the girl. And, with a 
woman's swift instinct, she read 
their looks aright. The Celestial 
stared at her with the unwinking- 
appraisal of the panderer ; the Aus- 
tralian with unabashed desire; but 
in Chalmers' humble gaze she di- 
vined only boyish worship, and sud- 
denly, without realizing why, she 
moved to him and clung to his arm. 

Crisis hovered over the little 
group. Savers' lips drew back 
from his teeth in a snarl. 

"Take the girl, if you want her ; 
I'll take the pearls," he growled. 
Yuan's voice was like thick oil. 

"And what of me?" he smiled. 
He put his plump hand, that was 
always a little cold, on the Aus- 
tralian's sleeve. "Let us not 
quarrel," he said smoothly. "We 
brought goods to exchange for the 
pearls. They are in the boat. Let 
us return for them, leaving Excel- 
lency to keep the lady company." 

The pearls glowed softly on the 
table. The underbrush snapped, 
and the men's footsteps died away. Chal- 
mers drew a dizzy breath, as he looked 
down at the bright head so near his 
shoulder. He had never noticed women 
much, but now he seemed to see all 
womankind at once — its softness, its 
sweetness, its purity and beauty. A pulse 
under her soft fingers on his arm beat 



like a heart. And suddenly he found 
himself stammering mad things. 

"And I thought I was coming after 
pearls — pearls!" he was saying. "Are 
you sorry I came?" 

The rich, strange island, with its heavy 







THE DISCORD OF LUST AND GREED BREAKS 

flower-scents and gaudy bird-wings flash- 
ing thru the palms, was surely not the 
same world' he had been living in ; this 
man, quivering thru every tiniest nerve, 
could not be the immature, commonplace 
self he had always known. And he could 
never have uttered the words he heard 
himself saying, unless this were indeed 



THE ISLAND OF DESIRE 



55 



some exotic, dizzying dream of happiness, 
out of and beyond himself. 

''You beautiful one— you wonderful 
one — did you know your hair was pure 
solid gold? Dont tremble, dearest; 
surely you know why I have come. In 



,:,;;.. .:•:*- ■,-_,■,-._,: ■^f'^ ^'V ' ^. .' '^ ' \ ' ^ -'"'*■"' \ " r' ^ - ■ . ' ' ''■ , " 




OUT AMONG THE PEARL-HUNTERs 

a little while I shall kiss you, and then 

you will know, if you dont now " 

A branch snapped somewhere in the 
forest outside, and a wild bird uttered a 
shrill, sharp cry. It startled him. He 
dropped her hand and turned a dazed 
face toward the door. Then he under- 
stood. 



With a single stride he reached the 
door and slammed it in the face of 
Sayers leering above the rifle in his 
hands. There was a bolt on it — primitive 
but strong. He jammed it into place, 
drew a gasping breath, and flung the 
girl to the floor just as a shot 
crashed thru the window-square. 
Huddling against the sides of the 
hut, he crawled to the window, 
pulled the heavy wooden shutters 
across it, and turned to the white- 
faced girl. 

"Have you a gun? Lio must 

have had one Good !" He 

clutched the antiquated thing she 
brought him, and the feel of it 
cleared his whirling brain. Good 
healthy anger surged thru him. 

"The cowardly traitors !" he 
muttered. "It's us or them now, 
so here goes !" 

An answering bullet sang thru 
the walls, and the besiegers ran 
precipitately for shelter. They 
had not calculated on there being 
a gun in the hut, and recognized 
at once that the advantage was 
all on Chalmers' side in a gun-duel. 
"Mans wan' keel us?" asked 
the girl softly. In the half-light 
her face wasTike a flower of the 
dusk. She glided to him, and he 
felt her breath against his arm. 
"I no 'f'aid black mans on next 
f-lan'," she whispered tremu- 
lously ; "I no 'f'aid wil' beas' ; I 
no 'f'aid you; but I 'f'aid yel- 
low man's eyes an' oder man's 

han's " 

"Dont you worry !" Chalmers 
said cheerfully, but his tone was 
no longer that of the lover. There 
was steel in it. The enchanted 
moment was gone. He sat down 
on a bench and lighted a cigar, 
crossing his long legs comfor- 
tably. "Now, suppose you tell 
me your name and all about yourself." 
The short hours of tropical sun flew 
by with the sound of her soft, broken 
syllables. Her name was Lelia, but that 
was all she could remember, for she had 
been only six when the ship in which she 
and her father were sailing had gone 
down and tossed her upon this wild 



50 



THE ISLAND OF DESIRE 



island. Lio, a Kanaka exiled from his 
people for some crime, had rescued her 
and cared for her. She had never quite 
forgotten her native tongue in the twelve 
years on the island. "But I . no spik 
mabbe ver' well?" she asked him wist- 
fully. There had been no trading-ships 
come here, but Lio had gone, sometimes, 
to other islands in his canoe and brought 
her back her clothes. She had been alone 
three months now. 

Unexpectedly, her story was inter- 
rupted. It had grown quite dark in the 
hut, but suddenly a strange glow lighted 
up the roof — an ugly, crimson glow that 
brought Chalmers to his feet in horror. 

'They've fired the hut !" he groaned, 
"and they're waiting outside for us. 
This is a pretty kettle of fish !" 

He picked up the linen bag of pearls 
and thrust it into his breast. Lelia ran 
to a box on the other side of the room 
and returned with her hands full of pa- 
thetic treasures, a looking-glass, a faded 
photograph 

"Hark!" she cried eagerly. "Lis-'en! 
it ees the Beeg Win' !" 

Over the top of the forest ran a strong 
shudder, and the great heads of the palms 
bowed in pain. A rushing thru the wide 
spaces of the sky, and the tropical storm 
was upon them in a wild song of wind 
and rain. The fire-glow vanished. The 
frail hut shivered, and water poured thru 
the ruined roof, hot and smelling of dank, 
swampy places and decaying vegetation. 

"Here's our chance and our only one !" 
Chalmers shouted close to the girl's ear. 
He unbolted the door and staggered, as 
the typhoon swept in upon them; then, 
carrying her in one arm and his gun in 
the other, he breasted the tide of wind. 

"We cant — live — an hour in this !" he 
panted, after they had gone a few yards. 
"We might — as well — have been roasted 
as — -drowned!" 

"I know wher' is cave !" Lelia cried. 
"I take you ther' — see, like this " 

She took his hand and ran forward. 
A moment later and they stood in the 
shelter of trees. They struggled on more 
easily now, she guiding him by some 
sixth sense, while all about them great 
branches cracked and fell, and frightened 
birds swept their faces with frantic 
wings. And then, unexpectedly, they 



stood in a shelter of some kind, with a 
dry floor of earth underfoot and the 
baffled wind shrieking somewhere out- 
side. Chilled to the bone, they crept to- 
gether instinctively. Chalmers sat upon 
the floor of the cave; the girl rested her 
head on his knees, and they slept the 
sleep of utter exhaustion. Once, thru 
chaotic dreams, Chalmers thought he 
heard a dog whining near-by and won- 
dered, dimly, whether the ship's mascot 
had swum ashore ; again, he thought he 
heard a far-off groaning and rumbling, 
but sleep drowned conjecture. 

It was full daylight before he opened 
heavy eyes, to find Lelia already awake 
and caressing the ship's dog. 

"Does that mean those rascals have 
left the island, or that they're still here ?" 
he reflected, looking out of the narrow 
cave-mouth into the quivering heat of 
midday. "Let them go ! I can rig up 
some sort of raft to take us over to the 
next inhabited island. But no ; they would 
never give up the pearls so easily " 

Lelia interrupted his musings with a 
cry. The square of daylight had disap- 
peared ! And, even as he stared, incred- 
ulously, he heard the groaning and rum- 
bling that had disturbed his dreams. 

"An earthquake !" he cried, with a 
shaken laugh. "It looks as if old Mother 
Nature, out of pure feminine jealousy, 
was on the side of our pearl-hunting 
friends !" 

The mountain was in agony. It 
writhed in primal labor pain. With every 
convulsion Chalmers expected the roof 
of their shelter to crush them beneath 
tons of rock. Yet again they were 
spared. 

Twenty-four hours later two earth- 
stained figures crept from the opening 
they had dug in the side of their living 
tomb. They were both faint with hun- 
ger and worn by the terrors of the ordeals 
they had endured. 

"You must wait here," Chalmers told 
her. "I hate to leave you, but you cant 
walk a step without food. I'll find a 
cocoanut or two and some fruit and be 
back in a jiffy. Here; you take these." 

He thrust the bag of pearls into her 
hands and hurried away as fast as his 
shaking limbs could take him. It was 
not until nearly an hour later when he 



THE ISLAND OF DESIRE 



57 



was returning, arms full of plunder, that 
he remembered his enemies. A sudden 
chill shot thru his heart. Suppose they 
had come on her, alone and unprotected ? 
Suppose 

He broke into a 
"Lelia!" he cried. "Lelia 

There was no sign 
of life before 
their cave, but 
within h«e 
caught 



for which he had bartered his life, 
clenched in one rigid hand. Near him 
lay the Chinaman, dying of a wound 
in the chest. 

"He shoot me; I kill him!" Yuan said 

laconically. "The girl isn't hurt. Sayers 

would have attacked her, 

but he found that 

picture " 

Chalmers 
stared daz- 
edly at 




IT S A PICTURE OF HIMSELF WHEN HE WAS YOUNGER 



the sound of low moans. Nausea caught 
him by the throat. 

"They've been here !" he muttered. 
At that moment he could have done mur- 
der with his bare hands. "They've hurt 
her " 

But the groans were not from Lelia's 
throat. She lay huddled in a swoon in 
a far corner of the cave. When Chal- 
mers' eyes could focus in the dimness, 
he saw Sayers' dead body lying in a pool 
of blood by the door, the bag of pearls, 



the bit of cardboard at his feet. How had 
that saved Lelia from the brute yonder? 

"It's a picture of himself — when he 
was younger," said the Chinaman, faintly. 
"He thought his family was drowned 
in the shipwreck. She must be — his 
daughter." 

He raised himself on his elbow, point- 
ing a plump, yellow finger. 

"The — pearls " he wheezed thru 

his pierced chest. "Give them to me " 

(Continued on page 163) 




HENRY AL1JERT l'MII/LIl'S 



The Photodrama 

A Department of Expert Advice, Criticism, 

Timely Hints, Plot Construction 

and Market Places 

Conducted by HENRY ALBERT PHILLIPS 



Staff Contributor of the Edison Company, formerly with Pathe 
Freres; Lecturer and Instructe - of Photoplay Writing in The 
Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, also in the Y. M. C. A. 
of New York; Author of "The Photodrama" and "The Feature 
Photoplay" and many Current Plays on the Screen, etc. 



Close Views 

and 

Inserts 



Inadvertently, I asked 
the president of one 
of the well-known 
companies to give me 
some idea of the type 
of plays he would like to have written 
for him. He replied, without hesitation, 
that he wanted "trash" ! He excused his 
statement by adding that the public 
wanted "trash" and nothing but "trash." 

How about that, Mr. and Mrs. Public ? 
Do you want trashy Moving Pictures? 
No, I dont and wont believe it. The 
fact that the public accept trash is not 
an indication that they want it. But if 
you dont want poor pictures, why dont 
you say so? How? Why, protest, po- 
litely, at the box-office of the theater of 
which you are a patron. Ask them first 
if they care for an expression of opinion. 
They will not dare to say no. Then 
tell them that you are of the opinion that 
the Thus-and-So picture, released under 
the name of the This-or-That Company, 
was not up to the standard of this 
theater — mentally, morally, or tempera- 
mentally, as the case may be. 

The box-office is the golden pulse of 
the theater's business. Satisfied patrons 
mean continued patronage and success. 
Dissatisfied patrons spell failure. If only 
a few theatergoers would have the 
courage to express their views, they 
could do much for the betterment of the 
photodrama. 

BUT, dont become a plain, brassy 
knocker. Say a correspondingly good 
word for the plays that have pleased you 
and your families. 

I have very sound reasons for knowing 
that the foregoing suggestion would 



materially aid the photoplaywright. A 
spoken demand for good plays leads to 
a demand for good play-makers. And, 
as the deliberate maker of bad plays is 
an undesirable citizen of the craft, the 
system would have a far-reaching effect. 
And now for just a word in conclusion 
and reply to the official of the company 
who insists upon producing "trash." The 
stock of the said company has gone down 
to less than a dollar a share, and even at 
that figure has no buyers. The men in 
Wall Street, who make a profession of 
rating commercial success, have branded 
this company. There is the handwriting 
on the wall ! It is the answer to all who 
give the public "trash" in return for 
good money ! 



Plotting 

the 

Photoplay 



It shall be the pur- 
pose of this sub-de- 
partment to enable 
every student and 
reader to distinguish 
PLOT Material whenever and wherever 
found ; to bring within reach inex- 
haustible Sources of New ^Material ; to 
acquire a faculty for PLOT Analysis ; 
to master readily the Construction of the 
Complete Work f roiL . e Plot Germ, and 
to learn how appropriately to clothe 
the Plot with a complete Dramatic 
Composition. 

A careful analysis of the difficulties 
that stand between an ability to conceive 
a dramatic idea and the effective and 
complete expression of the same discloses 
that PLOT Distinction, Arrangement, 
Developme"' ~^ Completion are para- 
mount. 

A Plot more than a mere 



THE PHOTODRAMA 



59 



plan or design, the beginning, end and 
scope of which we may behold at a 
glance. 

A plan or design is, after all, but a set 
of instructions, cold and lifeless, com- 
posed by a genius, possibly, and carried 
out by one, too. 

A PLOT, however, operates upon the 
matter it inhabits just as a soul does on a 
body. It first gives perfect form and 
then ignites with indestructible life, 

A PLOT selects and assimilates or- 
ganic particles of like material into a 
palpitating organism. 



Screenings 

from 

Current Plays 



The question is, Is 
it worth an Overland 
automobile to sit thru 
the whole series of 
such a chain of plays 
as "The Crimson Stain" ? However true 
that may be, I feel sure that it is not 
worth gambling many hours of valuable 
time against that of several million others 
in the hope of winning one of the auto- 
mobiles being offered to any patron who 
writes a scenario based on the charac- 
ters, mysteries and situations to be seen 
in "The Crimson Stain." I repeat it is a 
stroke of genius — not squandered on the 
plays — that bribed the public with an 
automobile. 

Not that I have any personal enmity 
against serials. On the contrary, I fairly 
eat them when they follow the directions 
to be found on the technical box. But 
half-cooked serials are unfit for public 
consumption. 

"The Figure in Black" was the title of 
the only episode I have seen. Suspense, 
I should say, was the mainspring of these 
plays, but so much time was spent in in- 
sufficient explanations that suspense was 
lost. Probability^ .was ignored. 

But why slather "ii-R, public with tawdry 
"blood and thunder" that it would not 
be guilty of reading about? Why cant 
we have serials with finer ideas and ideals 
— let us say with the motif like Vita- 
graph's "The Goddess"? Practically all 
of the continued plays that are now on 
arouse all of the baser emotions, such 
as horror, fear, prejudice and bigotry. 

I had never seen Theda Bara. There- 
fore, when I found myself witnessing 
"Her Double Life," I fully expected to 



see a slimy vampire crawl sinuously 
upon the screen. 

But the Theda Bara I saw was a fin- 
ished actress with all the finer and tender 
attributes of a refined woman. Here is 
an actress who can tell all the emotions 
and passions in her soul thru the depth 
and wonder of her eyes ! 

The directing in "Her Double Life" 
is faithful to the point of conviction. 
The coster scenes are Whitechapel. The 
battle excerpts have been made with a 
fine discrimination of what was neces- 
sary to the story's dramatic essence. 
Here is a gratifying play ! 

QUALIFICATIONS OF THE 
PHOTOPLAYWRIGHT 



Lessonettes 



In the first place, the 
aspirant and student 
of the photodrama 
must remembe r — 
many other advisers to the contrary — 
that, altho he is writing the "silent 
drama," yet his product in scenario form 
must meet the literary requirements of 
all manuscript. 

Too often editors seek reasons why 
they should not accept a manuscript, 
rather than those excellencies that should 
make it acceptable. 

Misspelled words, ungrammatical sen- 
tences and gross errors in rhetoric preju- 
dice their judgment against acceptance. 

Many a manuscript that might have 
crept into acceptance because of its ex- 
cellent idea has been rejected because of 
minor faults that brought it into disfavor. 

Punctuation even is an effective means 
in the hands of the student who would 
make his meaning clear and piercing. 

The foregoing paragraphs mean neither 
of two things. They do not mean that you 
have got to be a "highbrow" and sprinkle 
your scenario with classical allusions. 
As sure as you do, the manuscript will 
be promptly rejected. Nor does it mean 
that you can send in ideas written on 
butcher's paper and obscured by beef- 
stains and illiteracy. 

Good, strong, straight-from-the-shoul- 
der, grammar-school English will suffice, 
provided you have a dramatic idea and 
know how to express it. 

That is what this department will en- 
deavor to show you. 




Photo by Walter 



MILDRED MANNING, Vitagraph Leading Lady 




"Putting It Over" 

By PEARL WHITE 

The third of a series of articles by leading players, showing how ihey register emotions 

and produce dramatic effects 



While, like every other actress, I 
have a secret fondness for emo- 
tional parts, my career seems to 
be definitely bound to the "thrillers." 
From a very early age I have taken 
delight in doing harebrained, reckless 
things, and the more danger there has 
been in them the more pleasure there has 
been for me. I can claim no credit for 
this daredevil spirit, since it seems to 
have been born in me. 

It was this same reckless spirit that 
induced me, after some seasons of ex- 
perience as a trapeze artist in a circus, 
to enter the Motion Pictures. The in- 
dustry was starting to grow at that time, 
and I felt that here, better than anywhere 
else, I could find a field for my love of 
adventure. 

The life of a "stunt" actress is no 
sinecure, but I have been in the pictures 
for over three years now, and am falling 
more in love with my work every day. 



61 



However, it is no life for one without 
a love for the unnatural. 

I remember one of my first experiences 
in making "The Perils of Pauline," some 
two years ago. The villain, in order to 
encompass my death, w r as supposed to 
have shut me in a cellar with the hero, 
and then turn in the water from a canal. 
It was really quite thrilling in the picture. 
As the cellar was supposedly full of rats, 
the rising water would naturally bring 
them out. Pictorially, the "stunt" Avas 
perfect. When the water rose to our 
necks, the director turned loose several 
dozens of rats, which had been caught 
for the occasion, and threw them in with 
us. As I swam around, there were rats 
everywhere,, poetically speaking — to the 
right of me, to the left of me, and behind 
me. Some got in my hair, others clung 
to my clothes, and one more ambitious 
than the rest bit me on the ear. Now, it 
is peculiar, but I had no other feeling 



62 



-PUTTING IT OVER" 



than anger at the little beasts. I was not 
half so much frightened as the rest of 
the company looking on, and simply felt 
that it was all in the day's work. I guess 
it is just a question of getting used to it 
all, and of being ready to carry out, at 
a brief moment's notice, anything that 
the wisdom of the fertile-brained director 
may devise. 

Sometimes the "stunts" required are 
unpleasant, like the above, and sometimes 
they afford us a new thrill which is just 
the reverse. Some time ago, a story 
called for me to get into a captive bal- 
loon, and, while I was in the basket alone, 
for the villain to come up and cut the 
rope. We hired a balloon and anchored 
it on the edge of the Palisades, over in 
New Jersey. I was instructed before- 
hand how to use the ripping-cord when 
I wished to descend, and everything was 
ready. It worked beautifully. The vil- 
lain cut the rope. The balloon shot up 
into the air, drifted over the Hudson, 
sailed majestically over New York, 
crossed the East River, and then went 
out over Long Island. The view was 
wonderful. I forgot all about the rip- 
ping-cord, and gave myself up to enjoy- 
ing this new sensation. Then, suddenly, 
I realized that I was over the ocean, and 
that if I didn't drop soon the day might 
end in a tragedy. I pulled the cord, and 
landed in a marsh only a few steps from 
the beach. Shortly afterward, my direc- 
tor, Mr. Gasnier, joined me, nearly crazy 
with worry because I hadn't come down 
sooner. And he couldn't seem to under- 
stand that I had really and truly had a 
good time. 

We worked another "thriller" with 
that same balloon, which wasn't quite so 
entertaining for me. It was anchored on 
the edge of the Palisades again, and they 
wrote something into the script which 
made it necessary for me to go down the 
anchor-rope hand-over-hand. The bas- 
ket was over a hundred feet in the air, 
and it was not a particularly nice "stunt" 
to do. I put on a pair of heavy gloves, 
and let myself down over the side of the 
car. The balloon swayed back and forth 
in the wind, so that one had the sensation 
of being in a giant swing. My circus 
experience on the trapeze stood me in 
good stead, and, keeping my eyes always 



on the car, I gradually let myself down. 
Once I nearly lost my "nerve." That 
was in an episode of "The Exploits of 
Elaine." I had a scene with the villain 
on the top of a church steeple. We had 
to struggle as he tried to throw me off. 
In the first place, the script called for 
me to climb up, and when I arrived at 
the top I was naturally somewhat tired. 
Then came the fight. I had on rubber- 
soled shoes, but they wouldn't seem to 
hold on the slippery roof, and time and 
again I had to grab at anything with my 
hands. Finally, in the course of the 
struggle, my feet went clear over the 
coping, and, by the merest luck, I caught 
the lightning-rod connection with one 
hand and held on long enough to be 
dragged back to safety. It was a pretty 
close call, and it may be readily under- 
stood that I was well content to take the 
rest of the day off. 

If there is anything that I am really 
proud of in my picture career, it is the 
fact that never in all the time I have 
spent before the camera have I made use 
of a "double." "Doubling," as you prob- 
ably know, is the putting in of some less 
high-priced player than the "star" to do 
a particularly hazardous bit of business, 
where the distance and conditions are 
such that the audience will not recognize 
the deception in the picture. This is a 
practice much in vogue by many direc- 
tors, for there are many "stars" who, 
altho most talented actors and actresses, 
simply cannot force themselves to go 
thru the nerve-racking ordeals ordered 
in some scenarios. As I said before, I 
do not take any personal credit to my- 
self for being able to go thru these 
"stunts." It is rather that I am made 
that way and should be unhappy with- 
out it. 

Most people who do my sort of work 
are fatalists. When I do a "stunt," I 
know that it may be my last, but dismiss 
that side of the question from my mind. 
What is to be is to be. I believe that I 
am going to do it successfully and attack 
each as it comes in that spirit, because if 
I fail it will in all likelihood be the last 
one that I shall ever do. This feeling 
is essential, and only those "stunt" 
actresses who possess it can ever hope 
to "arrive." 



A Tiny New Star 

Veta Searl, Who Until Quite Recently Had Adorned Neither Stage Nor Screen, 
11 Dissolves In " Upon the Magic Curtain 
Shadowland 




PLAYING 
HOOKEY 



eta Searl found 
an opportunity 
and grasped 
it. But first, oppor- 
j tunity found her in 
the form of a -pro- 
ducer-manager, who 
is by way of being a 
Columbus of the movies, 
when it comes to discov- 
ering embryo talent. He 
believes that the in- 
tangible something called 
personality, intelligence 
and an inherent sense 
of the fitness of things 
are the qualities that 
nake for prompt and 
asting screen success. 
These Miss Searl pos- 
sesses in abundance, 
so she has been en- 
to appear in 
"Charity," the first 
of the Frank Powell 
productions. 
She is of the popular 
type — small, piquant 
and alert, and is 
shaping her charms 
to win friends and 
success in the magic 
picture world she 
has so recently 
entered. 



VETA SEARL IN CHARACTER POSES THE FISHER-BOY 

63 




TAKING MOVIES IN BEETLE-LAND 



64 



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WWWlv$$$ \ ™f)\ 





Wallace Reid At Home 

By ELEANOR WARDALL 

Photo Illustrations by Stags 



IN the special post-office station at the 
studio of the Jesse L. Lasky Feature 
Play Company at Hollywood, Cali- 
fornia, the box for incoming mail, which 
bears the initial "R," is bigger than any 
other. The one next to it which yawns 
under a fancy "S" is seldom empty, it 
being thru this channel that hundreds 
of letters reach Blanche Sweet. But "R" 
is the biggest, as in that box, in a jumbled, 
upside-down, careless sort of manner, the 
office-boy tosses the mail addressed to 
Ridgely, Geo; Roberts, Theodore; Reid, 
Wallace. 

Wallace Reid in a day receives more 
letters from admiring film fans than the 
Governor of California receives from 

65 



office-seekers, and any one who knows 
anything about politics can readily ap- 
preciate the ratio in favor of Mr. Reid. 
Most of these letters are written in 
the familiar up-and-down-stub-pen-back- 
hand, bearing undeniably the stamp of 
feminine manumotion. 

The best of it, all is that Wally Reid 
(those who know him well call him 
"Wally," and those who know him very 
well call him "Wally," too) deserves all 
the nice things that are said about him 
in the letters which come from far and 
wide. Now, these letters play a very im- 
portant part in the daily life of this Lasky 
star, who only recently completed a 
special engagement, as leading man in 




WALLACE REID AND HIS WIFE BEING FOND OF ALL KINDS OF PETS, 

66 




SOMEBODY HAS TO TAKE CARE OF THEM, AND IT IS USUALLY WALLACE 

67 



WALLACE REID AT HOME 

support of Geraldine Farrar, in 
Cecil B. De Mille's gigantic pro- 
duction, "J oan °f Arc." 

Without mentioning any names, 
there are a lot of men film stars 
who read their letters in the se- 
clusion of their dressing-rooms, 
and none thereafter ever see "the 
light that lies in woman's eyes." 
But with Wally it is different. The 
general manager and correspond- 
ing secretary of the institution 
known as Wallace Reid, film star, 
is none other than Dorothy Dav- 
enport, otherwise known on the 
books of Hollywood merchants as 
Mrs. Wallace"' Reid. 

What stage or screen star is 
there who, for the purpose of 
public print — provided he or she 
is married — is not acclaimed the 
ideal wife or the model husband? 
The fact remains, however, that 
the domestic affairs of Wallace 
Reid and Dorothy Davenport, who 
met as Motion Picture players, 
wooed as gentle lovers and were 
married as film stars, come under 
such a classification without the 
possibility of contradiction. 

For the second time, Wallace 
Reid will vote at the Presidential 
election this autumn; He is twen- 
ty-five years old, six feet one-half 
inch with his shoes off, smooth- 
complexioned, blue-eyed, and drives 
an automobile with both hands. 
He was born in St. Louis and is 
the son of Hal Reid, noted writer 
of melodramas and more recently 
scenario writer for the Universal 
Company. Wally was educated at 
the New Jersey Military Academy 
and thereafter worked on a ranch 
in the West, ran a hotel, worked 
on the government survey of the 
Shoshone dam and rounded out a 
preliminary training as a reporter 
on the New York Evening Sun. 
Then he appeared in vaudeville 
in "The Girl and the Rancher," a 
sketch by his father, and about 
three years ago faced the camera 
for the first time, for the Selig 
Company. Subsequently he played 
with the Eastern Vitagraph 

68 




WALLACE REID IS SOMETHING OF A MUSICIAN, 




AND DOROTHY DAVENPORT IS HIS ABLE ASSISTANT 



WALLACE REID AT HOME 

Company opposite Florence Tur- 
ner, then with the Reliance East- 
ern Company, next with Universal, 
and just before joining the Lasky 
forces more than a year ago he 
appeared for D. W. Griffith. 

Wally Reid has done everything 
in Motion Pictures that a scenario 
writer can think of, including 
cowboy stunts, falls, fights, dives 
and even feminine impersonations. 
It was while Mr. Reid was play- 
ing with the Universal that he 
first met Miss Davenport, who is 
a niece of the famous Fanny 
Davenport, of Broadway note. 

Out at the Lasky studios they 
start work every morning at half- 
past eight o'clock. Down Selma 
Avenue, about 8.31, a low roadster 
speeds on its way in a race against 
time. About 8.32 a handsome 
youth walks thru the main en- 
trance to the studio, and at 8.33 he 
is at his place, talking to the di- 
rector with the air of one who has 
been ready for hours to start work. 
This is one of the characteristics 
of Wallace Reid — one of those 
characteristics which mark him 
eternally a boy, and one that has 
endeared him, not only to his as- 
sociates, but to the thousands who 
have caught the vitality of his 
character in his screen perform- 
ances. 

Turning back a page to the 
mail, it is usually delivered about 
11 a.m. by Sam, the official Lasky 
boy-scout. As he passes Wallace 
Reid's dressing-room, his load is 
considerably lightened. By in- 
struction and a personal contract, 
made binding by the passing of 
one dollar therewith received, Sam 
ties a little bundle securely, and 
when Wally starts for home it 
goes with him and is turned into 
the family desk as an item of 
household credit. Somehow or 
other, in the course of a busy day 
Miss Davenport finds time to an- 
swer the mail. 

Wallace Reid, during his ex- 
perience on the ranch, learnt the 
(Continued on page 162) 

69 




The AU-Around Man 

By PETER WADE 

a niche in the Edison Company, and in 
the bygone days of matinee idols — of 
prettily posing leading men — his niche 
grew dustier and narrower. 

"Dick" plodded on in his number 
twelve boots. "Surely," he opined, "my 
day will come." . It has. He is one of 
the busiest men in pictures. The day of 
the natural actor has dawned — the man 
whose homely face 
and awkward 
hands tell 
more of life, 
its sorrows 
and its sins, 
than the 
sleek poseur 
of the arti- 
ficial past. 

"Dick's" 



D 



ick" Neill 

wasn't born 

to be an ac- 
tor. He grew to be 
as big and sham- 
bling, as blunt- 
jawed and square- 
browed as "Abe" 
Lincoln. And he's 
downright homely in 
the bargain. 

"You'll never make 
an actor," his best friend 
said confidently, and big 
Dick's feelings were hurt 

But his ambition wasn't 
dampened. He gained a place on 
the stage, then shouldered himself into 




70 



Bio- 
graph, 
Kalem, 
Fox, 
Mirror and 
Metro — reads 
like a catalog ; 
"Dick" has been every- 
thing from juvenile to leading old man. 




11V 




& 



.#' 



>•<%>* 



*>. 



& 



* 6u~ 



& 






Take advise frum a feller wot knows, 
never get borned in to a famly of 
moven pikcher riters. our hole 
family was bugs about riten moven 
pikcher plays, a women accross the 
street frum us started the hole thing 
she rote a play and it was so good she 
solde it and got 8 dolars for it and perty 
soone every body on the street was trying 
to do the same thing. 

sis was the ferst wun in our famly to 
try it and she rote about 50 pages of 
mushy stuff and wanted me to try and 
act it out so she cud see how it wud go 
but i got all bum fuzzled up and cudnt 
do it and; she got mad and slapped my 
face, then her feller cum over and she 
wanted him to reed it and he did and 
then he laffed. sis got maddern a wet 
hen and sent him home and sed she never 



# # 



8 

4 



'*••»..** 



.<? 



wanted to see him agen cuz he laffed 
wen he hadnt sposed to laff cuz it was 
dramatik stuff and you aint sposed to laff 
at dramatik stuff. 

fred, thats my bruther he got it next 
and wun day he bought a tiperiter for 4 
dolars and brunged it home, it was sum 
mashine bleeve me it was perty nere 
reddy to fall to peeces and the ribon was 
all dried up but sis put some shoo blacken 
on it and it worked perty good, fred 
was gona rite indiun plays and about 
cow bovs and bandits and then after he 




72 



ABOUT OUR FAMILY 



got it rote he played it in the bak yard 
but wen he started to holler like a indiun 
a pleeceman cum and made him shut up. 
fred had a looloo of a job at a autermo- 
beel faktery but he tried to think up new 
idees for indiun plays durin workin hours 
and didnt do enurl work so the boss tide 
a can to him. then fred had to borro 
muney frum pa to buy stamps with so 
he cud send his indiun plays to the 
pikcher cumpanys. 



always burnt, wun day she put sum 
putatoes on to cook and then started to 
rite and for got the putatoes and they 
started to burn, the smoke begun to go 
out the bak door so fast that sum body 
terned in a alarm for fire and the ingines 
cum and skwirted water in the kichen and 
all over ma and ma got mad and told the 
fire men wot she thought of them for 
gettin water all over her moven pikcher 
play she was riten. 




"the ingines cum and skwirted water all over ma" 



ma sed if it was the stile for evry body 
to rite moven pikcher plays she was gona 
be in stile and she started in to. she 
cudnt use the tiperiter cuz she sed it was 
to much like playin the orgun and she 
never cud lern to play the orgun. she 
sed she was gona rite lift up plays or up 
lift plays i dont know whitch but she sed 
the public needed more plays with a 
morral. then i got mad. it wasnt so 
bad to act for sis and lissen to fred a 
yellin but after ma got the riten fever i 
didnt get ^ enurl to eet. wen she cooked 
beens she always for got them and they 



pa was next, he sed if he cudnt rite a 
better play then they was riten he wud 
jump in the" lake and he cant swim at 
that so he goes and buys a gallun of ink 
and a box of pens and hops to it. he sed 
he was gona rite a war play and try and 
teech the peeple that war wasnt a nice 
thing to hav around and that ther shud 
be less fiten and more peece in the wurld. 
he sed wen evry body wud giv evry body 
else a soft anser and never want to rite 
the wurld wud be like a pare of dice or 
sumthing like that, enyway he started to 
(Continued on page 160) 




KATHLYN WILLIAMS AND HER ARABIAN HORSE, "SULTAN ' 

Stones That Are True 



An Unexpected "Adventure of Kathlyn" 

By KATHLYN WILLIAMS 



While horseback riding, one day, I 
was overtaken by a heavy rain- 
storm, and sought shelter in a 
ramshackle farmhouse just off the main 
road. The farmer's folks made me wel- 
come and put up my horse in the barn. 
All the afternoon and evening the storm 
grew worse, and I was obliged to give 
up all hope of leaving that night. 

Bedtime came, and it became embar- 
rassingly evident that there would be no 
place for me to retire with any degree of 
privacy. Adventurous by nature as well 
as by profession, I announced my inten- 
tion of sleeping in the loft of the barn. 
The clean, sweet smell of the hay, cov- 
ered by the farm-wife's home-made quilts, 
quite appealed to me, and I was soon 
peacefully sleeping to the soothing ac- 
companiment of the rain on the roof. 

Suddenly a tremendous kicking and 
stamping below awoke me, and I heard 
my horse scampering thru the barn door. 
A mad search for my boots (and no one 



73 



knows what words of persuasion helped 
those damp riding-boots to go on) and 
in a jiffy I was down the loft-steps and 
in pursuit. 

Across ploughed fields, thru bogs, over 
fences, into puddles, I pursued that horse. 
The near-captures and discouragements 
of that chase were exasperating, but the 
beast got away, and stayed away. 
Drenched to the skin, I aroused the 
farmer's wife, to ask for a change of 
dry clothing. 

Accompanied by the farmer, who had 
been aroused by the commotion, I re- 
turned to the barn and announced my 
intention of seeing "how that horse came 
to get away, anyhow!" 

The emotions aroused by the subse- 
quent sight are not to be recorded. Be- 
fore my unbelieving eyes, revealed by the 
lantern the sleepy farmer carried, peace- 
fully munching his feed, stood my own 
bay horse! 

'Waal," said the rube, turning to ex- 



74 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



amine a broken halter in the next stall, 
"you've been out chasing my horse, an' 
I'm mighty sorry you're put out, but dont 



worry about my horse none — breaking 
out is a habit he's got, and he'll be back 
for his feed in the morning!" 



A Modern Eve and How She Tamed the Serpent 

By EDNA MAYO 



Ihad always heard that "music hath 
power to soothe the savage breast," 
but, while playing in "The Return 
of Eve," I found it to be literally true. 




regard whatever to, the wishes of the 
director and of his assistants, so, while 
they were trying to find a way to get the 
snake to do what they wanted it to do, 
I sat down and played a tune on my 
ukulele. I had not thought it would have 
any effect on the snake, but I had only 
played a few chords when the snake 
quieted down. I kept on playing 
for about fifteen minutes, and 
at the end of that time 
the snake was perfectly 
docile. It would 
lie quietly on 
the floor, hang 
from a 
limb. 



In one scene it was necessary to use 
a snake. It simply would not stay where 
we put it, but kept wriggling about the 
floor after the manner of snakes. And 
when we wanted it to hang by its tail 
from a limb, it wrapped itself about it 
instead of hanging. 

It showed a total disrespect for, and no 



or stay in any position we put it. 
It was my first experience as a snake- 
charmer, and I dont understand it. But 
the snake was evidently frightened by the 
strange surroundings of the studio, and 
the music seemed to have a soothing 
effect. Anyhow, we had no more trouble 
with it. 



A Real April-Fool Story 

By RUTH ROLAND 



Ihad it all framed up. When All 
Fools' Day came I was going to get 
good and even with Daniel Gil- 
feather, and would do something to 
Henry King. I was going to invite 
Lillian West to dinner and not be at 



home ! I would fix Edward Brady so 
that he would never play any more jokes 
on me. I would make life a burden for 
Director Henry Harvey — and there were 
others ! I had a good time thinking about 
it. Then came days and nights of hard 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



75 



work at a big serial. I was busy as a tug- 
boat and forgot all about it. 

I went home March thirty-first, worn 
to a frazzle. While I 
was getting into a 
kimono, the phone 
rang, and Director 
Harvey said, "I'm 
sorry, Miss Roland, but 
we must take those 
scenes at Salt Lake 
depot tomorrow. Can 
you make up at home 
and be there at six- 
thirty?" 

"Yes, indeed," I 
promised sweetly, and 
retired, forgetting that 
next day was the time 
planned to "get even*." 

Next morning the 
prettiest Salvation 
Army lassie you 
ever saw (it 
was the 
costume, of 
course 
not the 
face), 



dazzle. A 
fanned his 



HAROLD LOCKWOOD AND 
MARGUERITE CLARK 




a freight train from pure eye- 
sleepy drummer came to life, 
pockets for a two-bit piece, 
and started something. 
"A slight contribution, 
miss," he said. The las- 
sie, who had been looking 
about as tho in search 
of some one, blushed 
and smiled, and her con- 
fusion was increased by 
more men with more 
contributions. Her pro- 
tests were Unheeded, as 
the drummer seized her 
tambourine and passed 
it around among the ad- 
miring throng. 

As the tambourine was 
handed back to her, with 
a liberal contribution of 
coin and bills, a boy 
alighted from a 
train just com- 
ing in. "A 
message for 
you, Miss 
Roland," 
he said. 



banjo in hand, 

alighted from a 

runabout* at 

Salt Lake depot. The 

early birds took notice — 

a Salvation Army girl in a runabout, 

and such a pretty one, too! 

The policeman at tne corner woke up 
and touched his helmet. The baggage- 
man fell over a trunk and upset three 
cases of eggs, looking over his shoulder 
at the face framed in the poke bonnet. 
The telegraph operator nearly crabbed 
an important train order, and the switch 
crew narrowly escaped sending a big 



I tore open the 



■ message and read 



Miss Ruth Roland, 

Somewhere on Location. 

April Fool ! 

The Bunch. 

Ten minutes later the captain of the 
local Salvation Army was amazed at the 
entrance of a pretty girl in Salvation 
Army costume, who dumped a tambou- 
rine full of cash on his desk and fled 
without a word. 

"They got me," I admitted sadly, "and 
they got me good !" 




RUTH ROLAND ENJOYS ALL OUT-DOOR SPORTS, INCLUDING HUNTING, AND SHE IS 

A MIGHTY FINE SHOT 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



77 



Like Other Politicians, He Fooled the People 

By HAROLD LOCKWOOD 



While we were filming "Big Tre- 
maine," an amusing incident pre- 
sented itself, which goes to show 
that funny things do happen in our little 
world. 

In one of the scenes I was making a 
political address, in accordance with the 
scenario, surrounded, of course, by the 



usual audience of rubes of all ages and 
conditions. My speech was entirely im- 
promptu, and, among other rash state- 
ments, I said, "Elect me to Congress, and 
I will buy every one present a brand-new 
Ford !" This elicited great applause, but 
by the time the next scene was staged, 
and I had been elected to Congress, I had 




margu 

FROM 



ERITE COURTOT RECEIVES AND READS THE LETTER 
A SOLDIER-ADMIRER "SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE" 



completely forgotten 
all about it. 

However, one had 
not forgotten. A big, 
raw-boned Iowan sig- 
naled to me and said, 
"Say, mister, now that 
you have been elected 
to Congress, when do 
I get my Ford ?" Ap- 
preciating the humor 
of the situation, I sug- 
gested that he call on 
General Manager 
Fred J. Balshofer. 

The rube ap- 
proached Balshofer, 
who was especially 
busy at this time, and 
was soon told — well, 
he was soon told that 
he should never pay 
any attention to 
Motion Picture fo 1 k. 



78 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



A True Story of a Soldier Boy "Somewhere in France" 

By MARGUERITE COURTOT 



I receive a great many letters, but one 
day I received one from a 
soldier at the front, in 
France, asking for my photo- 
graph. Of course I was curi- 
ous, so when I sent the photo- 
graph it was accompanied by 
a letter asking him where he 
had seen me in pictures 

He answered, saying 
that loneliness had 
prompted him to 
write, also that he ' v . 
was not really a 
stranger, as he 
had spent 
a year 
around 



headed "Somewhere in France," I did 
not know where to write. I often 
thought of the poor boy far away in 
the trenches, and dreaded each day 
to look thru my mail, fearful of 
finding my returned letter. 
Well, one day it came — also the 
photo. My sorrow was great, 
and I cried bitterly for this 
poor boy who had given his 
life for France. It kept 
on my mind, and one 
day I wrote to a 
member of "our 
old Kalem 
family," 
injack- 
son- 




the Ka- 
lem stu- 
d i o s in 
Jacksonville, 
where he had 
often seen my 
mother, sister 
and self. He 
went on to say 
that he had made 
arrangements — in 
case he should be 
killed— that the let- 
ter I had written 
should be sent back 
to me. In that way 
I would know he 
was not living. 
The letter being 



Photo by Campbell 



ANITA STEWART 



ville, 
asking 
him to 
make i n- 
quiries about 
the boy. He an- 
swered that he 
had learnt that the 
young man came 
from a good fam- 
ily in London, was 
well educated, but 
had broken down 
from over study, left 
home, and came to 
America. At the 
outbreak of the war 
he had disappeared, 
and no one had heard 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



79 



from him. Having an aunt who is a 
member of the Red Cross in Geneva, 
Switzerland, I wrote her about the boy, 
asking her to make inquiries about him, 
and, if possible, to find where he had 
been buried. The other day I received 
a letter from her enclosing the reply to 
this letter of inquiry: 

Dear Mademoiselle : 

Your letter received. Private W (Wig- 
ham) is with us now and in the best of health. 



He has been informed of your communication, 
and has said that he will write to Miss Mar- 
guerite Courtot and explain. 
Yours truly, 

(Signed) (E. P. Snider), 

For Lieutenant-Colonel command- 
ing the Royal Canadian Regiment. 

Of course I was very happy at receiv- 
ing the good news, but I am still pa- 
tiently awaiting the letter of explanation 
from the firing-line. 



One Precious Experience 

By ANITA STEWART 



So you want to hear about an experi- 
ence which I hold dear in jmy 
precious chamber of memories? 
Well— let me think ■ 

Tucked away under a table in my 
dressing-room at the studio is a treasure- 
chest. Captain Kidd's kind of treasure- 
chest has gone out of style, but my kind 
has not. 

In this great, wicker chest there is 
nothing but letters, with a few articles 
scattered in between. These letters are 
my greatest treasures, for every one tells 
of some experience which I hold dear. 
But I am going to tell you about one in 
particular — a gift and a letter from a 
dear soul, whose appreciation and grati- 
tude have meant a great deal to me. 

This woman's husband was a heavy 
drinker. Every night he would stop in 
the lighted cafe at the corner and lose 
his manhood in the depths, of drink. Bit 
by bit he grew worse, until he was but 
a human wreck, with no desire for any- 
thing but the liquor, which would brace 
him up for a few hours and make him 
forget the troubles which it had caused. 
When he finally reached the little house 
she had tried to make a home, his earn- 
ings were gone, and he had nothing to 
offer her but abuse. 

One night the faithful wife met him 
on his way from work and pleaded with 
him to go with her to the Moving Pic- 
tures, instead of meeting the men as he 



was in the habit of doing. The earnest- 
ness of her tone and the appeal in her 
eyes won him, and he shuffled up to the 
box-office and bought two tickets. 

The little woman went on to write, in 
her tear-blotted letter, that she hadn't 
noticed the picture or the star advertised 
on the bill-boards outside. But when the 
lights went out the screen announcement 
read, 'The Painted World," and soon she 
felt that something had prompted her to 
bring her husband that especial night. 

I shall always feel that my work is 
worth while, even tho I never accomplish 
another thing, for the letter told me that 
my characterization in the picture awak- 
ened in the poor man a desire to win back 
his self-respect. The point had been 
brought home to him — he was following 
a dangerous course, and he must turn 
back before it was too late. 

It was a hard fight for him — a desper- 
ate struggle — but gradually he became 
master of himself. Now the happy wife 
and he attend the Moving Pictures as 
often as their slim purse will allow, for 
they feel that they owe them a debt of 
gratitude. 

The dear little woman wanted to thank 
me for what she thought I had done for 
them, so she sent me the letter that tells 
this story and an old, worn prayer-book. 
And so, dear friends, this is one of the 
experiences which my work on the screen 
has given me, which I hold, oh, so dear ! 



Interesting ■ Popular 

Xtem^=<a^9^X layers 



How Fay Tincher 

ORIGINATED THE 
STRIPED SKIRT. 



Mary Pickford & Owen Moore: 

"MAKING UP" 

AFTER A QUARREL. 




Roscoe Arbuckle has a powerful 
restraining influence over his director 



Charlie 

IS INTERESTED 
I IN POETRY 




AXTOXIO MORENO 



PEGGY HYLAXD 



BOBBY COXXELLY 




Her Right to Live 

By DOROTHY DONNELL 

This story was written from the Photoplay of PAUL WEST 



"| almost caught a fis' !" Benny's line 
J[ jerked ecstatically. 

"I almost saw it!" beamed Polly, 
patting the small, chubby cheek nearest 
her, mother-wise. 

''Pooh!" — Jimmy's tone was scornful 
— ''I guess I en almost catch a bigger 
fish 'n you, Benny Biggs ! I guess I c'd 
almost catch a — whale, if one 'd come 
a-swimmin' into this pond. Your fish 
wasn't nothin' but a minnow!" 

"Is they whales in this pond, Polly?" 
wailed small Janet, with an awed glance 
at the peaceful lily-pads lying steeped in 
the sunshine. Janet's was a feminine 
soul, helpless to cope with the stern 
things of life — spiders and mice and 
whales. "I wouldn't come a step if I'd 
'sposed they was." 

"Of course there isn't any whales !" 
said PoIIy, with the suoerior wisdom of 



her sixteen years. She sat dabbling one 
shoeless, stockingless foot in the pleasant 
coolness of the water, with all the de- 
light of a child, but the small, eager face 
in the frame of dusky curls was curiously 
older than its years. "Whales live in — 
in Africa with the monkeys an' the Es- 
kimos an' — an' the banana-trees." 

Reassured by this remarkable bit of 
information, Janet returned to her fish- 
ing, with a concentration of effort that 
necessitated the placing of her tongue in 
one cheek. Jimmy rubbed a reflective 
hand wistfully across his small stomach. 

"Gee!" he sighed, "I wist we had a 
banana-tree in our back yard. Bananas 
is awful fill in'." 

The face of the oldest child — for at 
sixteen one is still a child — grew strained 
and anxious. The willow-pole slid from 
her hands. 



81 



82 



HER RIGHT TO LIVE 



''Jimmy Biggs !" cried Polly, in tremu- 
lous wrath, "I wish you'd keep your 
mind out o' your stomach ! You ought 
to be thankful for bread an' potatoes. 
I'd a heap rather them than — than tur- 
key, if Uncle Daniel had to buy it. 
Mean, hateful, stingy old thing !" 

The young man beyond the screen of 
willows looked up from his clandestine 
sketching of the pretty scene, curious at 
the sudden change in the girl's voice. 
"The kid sounds good and mad!" he 
murmured, amusedly. "Wonder who's 
been stealing her lollipop." His hand 
went involuntarily into his pocket. John 
Oxmore was the sort of young man 
whom lost and mangy curs invariably 
follow, whom old ladies adore and chil- 
dren trust. But his well-meant impulses 
received a severe blow on this occasion. 
Polly met his friendly smile with a stern- 
ness that speedily rendered it apologetic, 
even embarrassed. 

"I didn't mean to bother," said the in- 
terloper, meekly. On second thought he 
replaced in his trousers pocket the quar- 
ter he had been on the point of proffer- 
ing. "I'm John Oxmore, dubbing away 
at painting, and — I was sketching you 
kids " 

"Kids?" said Polly, haughtily, draw- 
ing herself up to her full four-foot-ten 
with quite a superb air, slightly marred 
by the one stockingless, white foot; "the 
others may be, but I'm a young lady, and 
the niece of Mayor Daniel Hoadley, even 
if I do hate him!" 

Then, recalled to her shoeless state by 
bringing her foot energetically down on 
a sharp stone in a tempersome stamp, 
Polly lost her hauteur suddenly and col- 
lapsed in a little heap on the moss. 

John's eyes twinkled, but his tone was 
grave enough and his bow respectful 
enough to appease any young lady. 

"Arid I'm the son of the man who's 
going to beat your esteemed uncle this 
next election, even if I dont hate you!" 

He allowed the suppressed chuckle to 
find its way out in a hearty laugh as he 
left the quaint little group at a safe dis- 
tance. 

"A darn plucky little kid, that girl!" 
he thought appreciatively. "How her 
eyes flashed! I bet she makes a good- 
looker when she grows up. Niece of 



Hoadley — they must be the kids of that 
sister of his who married against old 
Dan's wishes. Seems as tho I'd heard 
the father died a while back and they 
were poor as church-mice." His laugh- 
ing look sobered. "The old skinflint and 
crook!" he muttered heartily; "all they'll 
ever get from him is advice, and that's 
poor eating. Bad brother, rotten politi- 
cian, coward and cad, and yet a clean, 
fine man like my father is going to have 
a tough pull to beat him, I'm afraid." 

"If he'd had on a plumy, red hat in- 
stead of that derby," Polly was reflecting 
at this moment, while she hastily pulled 
on her stocking and shoe, "and a gold- 
satin coat with lace ruffles, he'd have 
looked exactly like the Prince in the 
fairy-book. Kids I" She sprang to her 
feet with another stamp of Jier small foot. 
"Well, anyhow, I'll never see him again, 
so what do / care ? Come on, children ; 
let's go home." 

She could not guess, poor, little, anx- 
ious mother-child, how soon she was to 
see him again, or under what changed 
circumstances. It is a part of God's 
great wisdom that, tho we may look be- 
hind at past events, we may not open the 
locked door of the Future ever so little. 
The earth would be depopulated if its 
peoples could see the moments to come 
and the rivers and oceans choked with 
the self-slain. 

So Polly could not guess that the bright 
little home would so soon be broken up; 
that the anxious, grieving spirit of the 
widowed mother would slip away from 
her little brood, leaving her mantle of 
responsibility to lie heavily on Polly's 
straight, sixteen^year-old shoulders. But 
within two months this had come to 
pass, and the four children, with no bag- 
gage save two crayoned pictures of their 
father and mother, stood forlornly in the 
great, cheerless drawing-room of Daniel 
Hoadley's showy home. 

"Goodness gracious, Dan, this is really 
too much !" fretted Mrs. Hoadley, with 
cold vexation in her light-blue eyes, as 
she surveyed the unwelcome visitors. 
"What on earth you expect me to do 
with a parcel of brats under foot I cant 
imagine !" 

"My dear, it is absolutely necessary, 
until after election, anyway," the Mayor 



HER RIGHT TO LIVE 



83 



said grimly. His glance at his nephews 
and nieces was no warmer or kindlier 
than hers, but he brought his heavy jaws 
together grimly. "Put up with 'em till 
I'm re-elected, then we'll see. It would 
be bad policy to turn 'em away now. 
Some whining, puling sob-writer would 
be sure to get hold of it and -make an 
issue out of it." 

Political expediency was the clock 
which regulated the lives of the Hoad- 
leys. Harriet Hoadley, hard of eye, thin- 
nostriled, but with the sensual lips of a 
pleasure-lover, always yielded to the 
argument of 
policy ; but she 
did it now 
with - poor 
grace. 

"W e 1 1, 
since you're 
here, you 
can make 
yourself as 
useful as 
you can," 
she told Pol- 
ly, angrilv. 
"Cook 
needs help 
in the 
kitchen 
with the 
dish - wash- 
ing, and so 
on. Heavens 
above ! what 
is that miserable little wretch doing ?" 

Benny, having regarded his new rela- 
tives with profound and wide-eyed dis- 
approval as long as he saw fit, had turned 
his attention to a small vase on a near-by 
table. At the shrill exclamation, his in- 
secure fingers lost their grip, and the 
vase crashed to the polished floor in a 
dozen pieces. Mrs. Hoadley sprang for- 
ward with upraised hand, but Polly was 
before her. She lifted a white face over 
Benny's head, clutched to her breast. 

"Whenever the children do something 
you dont like," she said breathlessly — "if 
you've got to hit any one, you can hit 
me !" 

It was not physical hurts that bruised 
Polly's spirit in the weeks that followed, 
as she toiled in her uncle's kitchen, 



nagged by the cook, her slender, immature 
strength strained to the uttermost with 
piles of greasy dishes and never-ending 
pots and pans. 

"If it wasn't for the children, I 
wouldn't stay only long enough to take 
off this apron," she thought rebelliously, 
"with her rubbing it in every day how 
much she's doing for us and how thank- 
ful we ought to be to her for keeping us 
out o' the poorhouse." A faintly whim- 
sical smile struggled on her lips. "Seems 
as tho the poorhouse would be homier 
than this, anyhow!" 

But, for the sake of bread and milk 

for Benny, and bread and meat for 

Jimmy and Janet, Polly faced her 

hard days gallantly and 

toiled patiently, 

comforting 

her fierce 

pride by 

the thought 

that she 




"IF YOU'VE GOT TO HIT HIT MB/' 



was earn- 
i n g her 
own way 
at least. 
And then, 
one day, 
Cinderella 
met the 
Prince 
again. 
It was on the 
street, as Polly 
was returning 
from an errand at the market, and John 
Oxmore's frank face flashed into boy- 
ish admiration as he looked down at 
her. Daniel Hoadley's political com- 
mon-sense had resulted in the purchase of 
new, prosperous-looking clothes for all 
the children, and Polly, in her trim, 
brown suit, with its lengthened skirt and 
the fur at throat and wrists, made a 
pleasant picture for a young man's eyes. 
"Bless my soul!" cried John, flushing 
and laughing, "if you aren't a young lady, 
after all ! I wonder if you wouldn't for- 
give me for my break last spring and let 
me call on you?" 

Polly's heart beat fast. A rosy color 
sprang to her cheeks, and she cast down 
her eyes, as instinct prompted her. 
"Aunt Hoadlev and Uncle Hoadlev de- 



84 



HER RIGHT TO LIVE 



test your father," she said thoughtfully, 
"but I dont see how they could object 
to — you. I should be — honored to have 
you call." 

The prim words brought a smile to 
John's lips, but his eyes were strangely 
soft and gentle as he turned away. 

"She'll be a stunner when she grows 
up," he thought, with an odd stir of 
tenderness in his heart. "I wonder — " 

Her aunt regarded Polly's flushed, 
shining face sourly, as a faded woman 
often regards youth and prettiness. The 
girl was actually daring to turn out a 
beauty. As soon as the election was 
safely over she would send her and the 
rest of them packing. She listened to 
Polly's breathless tale of her meeting 
with John, with narrowing eyes. 

"Indeed, and you will not receive calls 
from the son of the man who's slander- 
ing your uncle !" she snapped at the end. 
"And what's more, you're not a society 
lady to receive visitors in the parlor. 
Your place is the kitchen, and any callers 
you may have can make their calls out 
there !" 

Every ring at the bell during the next 
few days brought Polly's heart to her 
throat, but no tall, handsome Prince-in- 
a-derby appeared, and her hopes grad- 
ually sank. Not as a young lady re- 
sentful at the neglect of a suitor was 
Polly. Her grief was that of a child 
who has begun to lose faith in her be- 
loved fairy-tales. 

"If I had a godmother to turn this 
dress into purple velvet !" she mused, over 
her dishpan, one afternoon, looking wist- 
fully down at the faded gingham which 
Mrs. Hoadley's common-sense prescribed 
for all times when there were no votes 
to be lost by its wearing; "but I 
guess princes these days cant see thru 
disguises." 

When the door-bell rang now across her 
thoughts, she answered it herself. It 
was the butler's afternoon off, but her 
aunt's directions had not included kitchen 
apron and dish-towel carried across her 
arm. 

The visitor was Boss Hawkins, one 
of Hoadley's political henchmen, and, 
among other things, a connoisseur in 
feminine beauty. His bold, greedy little 
eyes noted the apron and dish-towel as 



well as the winsome face in its frame of 
dusky hair. They gave him courage to 
press the pretty servant-maid for a kiss. 

"Just one smack from those red lips, 
darling," he urged jocosely, thrusting 
his heavy, congested face close to her 
terrified one. "Come on; dont be shy, 
little girt, or I'll' have to help myself!" 

"Oh," said . Polly, indignantly, "you 
horrid, fat old man, how can you!" 

And she gave him a violent shove. 
Hawkins' small eyes grew red ; he 
laughed unpleasantly, and caught the 
struggling little figure close in his thick, 
muscular arms. From the doorway be- 
hind him John Oxmore took in the situa- 
tion at a single, indignant glance. With 
remarkable promptness, he doubled-up a 
hard fist and drove it into Hawkins' 
flabby cheek with some one hundred and 
sixty pounds of cordial intention behind 
it. The ward boss's bellow of pain and 
fury brought Hoadley himself into the 
hall, to find his henchman rubbing a pur- 
ple cheek and glaring, tho at a cautious 
distance, at an entirely self-possessed 
young man. 

"I'll get you for this — see if I dont !" 
howled Hawkins. "I'll— I'll " 

He choked with rage, and the sight of 
Hoadley looking on ironically from the 
door of his library added fuel to the 
flame. But he was a politician, too. He 
had come on a political errand which 
was quite likely to infuriate his employer 
enough without quarreling over side 
issues. So he turned his back upon his 
discomfiture and went into the library, 
still rubbing his cheek sullenly. 

Polly and her rescuer faced each other, 
and the girl caught a swift look of sur- 
prise and distrust in John's glance. She 
followed his eyes to the dish-towel and 
the apron, and suddenly a flood of bitter- 
ness washed over her soul. He thought 
she had deceived him — that she was a 
servant. Without a word, she turned 
and fled down the hall and into the 
kitchen, where she stood, trembling and 
tearless, until she had heard the front 
door open and close. Then she burst 
into a storm of tears — child-tears of re- 
sentment, girl-tears of disappointment, 
woman-tears of grieved pride. 

"We wont stay!" she thought. "The 
poorhouse couldn't be any worse than 






HER RIGHT TO LIVE 



85 



this ; it's honester, anyway. We'll go — 
tonight, after they've gone out." 

Benny, Jimmy and Janet looked at 
their sister with puzzled eyes, as she 
gathered them about her that evening. 

"Children," said Polly, solemnly, "we're 
going to vote about something. It's very 
important, so I guess you'd better take 
out your chewing-gum, 
Jimmy — you can 
think better. Now, 
listen — all of you. 
Would you 
rather stay here, 
or go to the 
poorhouse ? 
Think care- 
fully." 

The three 
sniall faces 
screwed 
themselves 
into strange 
contortions 
under the 
strain of 
thought. 
"Ready?" 
Poll y's 
voice was 
tense with 
anxietv. 
'Then, all 
in favor 
of the 
poorhouse 
will hold 
up their 
hands." 

Three 
hands, soiled 
but enthusi- 
astic, waved 
in the air. 
Three small 
voices rose in a shrill cheer, 
house! Hooray!" 

"It's a vote!" said Polly, drawing a 
long breath. "Get your hats on, and 
dont do it noisily. They dont want us to 
stay, but they'd hate for us to go — till 
after election." 

That night was an eventful one in the 
history of the city. There was hardly 
room enough in the next morning's paper 
to chronicle all the excitements, the 




IT WAS NOT DRUDGERY TH 



"The poor- 



thrills, the horrors and discoveries of the 
dark hours. But among the accounts of 
the burning of the city almshouse, and 
the finding of Boss Hawkins' dead bodk- 
in the back room of Joe's saloon, there 
was no mention of the most momentous 
discovery of all. 

John Oxmore had passed a harassing 
evening. 

His father's election was 
heavy on his mind, and 
even the joys of watch- 
ing the almshouse 
burn — all mankind 
being boys when 
there is a fire — 
had not light- 
ened his spirits. 
When a hand 
had fallen on his 
arm, therefore, 
as he stood in 
the fire-crowd, it 
seemed the per- 
fectly natural 
thing to find 
the bruised, 
unprepo.fr- 
s e s s i n g 
counte- 
nance of 
Boss Haw- 
kins at his 
elbow, be- 
cause he 
had just 
been think- 
ing of him. 
"All's for- 
got 'n' for- 
g i v en," 
Hawkins 
said, gestur- 
at bruised her spirit ing to his cheek. 

His small eyes 
were eager with some secret covet- 
ousness ; he spoke persuasively. "If you 
want a tip on how t' swing th' election 
t' your father," he whispered — "Hoadley 
'n' me broke this afternoon — I c'n give 

it t' you — if it's worth my while " 

Followed a half-hour's heated argu- 
ment in a back room of Joe's saloon, a 
rendezvous insisted on by Hawkins, from 
which John plunged into the cool, clean 
dark as a swimmer into the water, out- 




HE LAUGHED UNPLEASANTLY AND CAUGHT THE STRUGGLING LITTLE FIGURE CLOSE 

IN HIS ARMS 



raged, sick at heart at the rottenness of 
political methods, leaving the baffled 
Hawkins chewing his moustache in silent 
discomfiture that the young man had not 
cared to buy his aid, after all. 

The walk thru the woods to the little 
bungalow, where he slept and dreamed 
impossible dreams and painted improb- 
able pictures, cleared the mists of anger 
from John's brain, and he was in a cheer- 
ful frame of mind when he unlocked the 
door, flung it open, then paused, aghast, 
on the threshold. 

'Tor the love of Mike!" he gasped. 
"Look who's here!" 

"Sh-sh !" warned Polly, matter-of- 
factly. She tiptoed toward him, finger 
on lips. "They're all asleep on the couch. 
I've tied 'em on. Is this your house? 
I'm glad. It doesn't seem so awful to 
burgle a house you've been introduced 
to!" 

John Oxmore leaned feebly against the 



86 



door- jamb, regarding the resolute little 
brown figure with dazed eyes. "Of 
course I'm glad to see you," he mur- 
mured, with a jaunty attempt at polite- 
ness, "and it was awfully good of you 
to make yourself at home ; but, if you'll 
pardon my denseness, why did you 
choose this hour for a visit " 

He pointed to the clock, whose hands 
stood together at one. Polly laughed 
softly. 

"The poorhouse burned down," she 
explained, "so we couldn't stay there, and 
then we found this dear, darling little 
house, and I climbed in the window " 

Standing very close, she poured out 
the story of the night, and the young 
man listened, eyes intent on the small, 
vivid face. And he was conscious, as he 
listened, of a deep desire to take the 
dauntless little figure in his arms and kiss 
the trembling lips till they smiled. 

But he restrained himself. Later, 




ALL IN FAVOR OF THE POORHOUSE HOLD UP THEIR HANDS'' 



after Polly had been installed in the bed- 
room and he had collected a heap of 
cushions and rugs for his own couch on 
the piazza floor, he lay and looked up 
at the stars with an awed sense of being 
a new, different man in a different, new 
world. 

"Why, I love her !" he marveled, "and 
I thought she was only a kid ! But she's 
a woman — the dearest, bravest little 
woman in the world, and I'm going to 
tell her so tomorrow, after I get her back 
to her uncle's — — " 

He almost told her before he left the 
next morning. In everything but words 
he did tell her, but he managed to force 
himself away before he had spoken. The 
last he saw, as he glanced back, was her 
laughing face rising out of a swirl of 
little, waving arms and bobbing heads, as 
—the thought throbbed in his soul — per- 
haps he should see her stand some day 
among their children, if God was kind. 

And Polly's eyes, watching him go, 
were woman-eyes. Never, from that day, 
would she be a child again. 

"He will come back," throbbed her 
thoughts ;" he is the Prince ; he is hand- 



87 



some, and good, and honorable, and — 
oh, I think he is mine !" 

But the Prince did not come back. 
Instead, at noon, her uncle drove up, with 
a face from which she shrank in terror. 
His words frightened her more than his 
look. 

"Were you here alone last night?" he 
questioned sternly. 

"Why, no," she faltered. "Mr. Ox- 
more came at one o'clock by that clock 
there. We were perfectly safe then." 

"Safe!" her uncle laughed harshly — 
"safe from everything but scandal and 
shame. Polly, you must not breathe a 
word of his being here to any one. It 
would ruin your reputation." 

"I'm not ashamed!" cried Polly. "I 
haven't done % anything wrong, and he 
couldn't. No one would believe it of 
him." 

At that her uncle had laughed longer 
and louder than before — a dreadful laugh 
— and bade her and the children get into 
the car and come home. Then, almost 
as soon as they had reached home, they 
started out again with Aunt Hoadley, 
and bags and baggage, and took a train 




HAWKINS ATTEMPTS TO SELL OUT TO JOHN OXMORE 



that 'carried them far out into the coun- 
try, where they spent two dull weeks in 
a lonely farmhouse that was queerly like 
a prison. 

Polly rebelled vigorously, but her aunt 
was obdurate. They were going to stay 
here until after election, and there was 
no use in complaining. Then, one day, 
as Polly was cutting out paper-dolls 
from an old newspaper, she discovered 
the reason why she was being kept on the 
farm. 

Three hours later a wild little figure 
ran into the crowded courtroom, where 
John Oxmore, son of the reform candi- 
date for Mayor, was being tried for the 
murder of Boss Hawkins in Joe's saloon 
on the night of the almshouse fire. The 
prisoner sat, very white and stern, jaw 
grimly set under the young skin. The 
trial was going against him — his blood- 
stained cane, picked up beside the body, 
had evidently made a deep impression on 
the jury ; Hoadley 's testimony as to the 
quarrel of the two in his presence on the 
afternoon of the murder had added to the 
weight of evidence against him, and 



88 



worst of all was the prisoner's inability 
to prove an alibi — he had absolutely re- 
fused to tell where he was on the night 
of the crime. 

The case was almost ready to go to the 
jury, when the lawyer for the defense 
arose and asked leave to put a new wit- 
ness on the stand. 

"A witness who has been concealed 
during the trial by — Daniel Hoadley, her 
uncle !" the lawyer said impressively. A 
deep silence lay across the courtroom as 
Polly took the oath and turned to the 
judge, the small face under the shabby 
hat stamped with the fear of the last 
hours, yet shining with the light that 
never was on land or sea. 

Daniel Hoadley sat forward in his 
chair, face dreadful to see. In the pris- 
oner's box John Oxmore rose slowly to 
his feet. 

"Judge," said Polly, clearly, "I can tell 
you where John Oxmore was on the 
night of the murder. He would not tell 
for fear of shaming me, but I will tell 
you. He was in his own bungalow, and 
I know it, because I was there, too." 




POLLY DISCOVERS THAT HER PRINCE IS ON TRIAL FOR MURDER 



In straight, simple words, she told her 
story — the story that cleared her lover 
and went far, later, in convicting her 
uncle of the murder of the man he feared 
to trust, with the cane John had left in 
the saloon. At the end she turned from 
the judge, so that the whole courtroom 
saw the look of her face. 

"He was willing to die to save my 
name," she said quietly. "After that, 



none of you can believe anything wrong 
or cruel or low of him." 

She went down the steps into the 
courtroom, head proudly high, and at the 
foot of them John Oxmore met her and 
took her, before every one, into his arms. 
For, moonlight or sunlight, courtroom or 
crowded street or quiet garden, Love 
serenely chooses his own time and! place 
and makes them beautiful. 




L'Art Nouveau 

(A sonnet to the art of Cinematography) 
By GERALDINE COORS 

nee there were days, golden and memoried days, 
When gifted men immortalized their dreams 
In song and ode — in literary gleams 

Of things on which the mind alone could gaze. 

Their thoughts they could not put in stilted plays; 
They needed nature: flowers, sunlit streams, 
The sky, the sea, the hidden wand that seems 

To touch with life what was a beauteous haze. 

They found it — the new art — the art revealed 
Thru latent genius, ne'er to be destroyed. 

Ah, what imagery can lie concealed 
Within one slender strip of celluloid! 

Dreams that have dimmed in lustre glow again, 
Reincarnated in the hearts of men! 
89 




WmL^ 



To My Movie Queen 

By DOROTHY HUGHES 

As you passed me on the street you thrilled me thru, 

For I'd seen your lovely face before, I knew; 

I remembered visions of you in the past, 

Then I discovered where I'd seen you last: 

When you were Cleopatra on the Nile, 

You entranced me and enthralled me with your smile; 

With your wondrous grace you set my heart aflame, 

As a haughty, powdered-haired Colonial dame; 

When you were a shy, demure Quaker maid, 

My heart, in worship, at your feet I laid — 

I recognize you now, my Movie Queen, 

For I've seen you in these parts upon the screen. 

90 



Vive la Social Accomplishment — 
the Limerick! 

Dancing, Cards, Phonographs to the Contrary, the Literary Lion May Still 

Show His Teeth 

In Turkey they are not very strong on social accomplishments — the dinner-dance is 
the thing. The dancers are strictly cabaret (sans corsets and stockings), and the 
dinner is all cut up for you in advance and set forth in generous bowls. Your 
accomplishment consists in dipping into the bowl, rolling up a ball of food and pop- 
ping it into your seat-mate's mouth. When guests get hurried or hilarious and begin 
popping at random, the portions often miss their mark. That's the reason they 
wear veils and dont have wall-paper in the effete East. 

In gay Gotham it's different, of a sort. Brains are in competition with the Great 
White Way — theaters, cabarets, the dansants — a thousand-and-one distractions; con- 
sequently no one has ever found time to cultivate The Graces, or wouldn't listen if 
they had. 

Parlor tricks are at a premium in the cities. When forced to stay indoors, it's 
a common and pitiful sight to see a company of guests try to amuse themselves by 
taking turns sitting on a beer-bottle and in seeing how many knots they can tie in 
a string, without coming a cropper. 

This brings us around to the Limerick. It's the neatest, nippiest, wittiest kind 
of brain-rainbow. And at one time in the Limerick Editor's recollection verses came 
to people so readily that they took turns sitting down to the piano and composing 
them to popular airs. If you want to be a Turk or an emasculated Gothamite, go 
ahead— it's your own funeral — but if you need an accomplishment that tingles the 
giver and the taker with equal pleasure, try to concoct a few Limericks. 

Each month we dispense portions of $5 and $3 and four tidbits of $1 each for 
the brightest Limericks about photoplays and players. We illustrate, too, all we have 
room for. Try some — see how they tickle your brain-palate — and then send them 
steaming in to us ! _ The prizes, this month are served to the following Literary Lions 
in the order named: Mary E. Rouse, Len Ketchum, Adeline H. Sperry, Albert Deane, 
Frederick Wallace, and Harry J. Smalley. 

NOT SO FAT AS HE'S 
PAINTED! 1... 

It is said that the versatile 
Morey, 
No matter how trite be the story. 
Can add a few frills 
And a couple of thrills, 
And daub his escutcheon with 
glory ! 

Frederick Wallace. 
Bristol, Conn. 



ME, TOO ! 

Are you red-haired and mar- 
ried? Oh, Francis! 
So I've heard, but I hope they're 
romances. 
Anyway, while the screen 
Shows Bushman, I ween 
I cant parry his heart-smashing 
glances ! L. Carver. 

92a E. Linden Av., Atlanta, Ga. 
91 





HARRY MOREY 



FRANCIS BUSHMAN 



92 



VIVE LA SOCIAL ACCOMPLISHMENT— THE LIMERICK! 

A PERSONAL EQUATION. 

A vampire villainess she, 
As wicked as wicked can be; 
But you bet, all the same, 
I'm willing and game — 
She can vamp all she wants to with me! 
Harry J. Smalley. 
1207 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



cv-v^ 




A HEAVEN ALL HIS OWN! 

Charlie boy, you are not just a Ray 
From bright Movie Land's star- 
gemmed highway ! 
You fade Venus or Mars, 
Or a whole group of stars — 
You're the "son" that keeps fans on the 
sway ! 

Day C. Julian. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 

SWEETHEARTS THAT PASS IN 
THE NIGHT. 

Crane Wilbur is the hero of my heart; 
In all my dreams he plays the lead- 
ing part. 
Dont s'pose we'll ever speak a word, 
'N' my lovin' him may be absurd — 
Gosh-durn that careless Cupid with his 
dart! 

Eveleen Ketchum. 
439 E. 46th St., North, Portland, Ore. 




CRANE WILBUR 



VIVE LA SOCIAL ACCOMPLISHMENT— THE LIMERICK! 



93 



NO "HAREM SCAREM "? 

''-pis a pity that fair Billie Burke 
1 Was ever permitted to work; 
She is so full of wiggles 
And syrupy giggles 
She would gladden the soul of a Turk ! 
Adeline H. Sperry. 
612 E. 11th Ave., Denver, Colo. 



WHICH ONE? 
an "ingenue" each 



of 



you 



THERE 
knows, 
Forty-two, as the birth record shows ; 
Her voice is a squeak, 
And her poor old joints creak, 
But she photographs well, I suppose (?) 
Len Ketchum. 
439 E. 46th St., North, Portland, Ore. 

HELLO, DIMPLES! 

There once was a most charming fellow, 
Who played on our hearts like a 
'cello ; 
With his dimples and smile, 
He left us for a while — 
He's back ! Howdy, Maurice Costello ! 
Mary E. Rouse. 
1942 Warren Ave., Chicago, 111. 





MAURICE COSTELLO 



EDNA PURVIANCE 

LAUGH AND GROW A SHAPE! 

You'd think with rough Charlie a-grap- 
plin', 
She'd wear herself thin as a saplin'; 
But her weight seems to gain, 
And the reason is plain, 
From giggling so much at C. Chaplin ! 
Harry J. Smalley. 
1207 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

I'M FEELING "VERSE," DOCTOR! 

We're suff'ring from Limerickitus, 
But the diagnosis cant excite us ; 
Tho after each verse 
We are sure to get worse, 
If there's any known cure, please dont 
write us ! 

Day C. Julian. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 

HARD ON THE BACHELORS! 

All I can say is gol-darn um ! 
I mean such fellows as Farnum; 
They steal every girl, 
Now we're glad of a whirl 
With a freak that's left over by Barnum ! 
M. Lee Stevens. 
1394 O'Farrell St., San Francisco, Cal. 



94 



VIVE LA SOCIAL ACCOMPLISHMENT— THE LIMERICK! 




EDNA COULDN'T KEEP A SJECRET. 

Edna Mayo's a beautiful maid, 
But the "props" thatj as Eve, she 
displayed, 
Showed that Edna, gadzooks ! 
Is supported by crooks — - 
And the best of her friends were dis- 
mayed ! Len Ketchum. 
439 E. 46th St., North, Portland, Ore. 

A CURE FOR A GROUCH. 

Whenever you're feeling real blue, 
Spend a dime, go and see Sidney 
Drew; 
You will laugh till you bust, 
But see him you must, 
For he's there with the goods quite a few- 
M. H. Toner. 
533 E. 144th St., New York, N. Y. 

CHARLES "SPENCER" CHAPLIN 

Have you tried his new name on your 
fiddle- 
That one he has jammed in the middle? 
It may be an ad, 
But at that it aint bad — 
What that kid'll do next is a riddle! 

Harry J. Smalley. 
1207 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



IF HE MURDERED YOU, YOU'D 
APOLOGIZE ! 

Abroad, smiling face and a grin, 
A laugh that gives health to the thin, 
And if there's a fight, 
You can bet you'll be right 
If you back Douglas Fairbanks to win ! 
Albert Deane. 
500 George St., Sydney, Australia. 

PLAYING TRICKS ON THE 
CAMERA. 

Miss Ward, I admit you're uncanny, 
And you sure have got hold of my 
nanny; 
You confess you're two score, 
Yet look sixteen, no more; 
Pray, how do you do it, Fanny? 

Bessie Janover. 
229 Madison St., New York City. 




CHARLES SPENCER CHAPLIN 




THOMAS CHATTERTOxM ON HIS RANCH 



A Farmer of the Films 



By MOSGROVE COLWELL 



Thomas 'Chatterton can raise a 
rough-house with the villain on the 
screen. On his ranch he raises al- 
falfa. Between the two he has raised a 
bank account with which he intends to 
raise more alfalfa to feed to cattle to 
sell to raise more alfalfa to feed to more 
cattle to sell — so that when he quits the 
pictures his ranch will be equally 
profitable. 

In other words, "Breezy Tom" Chat- 
terton, hero of the American serial, "The 
Secret of the Submarine," and one of the 
stand-bys of the studio at Santa Barbara, 
is a landed proprietor, with five hundred 
acres of fertile California soil as his 
domain and that of a relative who has 
invested with him. On the historic Sac- 
ramento River, in northern California, 
twelve miles from the little town of 
Chico, is a broad expanse of field, 
meadow and wooded land which Tom 
can call his own and look at a mortgage 
blank without shuddering. 

Chatterton has been acquiring his 
ranch for several years, and now it is in a 
condition where returns are coming from 
it. There are many blooded dairy cows, 
a pen of hogs which will bring fancy 
prices for bacon, and a yard of Rhode 
Island Reds and Buff Plymouth Rocks 
which supplies eggs in marketable quan- 
tities. 



The chickens, in fact, at present are 
the most interesting feature of the ranch 
to Chatterton. He intends building up 
his poultry runs to large proportions, for 
he has had sufficient experience with 
chicken-raising to see the heavy profits 
which may be obtained by those who 
"know how." 

His dairy, too, is one of the mainstays 
of the ranch. All his stock that he is 
buying are thorobred Ayreshires, and 
nearly every cow has a record as a milk- 
producer. Chatterton is familiar with 
their pedigrees, and almost can call to 
mind the grandfather and grandmother 
of each "critter" he owns. 

But serious business is not all that Tom 
Chatterton finds when he gets a vaca- 
tion from the studio and travels to his 
ranch. Instead, he finds varied sports. 
The river runs near-by, and one of its 
sloughs extends into the ranch. There 
Chatterton finds good fishing, both from 
the shore and in a boat. 

Grouse, quail and pheasant abound in 
the meadows during the season, and 
every spring and fall the wild duck pay 
a visit to the ranch. And in about two 
hundred acres of timbered land still on 
the ranch are several deer, to say nothing 
of other four-footed denizens of the 
forest not under protection of the game 
laws. 



95 






c 
c 

c 

> 

c 

I—. 

c 
w 

H 
H 
< 

u 




A "TIMBER SLASH" THRU A GROVE OF EUCALYPTUS ON THE 500-ACRE RANCH 

OWNED BY THOMAS CHATTERTON, ON THE SACRAMENTO 

RIVER, IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 



It is a very satisfied Chatterton who 
has the ranch, and a very fortunate one. 
Few actors have been so successful in 
establishing- their guarantee • against the 
future, and while Tom has many years 
before him, he feels that he is so de- 
lighted with his ranch that he will be 
ready at any time to give up grease-paint 
to grow alfalfa. 

''With my relative," said Tom, "I have 
managed to build up something to which 



I can look forward. I will stay in the 
pictures, of course, so long as I think 
I am remaining successful, but after that, 
me for the farm." 

Yes, he said "farm," not "ranch." 
Truth to tell, Chatterton is an Eastern 
boy whose birthplace was "upstate" in 
New York. " Perhaps, that accounts for 
his desire to play leads with a company 
of chickens and the gentle milch-cows 
of the East. 



In Picture Land 



By M. F. GIPSON 



land of dear desire and fair fulfilment, 
Whose visions raise mere mortals to 

the sky, 

1 have seen your flower of life that never 

fadeth, 
I have heard your strains of songs that 
never die. 
I have glimps'd your tints of truth that 
duty shadeth, 
And bless the road so rough that led 
one there, 
To land of clear desire and fair fulfilment, 
That lies beyond the portals of despair. 



97 



land of dear desire and fair fulfilment, 
Whose gardens in the picture valley 

lie, 

1 have waited for your light of hope that 

giveth 
An answer to the everlasting Why. 
I have caught the glow of scenes that 
ever liveth, 
O inspirating dreams! O treasure rare! 
My land of dear desire and fair fulfil- 
ment, 
That gleams beyond the portals of 
despair. 




CHARLES CLAREY and MILTON SILLS in Fox's Super- feature, "The Honor System' 



Is He Worth It, and Does He Get It? 




CHARLES CHAPLIN IN HIS LATEST, "THE RINK" ( MUTUAL) 



"QAy, you dont mean to tell me that 
^ you think that fellow Chaplin is 
funny, do you?" 

Despite the fact that Charlie Chaplin 
has one of the largest following^ of any 
living man, you will find any number of 
people who will ask you the above ques- 
tion, and just as many others who will 
tell you confidentially that ''he doesn't get 
all that money.'' 

Well, if you cant laugh when our 
favorite horse-play funster requests the 
second comedian to put the soft pedal 
on the soup-spoon sonata, so that Edna's 
conversation may be heard; when, as a 



99 



fiddler, he tries to compete with a street- 
corner band, fails musically but beats 
them to the collection; when he cavorts 
on a moving staircase while the villain 
still pursues him ; when — but what's the 
use of naming other equally laughable 
maneuvers? — if you cant laugh at the 
ones already mentioned, you're hopeless ! 
Possibly you belong to the dry-humor 
gang who are afraid to laugh from the 
diaphragm because some of their associ- 
ates might accuse them of low-brow-ness. 
If this is the case, you will be sure to 
smile knowingly when some reputed wit 
pulls something that you think may con- 



100 



IS HE WORTH IT, AND DOES HE GET IT? 



tain a degree of subtlety. One must not 
fail to appreciate this subtle stuff. Even 
if one fails to get a point, one must at 
least smile if one thinks a point is lurking 
around waiting to be got. 

Recently I heard of a woman who had 
been discussing a wonderful lecture she 
had attended. When asked what the lec- 
ture was about, she said : "Oh, I couldn't 
tell you what it was about, it was so 
vague — just wonderful and vague!" 
Well, if the world appreciated only the 
"wonderful and vague," Chaplin would 
be drawing about eighteen dollars a 
week as a retail salesman, or a like 
amount as a lathe hand, or at some other 
job for which he wasn't designed. 

But you take it from me — you couldn't 
take it from a person who knows less 
about the inside of the movie game and 
the system of exploiting the so-called stars 
— take it from me, when a comedian can 
line 'em up on the sidewalk and make 'em 
wait for a couple of hours to see him 
throw meringue thru two reels, he's 
there ! 

Now consider some of the other funny 
film men. Many comedians do the same 
things Charlie does ; they affect an eccen- 
tric walk, wear misfit clothes and peculiar 
mustaches ; they fall down, shoot each 
other in the sitting-room, break bottles 
over their rivals' heads, and draw less 
money in a season than Chaplin does in 
a week. How many funny (?) films have 
you seen in which you wonder how it is 
possible for a flock of well-paid fun- 
makers to turn out stuff that is so devoid 
of fun of any kind — films that provoke 
laughter of such a desultory nature that 
you turn in your seat to see who is the 
poor benighted creature thus giving vent 
to his joy ! There is so large a per- 
centage of films of this kind that you 
have probably, on several occasions, con- 
templated drawing your few dollars out 
of the savings-bank, buying a camera, 
and getting rich before the public woke 
up to the bunk you were serving them. 

Of course you saw "The Count," and 
screamed at the scene which immediately 
followed the caption, "Spaghetti." When 
Chaplin's foil let the spaghetti dangle 
from his mouth and drew it in as Charlie 
tried to catch the ends, you probably 
laughed until the tears ran down your 



cheeks. I did. The very same week 
that I saw ''The Count" I witnessed an- 
other comedy in which the same single- 
word caption, "Spaghetti," was followed 
by some of the most asinine efforts at 
fun-making imaginable. The director and 
the actors evidently knew that there was 
fun somewhere concealed in the famous 
Italian by-product, but, being unable to 
extract it, they contented themselves with 
throwing the spaghetti all over the set. 
After viewing the above spectacle, the 
thought struck me that if those dubs were 
paid a living wage for such work, then 
Charlie Chaplin ought to draw down a 
million per annum. 

Why is it that, while so many film 
comedians copy most of Chaplin's ec- 
centricities, none of them seems to try to 
duplicate his smile? When he' smiles — 
coyly and sweetly — he always remembers 
that a smile is not merely confined to the 
lips and that the eyes play a large part 
in a smile. The result is that he registers 
strong and immediately puts the audience 
in good humor. It makes them feel that 
he is "one of them." 

Now, I am not saying that Charlie is 
the only funny man on the screen — not 
by a long shot ; but he comes so much 
nearer scoring one hundred per cent, of 
hits than any other comedian, that I, 
who cant possibly know anything about 
salaries, costs of production and the like, 
would consider him an idiot if he didn't 
demand a king's ransom for his efforts. 

Not considering Chaplin's salary, is 
there anything about his films that cost 
more than the sort of films that never 
drew a single dime into a box-office? I 
suppose Miss Purviance is paid better 
than many of the less fortunate young 
comediennes who have never shone by 
Chaplin's reflected glory, and it wouldn't 
be economical to have a poorly paid 
camera-man "shooting" such a high- 
priced star; but these items surely must 
be inconsiderable when the thousands and 
thousands of dollars begin to roll into the 
Mutual coffers after each release. I 
dont know anything about scenarios (if 
there is such a thing as a scenario used 
in making one of these comedies), but I 
shouldn't think it would cost much more 
to write two reels of "Chaplin Custard 
Pie" than it does to type off the same 



IS HE WORTH IT, AND DOES HE GET IT? 



101 



amount of business for "Billie Un 

known." Ordinarily, the play is indeed 

the thing, even if the pro 

ducers hate to admit it; 

but, as- far as Charlie 

Chaplin is concerned, why 

bother about 

a plot when 1 

your star m 

can take 1 



)lay is indeec 



of comedies, or "features," for that mat- 
ter. Why, a hundred dollars a day should 
be a low estimate of the average box-office 
increase when Charlie flickers across the 
screen. And not only are the receipts 
swelled in thousands of theaters in large 

cities and 
small towns in 
this country 
and Canada, 
but these 
comedies 
^ are sent 
broad- 
castover 
the face 
ofthe 




conventional 
comedy situa- 
tions and make 
his audience howl 
with glee? 

Therefore, why 
shouldn't Chaplin 
draw "all that money" 
if his films otherwise 
cost but little more to 
produce than ordinary gar- 
den variety ? In filling the house at each 
performance, these pictures will draw at 
least two hundred more dimes — in many 
places quarters — than will tl\e general run 



globe. If John Bunny's face was world- 
known, what can now be said of Chaplin's 
face, his mustache, hair, cane, derby, coat, 
pants, and feet? If he isn't funny, he 
certainly has fooled a bunch of people. 



THE MOVIE MANIAC 

A daily paper published every month. 

Weather — Rain, hail, snow, and thunder- 
storms; otherwise fair. 

Contents copied wrong 1915. 
Copied right 1916. 

OUR MOVIE DICTIONARY AND ENCY- 
CLOPEDIA 

Edited, revised, re-edited, re-revised, and 

compiled 

By Ernest L. Johnson 



CENSORSHIP (pronounced non-sense-or- 
ship, with a heavy accent on the first two 
syllables). Not contrary to general opinion, 
censorship was not derived from the word 
"sense," nor is it, in most cases, related in 
any manner to that word. It is stated by the 
worst authorities that censorship did not exist 
in the time of Adam and Eve. 

It is doubtful whether censorship was dis- 
covered, invented, or just unnaturally grew. 
If discovered, undoubtedly the discoverer has 
been ashamed of himself, ever since. If -in- 
vented, no doubt the inventor died a violent 
death at the end of an extra heavy rope. 

Censor-ship is of the dreadnought class of 
ships, sailing on the Motion Picture sea and 
bombarding perfectly good photoplays with 
telling effect. Time and again this ship has 
wrecked good photoplays, and then let another 
of questionable nature slip thru. 

Of course there are some good forms of 
censorship, but one explorer, who has searched 
for it for years, claims that it is harder to 
locate than the north pole. Bad censorship is 
as frequent as flies in a molasses can, and the 
good variety as scarce as snow at the equator. 



A FEW LINES OF "WORSE" 
The censor lay in his easy chair, 

Dreaming of the hour 
When the next twelve-reel masterpiece 

Should tremble at his power/ 



the latest rag-time song? What size shoes does 
she wear? Can she speak Chinese? Does she 
enjoy reading the dictionary? and about three 
thousand other questions of a like nature. I 
was unable to print your answers here, but have 
typed them all neatly and shipped them by 
freight. Please pay freight charges, which 
amount to $12.71. I have learnt another fact 
concerning this wonderful movie star since I 
sent you your answers, and am sure it will 
interest you greatly. Miss Darling's cat, Eliza, 
weighs exactly seven pounds, nine and one-half 
ounces. 



FOUR FAMOUS MONTHS 
May (Allison) 
June (Daye) or (Caprice) 
August (Edwin) 
September (Morn) 



PRESS AGENT "A LA CARTE" 

The untruthful press agent of the Bangup 
Film Company had been captured by canni- 
bals, who insisted on his remaining for dinner. 
The cannibal king decided to give him one 
chance for his life. 

"I will free you," said the king gravely, 
"upon the condition that you tell the truth, 
and nothing but the truth, from this time on." 

"Impossible !" moaned the press agent, in 
anguish. 

So, without further parley, they ate him. 



REEL COMMENT 
The leading man and woman of the Bamboo 
Company had an awful quarrel two weeks ago. 
The director and the minor actors are trem- 
bling yet. 



Berry Ball Says — For every Motion Pic- 
ture theater that goes into business, one saloon 
goes out. 

There are 5,000,000 young women in this 
country who know that they can act better 
than Mary Pick ford, but, strange to relate, 
most of these 5,000,000 hold down jobs as 
stenographers, clerks, or else work in factories. 

Motion Pictures are made to be seen and 
not heard, but you wouldn't believe it after 
listening a few hours to some ignoramus read 
the subtitles aloud for everybody's benefit at 
vour favorite theater. 



OUR ANSWER FELLOW (AGE, 196) 

Cutey, Bedbug City, Nev. — Question: Do 
some of the actresses have animals for pets? 

Answer: Yes, but there's no chance for you. 

I. M. Curious, Quiz, III. — Yes, you can ask 
us all the questions pertaining to Moving Pic- 
tures that you want to. If we dont know 
the answer to what you ask, we'll tell you 
anyway. 

I. Wantaknow, Rainbow, Mass. — You ask 
the following questions: Has Dolly Darling 
light hair? Has she blue eyes? If so, why 
not? Does she like eggs? Has she named 
her dog Towser? Can she spell conglomera- 
tion backwards? Is she married? What is 
her father's middle name? Can she eat more 
than five pies at one sitting? Does she like 
the west or south wind best? Has she heard 

102 



SCIENCE FACTS ABOUT THE MOVIES 
After eleven years of careful research, Pro- 
fessor Hardhead, the noted scientist, has dis- 
covered that fish do not enjoy Motion Pictures. 

OUR ADVERTISING SECTION 

Rates: 2c. Per Yard 

* Maximum Space Allowed: 2 Inches 



FOR SALE— Fine Motion Picture theater in 
large town. All fixtures, etc., included. This 
theater is favorably situated, and does a 
weekly business of $10,000. Due to having 
a bunion on the right foot, I have decided 
to retire from the theater business, and will 
sell my theater for $400 cash. Address: 
How I. Lie, 2896 Carp Ave., Fishville, Wis. 




Why Marguerite 
Clark Is Going 
to Stay in 
Pictures 



By LILLIAN MAY 



She will remain on the screen in- 
stead of responding to the call 
of the footlights. 

She shares her birthdays with the 
Father of her Country, for she, too, 
was born on the twenty-second day 
of February. And, as she lost her i 
own father and mother at an age J 
while still needful of them, she 
has always felt that our first if 
American Father belonged espe- i 
cially to her. "Tho," she whim- 
sically remarks, ''there is not a 
strong family resemblance, is 
there?" 

If her adopted ancestor could 
see her in her latest play, 
"Miss George Washington," 
he would say, "She is no kin 
of mine," for she is known 
as 'The Girl Who Couldn't 
Tell the Truth." 

He looks sadly reproach- 
ful, and with good reason, for 
the adorably innocent-looking 
lady bears his name in her 
latest play, and she can not tell 
the truth. No doubt he will forgive 
her if she promises to be good, for he, 
no more than common mortals, 
can resist the appeal of 
this tiny slip of human- 
ity who numbers her 
friends bv the millions. 






MISS 

GEORGE 

WASHINGTON 

TELLING 

HER 

ADOPTED 

ANCESTOR 

THAT 

SHE 

IS 

SORRY, 

BUT 

SHE 

CAN 

NOT 

TELL 

THE 

TRUTH 




Why She Is Going to Stay in Pictures 

Little " WildflowerV Life Story and Her Latest Decision 
By LILLIAN MONTANYE 



In Cincinnati, not so very long ago, 
lived a tiny girl. She was not born 
in a theatrical atmosphere, and none 
of her family had been on the stage. She 




MARGUERITE CLARK ARRIVING AT THE 
STUDIO 

lived and grew up as hundreds of chil- 
dren in the great Middle West live and 
grow. But, nevertheless, at a preciously 



early age she developed a talent for 
amateur theatricals, and, what is more, 
she insisted on having her voice culti- 
vated and especially demanded dancing- 
lessons. The little lady had a will of 
her own, and even then "had a way with 
her," so she invariably got what she 
wanted. 

Bereft of her parents at an early age, 
it was found that the family fortunes 
were at low ebb. There came about a 
family council, with each of them "all 
at sea." But in the end a prudent sister 
suggested that they must not use their 
little fortune, but try to add to it. 

Margy Clark was just a slip of a 
brown-eyed, brown-haired girl, but she 
was as "grown up" in size at least as 
she would ever be. She had enjoyed 
unusual success on the amateur stage ; 
she had learnt to sing and dance; natu- 
rally, the stage suggested itself. Why 
not employ the knowledge in a business 
manner ? 

So there came the flustered profes- 
sional debut of the tiny star (an awfully 
big hour to her then) who has since 
sung, danced and smiled her way into 
the hearts of playgoers wherever the 
footlights glow. Unlike most young 
actresses, she did not adopt the stage as 
a profession because she was "stage- 
struck" or because she was especially 
fond of it. According to her own words, 
she would much rather have lived in the 
country with chickens and lots of pets. 
But her business sense told her to do 
what she knew how to do; for it meant 
her livelihood. 

Her first engagement was in Baltimore 
under the management of Milton Aborn. 
She was successful, but wanted a chance 
to display her dancing ability, so, with 
her characteristic energy and uncontrol- 
able spirit, she was soon in musical 
comedy, where she scored a huge success 
with De Wolf Hopper in several musical 
productions. But the same driving en- 
ergy awoke in the little actress the reali- 
zation that she could get more out of 



104 



WHY SHE IS GOING TO STAY IN PICTURES 105 

her stage experience than singing and "Prunella," and her daintiness, beauty 

dancing, so she developed her wonderful and very patent charm in this delightful 

versatility still farther by going into play will not soon be forgotten, 

farce, comedv and drama. It was at this time she attracted the 




THIS IS MARGUERITE CLARK'S FAVORITE PHOTOGRAPH OF HERSELF 

The last thing Miss Clark did on the attention and interest of a Motion Pic- 
stage before becoming a screen star was ture producer, and after considerable en- 



106 



WHY SHE IS GOING TO STAY IN PICTURES 



ergy had been expended in the way of 
persuasion he placed in her hands the 
script of "Wildflower." Miss Clark was 
captivated by the role and admirably 
exemplified in her own personality the 
delightful tale of sweet innocence and 
eternal youth. And in this, her first film 
characterization, she shouldered herself 
onto the screen as one of its "big per- 
sonages." 

Since that time she has had plenty of 
chance to sustain her reputation for ver- 
satility. In "The Prince and the Pauper" 
she played a double role, and, with the , 
understanding of a real artist, laid bare 
the very spirit of that wonderful com- 
bination of comedy and pathos in the 
play. 

Her skillful work in ' "Molly Make 
Believe," with her mischievous gravity 
and sometimes wistful air; in 'The 
Goose Girl," and various other roles, 



serves to show that Miss Clark's success 
is not due alone to her charming per- 
sonality, but to hard work in every 
branch of the profession. 

Her recent film, "Little Lady Eileen," 
is one that commends itself to everybody, 
young and old, and seems especially 
fitted to the magnetic little star. 

About the time this picture was. com- 
pleted it was rumored that Miss Clark 
had accepted the inducements of theat- 
rical managers, and was to desert the 
Motion Picture screen for her first love, 
the stage. Nearly every newspaper in 
the country printed the story, and it 
brought sorrow to the hearts of hun- 
dreds and thousands who had learnt to 
know and love the dainty little lady of 
the screen. But for once the papers were 
wrong. No doubt she had her hour 
of indecision, but she is not going to 
(Continued on page 162) 




FROM UNA MAXWELL, ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE GLOBE 

^ ,,& u J"f*~£. °^ J<rec/ do/ Sua.c/,2? atru* /cu^tru.^ 7forfi**. Tick** 




SUZETTE BOOTH 



Breaking Into the Movies in California 

A Diary 

By SUZETTE BOOTH 

(This series began in the January number, and this is the second instalment) 

Note: To the many girl readers all over the United States whose one ambition in 
life is California and the movies, I dedicate this diary. It is not the great stars that can 
give advice. When they broke in, it was very easy; but the girl of today, that comes 
here alone and unaided and tries to get in, is the one that can relate the hard, cold facts. 



December 15, 1915 (continued). — 
That's the place for you — not Keystone. 
Why, Mabel would be jealous the first day 
you came on the lot, and you know Mabel 
is the whole Keystone." Fox, Norbigs 
and Keystone are all in the same block on 
Allesandro Street, Edendale. The old 
Selig studio has been rented to the Fox 
Company. Going over to the studio, Mr. 
Rogers, in charge, is very pleasant, and 
laughs loudly when I ask, very timidly, 
"Could you use me?" Says, "Sure I 
could, when we get started. Can you 
play leads ?" Leads ! my heart stopped, 
but I quickly regained my composure and 



said, "I can play anything." "How is 
your wardrobe, Miss Booth ?" I had 
visions of my one little, pink evening- 
gown and the clothes on my back, but 
believe it's better to lie than cry. so I 
said, "Wonderful." He takes my name 
and address, and I go back to Keystone. 
Mr. Palmer is there, and introduces me to 
Mr. Del Ruth (Mr. Sennett's assistant). 
Air. Del Ruth looks me over from head to 
toe, turns me around, has me twist my 
eyes and head at all angles — like he was 
buying a horse (even asked to see my 
teeth) — takes my name and address, and 
savs, "I will send for you when I need 



107 



108 



BREAKING INTO THE MOVIES IN CALIFORNIA 



you." Well, I am tired out, but not dis- 
couraged. Why should I be? I have 
the "promise" of two swell jobs. 

December 16, 1915. — Guess I will go 
out to Ince's. At Inceville I'll see all 
those directors and take the best position 
offered. Take car for Santa Monica. 
Arriving, am told must use stage to 
studio. The stage was an old-time Ford, 
one that was made when the world called 
*he inventor "Crazy Ford." My stage- 
drivers were two giddy boys, and I was 
their only passenger. We went thru the 
Topango Canyon to the ocean, passed 
the quaint Japanese fisherman village, 
and then — Ince's. Ince's is a city in it- 
self, overlooking the Pacific. Climbing 
a steep hill, I find myself amid ruins — 
evidently had a fire, as everything is in 
ashes, not a soul in sight. " Rather disap- 
pointed, I leave. Descending the hill, 
I find the Ford stage has vanished. 
"My! what will I do? How will I get 
back ? Why, oh, why, do they build these 
studios off the earth? Is it to keep the 
movie aspirants away ?" My wrist- 
watch says five o'clock. I am so fright- 
ened and cold; it is getting so dark. I 
wait for at least an hour and pray; my 
prayers are answered; here comes an 
auto-truck. I ask the driver if he will 
take me to Santa Monica. He was very 
fresh, and replied, "For a kiss I will." 
Horrors ! I offer him a quarter, but he 
starts to go off. Look out on that vast, 
cold ocean; the great mountains; the 
chattering sea-gulls — could anything be 
more terrible than to stay out here all 
night (not even to kiss a strange man) ? 
So I said, "Well, only one, when we get 
to Santa Monica." We ride in silence. 
Within a few blocks of it I jump off the 
seat, striking the ground with a thud. I 
was stunned for a minute, but jumped 
up, and oh ! how I did run for the cars ! 
Arrived in Los Angeles, in great pain ; 
went to my hotel. Well, I have spent 
seventy cents car-fare and had this 
dreadful experience ; still, I believe if 
Mr. Ince had seen me he would have 
given me a position. 

December 17, 1915. — Sunday. Am 
laid up with a sprained ankle; told the 
doctor my experience, and he said, "You 
will find that everything you get in Cali- 
forn'a you pay dearly for." Says it's no 



place for me "alone" — the movies are so 
immoral; that hundreds of young girls 
are lured out here every year, thinking 
they can be stars, fail, go broke, suicide 
or worse is their end. But not in my case 
— I have a wonderful face (so they all 
say). I hate advice; it's worth just what 
it costs me — nothing. 

December 18, 1915. — Stopping at the 
same hotel as I do is a well-known movie 
star. He advises me to write to each of 
the studio directors. He gives me the 
addresses and dictates the letter. I write 
to four of them— D. W. Griffith (Alexan- 
dria Hotel), Cecil B. DeMille (Lasky's), 
Oliver Morosco (Morosco's), Roland 
Sturgeon (Vitagraph) — give them my 
description, and ask for an interview. I 
know they will never answer. 

December^ 19, 1915. — Getting lone- 
some and tired of "window shopping." 
Nothing doing in the movies at this time 
of year. Have decided to try something 
else until after the holidays. Answer an 
ad. at the "Unique" for saleslady; im- 
press the manager by saying, "It's not 
experience but personality that makes a 
good saleswoman," so am immediately 
put to work at fifteen dollars per week, 
selling blouses. Oh, dear, I'm getting 
so tired; it's not three-thirty, and such a 
day — blunders, blunders. I did not know 
how to ring in or out, made my checks 
out wrong, and was "called"; and those 
waists — the head lady said there were 
only five gross ; to me there were five 
million. Several of the big movie stars 
came in, and they looked so prosperous. 
I am very disgusted with my lot. 
Wealthy lady comes in shop and takes 
a great fancy to me ; says I look like her 
deceased daughter; asks all about me. 

December 20, 1915.— Well, I have 
spent a dreadful night ; dreamt I was be- 
ing tortured by millions of little demons, 
each wearing a shirtwaist, and how they 
did poke at me! Arriving at the shop, 
they put me to dressing windows. My 
friend called with her husband, and in- 
vited me to spend the holidays with them. 
Oh, I'm so glad. It's dreadful to be a 
saleslady when your ambition is to be a 
movie star, so get five dollars for my two 
days' work. My friend calls for me in 
her big car, and I go to live at the 
Bryson, a most exclusive apartment. 



BREAKING INTO THE MOVIES IN CALIFORNIA 



109 



December 21, 1915. — Having a lovely 
time with my new friends — motoring, et 
cetera — and so, little diary, I shall lay 
you away until after the New Year, when 
I shall again renew my efforts to become 
a great star of. the movies. 

January 17, 1916.— Monday. Back 
to a hotel again, after three weeks' holi- 
days. Each of the director-generals 
I wrote have answered. D. W 
Griffith says they are discharg- 
ing, instead of engaging,- at his i 
studio — have been obliged 
to let some of their best 
people go ; times are 
hard in the movies 
at present. Ro- 
land Sturgeon, of 
Vitagraph, said 
that he would 
have a talk 
with me after 



February first. Cecil B. DeMille, of 
Lasky's, responds, saying he would grant 
me an interview any evening after six 
p. M. 

January 18, 1916. — Oliver Morosco 
(Morosco's) answered this morning; 
says for me to call at 
the studio (Temple 
and Bronson 
streets) and 
ask for Mrs. 
Francis Ford. 
After breakfast 
— d r e s s e d in 
my best — start 
out, take Tem- 
ple Street car, 
and ride to 
end of 




SUZETTE BOOTH 



110 



BREAKING INTO THE MOVIES IN CALIFORNIA 



rest of the studios, it is in a remote spot 
of Los Angeles ; walk down a hot, dusty 
country road to studio, asking for Mrs. 
Ford. A tall, slim lady invites me into 
her office — is so sorry, but they have just 
started a picture ; had I come sooner she 
would have cast me in it (oh, dear, I am 
always just a little late) ; asks the same 
questions — age, weight, height, et cetera 
— scribbles O. K. very prettily across my 
application, and promises to cast me in 
the next production. 

January 19, 1916. — Have decided to 
call on Cecil B. DeMille, at Lasky's, so 
at five o'clock start for Hollywood. It 
is a long ride. As I look out the car 
window at the rose-bedecked homes, 
flowers blooming in profusion every- 
where, orange-groves loaded down with 
golden fruit (and it is January) — Cali- 
fornia is a paradise. At the studio, for 
a block long, people of all types and ages 
stood in line — more middle-aged men and 
women than youths and maids. Some of 
the elderly men looked prosperous ; they 
had seen better days ; now were eager to 
earn three dollars. I pushed thru the 
crowd and entered office, an unplastered 
frame shack. In the center are two 
windows, like a theater ticket-office — 
over the first, "Engagements, 5 to 6 — 
Capt. Ford" ; the other, "Cecil B. De- 
Mille can be seen by appointment only." 
I handed my letter in at the latter win- 
dow to Mr. DeMille's secretary. She 
said he was on the lot somewhere, but 
would see me shortly. I stood and 
waited. A stylishly dressed couple came 
in. I glanced at the card he handed in; 
they were stars of the legitimate stage, 
whom I had seen many times. We 
waited, and waited, and waited. It was 
dark and nearly seven o'clock. The 
couple grew tired and left ; the telephone 
operator said she guessed Mr. DeMille 
forgot and went home — for me to come 
out tomorrow. 

January 20, 1916. — Did not have the 
courage to take that long ride to Holly- 
wood again today. Going into a cafe- 
teria for dinner, this evening, a beautiful 
girl accosted me and said she was 
hungry. I invited her to dine with me. 
She told me her story — ran away from 
home (Lansing, Kansas) to Los Angeles 
to be a movie star. "I have trudged and 



trudged the studios," she said, "but with- 
out influence you cannot get a position. 
When I get back home I am going to 
have big dodgers printed and sent broad- 
cast, 'Girls Beware Los Angeles and the 
Movies !' " The hotel was holding her 
trunks until she heard from home ; in the 
meantime she was starving. Well, this 
has dampened my ardor somewhat. 

January 21, 1916. — Another trip to 
Hollywood to see Mr. DeMille. It is 
bitterly cold (unusual for Los Angeles). 
I note "Old Baldy" covered with snow; 
did not affect the crowd, however. The 
streets were thronged with people. Hav- 
ing heard there was a big production to 
go out next week, all were eager to get 
in it. Miss Secretary smiled sweetly 
when I arrived, and said, "Miss Booth, 
Mr. DeMille will see you in a moment. 
My ! how important I felt ! The crowd 
looked and made remarks to each other. 
"A big star," no doubt they said. Finally 
Miss Secretary came to the window and 
said, loudly, "Miss Booth, Mr. DeMille 
will see you now." Well, I felt like an 
old maid leading her last chance to the 
altar to the strains of "Here Comes the 
Bride," et cetera, as the crowd made 
room for me to pass. My demeanor 
changed as I found myself in Mr. De- 
Mille's presence. The room was filled 
with beautiful fugs, odd furniture and 
hunting trophies. At a beautifully carved 
table sat Mr. DeMille. He looks more 
like a "potentate" than a movie director. 
Raising his tired, dark eyes, he said 
(before I could utter a word), "We have 
no positions open at present. See Cap- 
tain Ford; he might assist you a little," 
and went on writing. I felt as tho a 
steam roller had passed over my body — 
I was so completely crushed. Outside 
the studio it was cold and dark, and I 
burst into tears — I was so lonely. That 
melodrama advertised on" billboards, "A 
Little Girl Alone in a Big City" — I am 
the original, I said to myself. Had Mr. 
DeMille only said that in his letter, it 
would have saved me all this trouble. 

January 22, 1916. — Go out to see 
Captain Ford ; they tell me it's a good 
way to get in a studio by working 
"extra." At five o'clock sharp I was in 
line with the crowd, waiting my turn. 
(To be continued in our next number) 




Accident and life insurance mean 
nothing in the life of Thomas 
Meighan, the popular Lasky Com- 
pany star. What Meighan craves above 
everything else is fire insurance, ancLso 
far he has been received as a very poor 
risk. 

Destiny must have intended Tom to be 
a brave fire-laddie, and wear red sus- 
penders and a blue shirt, and things like 
that, and then slipped up and made him 
a splendid actor. 

Burning is his favorite form of amuse- 
ment. It is getting so now that when he 
goes into a Lasky production he never 
uses grease-paint, but, in preference, 
selects some nice fire-proof material. 

To begin at the beginning, Meighan 
was born in Pittsburgh, but this should 
not be held against him, as he had an 
excellent record as a football player and, 
thru his feats on the gridiron, was able 
to reflect a great deal of credit on that 
blackened city. 

Discussing his college career, Meighan 
speaks solely 01 his athletic distinctions, 
failing entirely to mention the fact that 
he may have occasionally studied, and 
there always will be room for argument 
on that subject. 

The Meighan mater and pater had him 
slated to be a physician when he left col 



Thomas Meighan 

Hero of Many Fires 



By WILNA WILDE 




111 



lege, and he was to follow a brilliant career 
in medicine, but young Thomas developed 
into such a broad-shouldered, two-fisted 
individual that he could not see himself 
burning the midnight oil trying to dis- 
cover if the medulla oblongata w r as lo- 
cated near the pancreas or the Wabash 
tracks. 

Then Thomas became stage-struck. 
Henrietta Crosman happened to be in 
Pittsburgh, playing ''Mistress Nell," 
and Thomas sought an engagement with 
her company. He was about the same 
build then that he is now, and when he 
loomed up head and shoulders over the 
quaking company manager and said he 
desired to appear in Miss Crosman's sup- 
port, there was no argument. Strange to 
say, he immediately made a hit, and, from 
being one of the townspeople, villagers, 
peasantry, gentlemen of the court, et 
cetera, he was promoted to a regular part 
and spoke real lines right out loud. 

After the season with Henrietta Cros- 
man he joined Grace George's company, 
and after this engagement, and two years 
of stock in his native town, he had the 
distinction of being heralded as one of 
the leading juveniles of the country. 

He played for some time with Elsie De 
Wolf, then with John Mason, and then 



112 



THOMAS MEIGHAN 



under Willie Collier in "The Dictator." 
All the time he was attracting more and 
more attention, so when the all-star cast 
of "The Two Orphans" was organized 
for a New York engagement, Thomas 
had his name in big type along with the 
rest of the celebrities. 

They then shipped him to London as 
leading man with "The College Widow," 
where he was able to make the English 
people almost grasp the meaning of 
American slang. After the London en- 
gagement he returned to America, and 
appeared for three years with David War- 
field in "The Return of Peter Grimm." 
At the conclusion of this 
he went 



back again to the British Isles, appearing 
in George Cohan's play, "Broadway 
Jones." 

While playing in "The Return of Peter 
Grimm," he was spotted by Cecil B. 
De Mille, director-general of the Lasky 
Company, who had a great deal to do 
with the success of that unusual play. 
C. B. kept him in the back of his mind, 
and, after Meighan had scored a pro- 
nounced success as the lawyer for the 
defense in "On Trial," a tempting offer 
to join the Lasky Company was dangled 
before his face. 

Motion Picture work was new to 
Meighan, but as leading man for Laura 
Hope Crews, in the Lasky production of 
"The Fighting Hope," he scored a great 
success and established himself as a 
screen favorite, and he strengthened this 
popularity as leading man for Charlotte 



Walker in "Kindling" ; then he began to 
receive the nickname of "Conflagration 
Tom." In "Out of Darkness," again 
leading man for Miss ^^^ Walker, 
he was supposed to Jfrv-Bk be bound 
to a chair and the 
building- set 





j 



on fire. Miss Walker was 
supposed to rush" in and aid 
in his rescue. Tom was 
bound to the chair — the 
place set ablaze all accord- 
ing to schedule — and 
every one was delighted 
with the amount of flame, 
the smoke, and everything. 
When Miss Walker dashed 
to remove the 




ropes and rescue him, she found she 
could not untie them. The flames were 
crackling merrily away around the chair, 
and from the roof pretty sparks were 



THOMAS MEIGHAN 



113 



falling on to his head and shoulders. 
Finally Miss Walker was able to release 
him enough, to get. one arm free before 
she collapsed from the smoke. Tom had 
to lift her in his arms and carry her to 
safety, with his clothes burning in many 
places. In some places the burns neg- 
lected to remain on the" clothing and 
pierced certain portions of his anatomy, 
which Tom's medical training informed 
him were known as the cuticle and epi- 
dermis. On account of the healing lini- 
ments, Meighan was for the next few 
weeks more or less abandoned as a social 
favorite. 

By the time all the burns had healed, 
the Lasky Company elected to put on 
"The Trail of the Lonesome Pine" with 
Miss Walker, and Tom was again se- 
lected as the revenue officer. While 
chasing the moonshiners thru the moun- 
tains of Virginia, he was captured, his 
wrists bound behind him with ropes, and 
he was placed in a barn for safe-keeping, 
but, by inducing June to light his pipe, 
he was able to spill sparks in the straw 
and burn his bonds and escape. All this 
was carefully figured out, except the fact 
that quite a little flame is required to 
burn rope, consequently, when the rev- 
enue officer leaped to freedom, he carried 



with him two badly blistered wrists, as 
the scars that are still visible will testify. 

Meighan played a number of prom- 
inent roles, and then along came "The 
Clown," in which Victor Moore was to 
be starred. Meighan scored such a suc- 
cess as the young lover that he was 
promptly featured, and now he has risen 
to the dignity of a star in his own right. 

Around the studio Tom is known as 
"The Big Irishman," and is much beloved 
by every one. 

Several years ago he married Frances 
Ring, the clever dramatic actress sister 
of the musical Blanche. The present 
Mrs. Meighan is in the East, and Tom is 
more or less downhearted, except when 
there is a chance to go to the end of the 
lot, back of the studio, and play baseball 
with the other male Lasky luminaries, 
or motor around the country. - 

Tom owns a machine, but doesn't drive 
it. He formerly drove his own car, but 
one day somebody got in his road, and 
Tom is real Irish enough not to turn 
out, consequently he finds it much cheaper 
to hire a chauffeur. 

Several new productions are planned 
by the Lasky Company in which Mr. 
Thomas Meighan's name will appear as 
the star. 



v^ 



ve 



The Hindu's Surprise 

By OSCAR H. ROESNER 

One day a Hindu, in the garb so strange to western eyes, 

Sat musing in a movie show on deeds of great emprise, 

And tho he drank of wind and sun by the Pacific's "shore, 

He thought he roamed a land afar the rolling wide seas o'er. 

Once more he in Benares stood and Matched the Ganges roll; 

The savor of its incense loved thru all his being stole. 

Again he saw the ghats a-throng with waiting, reverent ones, 

Who strewed the sacred river's tide with blossoms bright as suns. 

Before his eyes blazed fane and dome and mosque with minaret, 

In dazzling, golden splendor shone like crown with jewels set. 

Weird ravens circled round the dead, the city pulsed with heat, 

Above his head muezzin cry in raptured echoes beat. 

And then he thought he heard the bells from countless temples blow, 

And echo light in accents sweet with sacred cattle's low, 

And rose at once his limbs to bathe within the Ganges' stream — 

But lo ! 'twas all'a picture play and not a magic dream. 



E. K. Lincoln, Canine Fancier 



By J. ALLEN BOONE 



To be a popular screen actor and in 
much demand by producers; to 
have your own producing organi- 
zation and a splendidly equipped studio 
in which to make pictures whenever you 
choose to; to own a farm in the pic- 
turesque rolling country of Pennsylvania 
and an estate in the Berkshire Hills ; to 
raise dogs that will win cups and blue 
ribbons for you at the biggest shows ; 
to motor, to hunt, to go in for various 
athletic sports ; to be successful on the 
stock market ; to have a full share of all 
the social qualities ; to be an all-round 
good fellow and enjoy an unbounded 
friendship, all this sounds like one of 
those "castles in Spain" dreams, doesn't 
it ? Nevertheless, it's very much of a 
reality to one man, and his name is 
E. K. Lincoln. 

"Eddie" Lincoln has been much fa- 
vored of the gods. But 
this can be said of him : 
he has never basked 
in the sunshine and 
waited for the gods to 
come to him; he has 
always gone to the 
gods. This has often 
meant taking big 
chances, but taking 
big chances is one 
of Lincoln's chief 
characteristics. Life 
to him is a system 
that requires deep 
study. Whatever he 
does he believes in do- 
ing with every ounce of 
energy, and as he has 
plenty of energy, results 
are bound to break for him, 
not always his way, perhaps, 
buj: nevertheless they break, and 
in the continuous breaking he 
runs a high average in getting 
the things he starts after. 

Lincoln began life with four valu- 
able assets — good looks, a keen mind, 
a bubbling sense of humor; and a splen- 
did physique. These got him thru 
school days, with an alacrity that sur- 
prised even his parents, and then he 



decided to become' an 
actor. His good looks 
and .personality landed 
him a small part in a 
stock company and in 
one of the second-class 
cities of Pennsylvania, 
and three 




114 



weeks afterwards he was the leading 
man. From then on, for the next few 
years, he played leads in stock com- 
panies in different parts of the country. 
Always he kept a close eye on the finan- 
cial barometer, realizing that independ- 
ence in any walk of life exists only when 



E. K. LINCOLN, CANINE FANCIER 



115 




one can afford to be independent. 
Each week a certain part of his 
salary went into a savings bank, and 
each time he changed stock com- 
panies it was because he could better 
, himself financially. He worked hard, 
but, most important of all, he saved 
his money. Once, he took his sav- 
ings, and, with some borrowed capi- 
tal, took a flier in stock as a proprietor- 
producer-leading man. The venture 
was a success, and a tidy sum went 
back to the savings bank at the close 
of the season. He was urged 
to try it again the follow- 
ing season, but, after 
careful consideration, 
he made up his 
mind to let the other 
fellow do it, and 
the other fellow 
landed on the finan- 
cial reefs because of 
an off season. 

The advent of Mo- 
tion Pictures interested 
the young actor-man- 
ager to such an ex- 
tent that he waved 
an adieu to stock 
work and joined 
the Vitagraph 
Company as leading 
man. He was fea- 
tured in a large num- 
ber of screen produc- 
tions, and his clean-cut 
appearance and ability as 
an actor won for him a large 
following. It was Lincoln. 
it will be recalled, .who played 
the lead in "A Million Bid," 
the screen play which sig- 
nalized the opening of 
the Vitagraph Thea- 
ter on Broadway in 
New York. 

Lincoln's interest 
in Motion Pictures 
was a thoro one, 
and he studied film 
production from 
every angle. While 
with the Vitagraph 
he invested quite a lot of 
money in different companies that were 



116 



E. K. LINCOLN, CANINE FANCIER 



working to complete inventions that had 
to do with various phases of picture- 
making, and practically every one^ of 
these organizations was successful. 
After leaving the Vitagraph Lincoln de- 
voted part of his time to playing leading 
roles for various producers, and the rest 
was given to his increasing business 
interests. 

When the Photo Play Production 
Company planned to film ''The Littlest 
Rebel," Lincoln was persuaded to pull 
down the top of his roll-top desk for a 
few weeks and play the leading role, a 
part which afterwards won him added 
laurels as a screen player. Later, Lin- 
coln organized the E. K. Lincoln Players, 
Inc., and built one of the best equipped 
studios in the East at Grantwood, N. J. 
There he produced "The Fighting 
Chance," "The Girl from Alaska," and 
several other big productions in which he 
not only played the leading role, but was 
business manager and chief factotum as 
well; 

But Lincoln's activities were by no 
means confined exclusively to Motion 
Pictures. He found time to superintend 
his farm in Pennsylvania, conducting it 
on modern scientific lines, and making it 
bring him in a good financial return ; he 
bought property at Fairfield, Conn., and 
established the Greenacre Kennels, where 
he bred some of the most successful 
prize-winning dogs that have been shown 
in this country; he added to his property 
holdings a 4,000-acre estate in the ^Berk- 
shire Hills, and by private wires at his 
New York office, his studio and his city 
and country homes he kept in close touch 
with his financial interests in Wall Street. 

With so many business affairs to oc- 
cupy his mind and time, one would have 
thought Lincoln would have let acting 
slide, but he didn't, and, what is more, 
doesn't intend to for* a long time to 
come. Acting to him is a big, serious 
art, and he loves every angle of it. Pro- 
ducers are continually making big offers 
for his services, but Lincoln is in a posi- 
tion where he wiH play only in pictures 
that appeal to him from an artistic point 



t^ \^ 



of view. He doesn't need the work, and 
he doesn't need the money, so he can 
afford to be fastidious and pick and 
choose. Recently he appeared in a num- 
ber of special Lubin productions, fol- 
lowing which he played a special two- 
picture engagement with the World 
Film, being featured in "The Almighty 
Dollar" and "The World Against Him." 

Lincoln is the ideal type of leading 
man. He personifies the well-bred, well- 
groomed, athletic young American, cos- 
mopolitan to his finger-tips and set to 
meet any sort of emergency in any en- 
vironment. Away from the screen Lin- 
coln's personality is even more striking. 
He lacks utterly the actor's ego, due, no 
doubt, to the fact that he is interested 
in so many different things that he hasn't 
the time to spend on self-contemplative 
adulation. 

Lincoln is a human dynamo of activity, 
and to even his intimate friends it is a 
puzzle how he finds time to attend to the 
innumerable things he is interested in. 
Aside from his property and business in- 
terests, he devotes time to motoring, rid- 
ing, golf, tennis, hunting and fishing; he 
is an enthusiastic baseball, football and 
boxing fan, and at all these events, pro- 
vided they are of an important char- 
acter, you will generally find E. K. Lin- 
coln's name among the box-holders. He 
attends practically all of the "first nights" 
in New York theaters, and often goes to 
other cities to see the premiere per- 
formance of what may be a good show. 
At his New York home he has a large 
library, and in between things he man- 
ages to keep abreast of the best there is 
in good literature. He is a member of 
over a dozen New York clubs and sev- 
eral country clubs, and drops in at all of 
them frequently to spend a few social 
hours with his friends. 

As was observed before, "Eddie" Lin- 
coln has been much favored by the gods, 
but, and there is much emphasis on this 
"but," he has never basked in the sun- 
shine and waited for the gods to come 
to him ; he has always taken a chance 
and gone to the gods. 




Marie Doro as Oliver Twist 



(Lasty) 




Charles Dickens as the twentieth century actor (W. S. Vandyke) sees him, and as he will appear on 
the screen in the elaborate adaptation of the immortal classic, ''Oliver Twist." 




Charming little Lasky star watching the ragged little street-urchin of nearly a century ago. She is 
"seeing herself as others see her." 

117 




Little Oliver Twist is born in a workhouse and grows up in an environment of poverty and squalor. The 
fare at the workhouse is very poor, consisting of weak gruel every day and half a roll on Sunday. 

Oliver plucks up courage and asks for more. The supervising board is° called in and Oliver is condemned 
to the cellar. After several days of solitary confinement, he manages to escape by climbing from a window. 



.: !'■:. ..! in I i III 




Oliver starts out on his long walk to London. Cold, hungry and friendless, he is glad of anything in 
the guise of human companionship. So, when he meets the Artful Dodger (Raymond .Hutton) he accepts 
the invitation to go to a tavern for food and warmth, and later goes with the Artful Dodger to London. — 

118 



"Ill 1 1 1! I II II I III! I llll i llll 1 1 Mil Illlll Ill ni.il! I !,|, nl 




The Artful Dodger takes Oliver to Fagin's (Tully Marshall) garret. Fagin is a Jew in league with 
thieves and robbers. Oliver is helpless in his hands and is taught the art of thieving. 

In the meantime, Brownlow (James Neill), a friend of Oliver's dead father, has been commissioned to 
find him. Monks (Carl Stockdale), a half-brother of Oliver's and thoroly unscrupulous, has traced the boy's 
mother to the workhouse (where she had been driven by deceit and treachery). He finds that she died 
there, leaving a child — but the boy had disappeared. 






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J§^S "£•••- 




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Oliver, forced into a pocket-picking expedition with the Artful Dodger, watches the picking of Brownlow's 
pockets and is captured by the police. After taking the boy to the police station Brownlow is attracted 
by the boy's air of refinement and innocence, secures his release and takes him home. 

119 




iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiu 



120 




After Oliver's arrest, the Artful Dodger meets 
Monks, who has traced Oliver to the city and is 
plotting to dispose of the boy, so that he (Monks) 
can get the fortune that should be Oliver's. They 
conspire together — the Artful Dodger hastens to 
Bill Sikes (Hobart Bosworth), Nancy Sikes (Elsie 
Jane Wilson) and Fagin, and tells them of his dis- 
covery. Nancy is told to go at once and find 
Oliver, but at the police station she cannot learn 
of his whereabouts. 



Oliver improves under Brownlow's care, is sent 
to school and is very happy. He is sent on an 
errand, is captured by Sikes, and taken to assist 
in a burglary. Once inside he arouses the inmates 
and Sikes and his men have to flee. Oliver finds 
his way back to Brownlow, who has been wild with 
anxiety. 

Brownlow, haunted by Oliver's resemblance to 
his dead friend, meets Monks and forces him to 
confess that he is Oliver's half-brother and that 
Oliver is the boy of whom he has been in search. 



Monks tells Sikes and Fagin that Brownlow has 
the boy and they plot to kidnap him. Nancy over- 
hears the plotting, is powerless to prevent it, but 
when the deed is done, goes to Brownlow and tells 
him the boy is confined in Fagin's cellar. Brown- 
low surprises the "gang," Monks flees, Fagin and 
the Dodger are arrested. Sikes kills Nancy for 
telling of Oliver's whereabouts, then falls from a 
roof while dodging the police. 



Oliver is restored to Brownlow, learns of his 
father and mother, finds that he is Master George 
Laeford — and after all his troubles comes into his 
own. 



American History in the Movies 

The True Story of Captain John Smith and Pocahontas in Six Reels 

By HARVEY PEAKE 





Reel 1.— Pocahontas sees Captain John ' Reel 2.— She heroically resolves to rescue 
Smith bound for the stake (sirloin). him at all hazards. 





Reel 3. — She tries to get the temptation out Reel 4. — She plans to hide it in the parson's 
of his way. humble abode. 





Reel 5.— The parson will not receive stolen Reel 6.— They consent, and he marrier 
goods. He tells the pair they are creat- them, receiving the sirloin steak as a fee. 

ing a scandal by skylarking about the 
country without a chaperone. He says 
marriage is the only way out of the 
difficulty. 



GREEN R@OM 





JOTTINGS 



The newest screen concern is the Gold- 
wyn Film Corp., composed of Samuel 
Goldfish, formerly of the Lasky 
brand, and Edgar Selwyn, the playwright. 
Mr. Selwyn's famous w T ife, Margaret Mayo, 
will have charge of the scenario depart- 
ment. Mae Marsh is the first star to be 
signed by the new company. 

And here's a whole bunch of news, pre- 
digested, concerning the flittings of various 
players: Charlotte Burton from American 
to Essanay, to work opposite Henry Wal- 
thall; Priscilla Dean from Nestor, to 
play leads opposite Harry Carey; Edith 
Roberts succeeds Priscilla Dean with Nes- 
tor; James Young wanderlusts from the 
Coast to Chicago, to guide the screen desti- 
nies of Max Linder, Essanay's "rough- 
house" comedian. 

Douglas Fairbanks' next appearance will 
be in a sure-fire hit, "The Pet of Para- 
gonia," adapted by Anita Loos from the 
book "Blaze Derringer." 

George M. Cohan, the "Yankee Doodle 
Boy of Broadway," has also launched 
into pictures with a splash. He 
visited Mary Pickford at her Fort 
Lee studio recently for a few les- 
sons in the secret of picture acting 
and was tremendously interested 
in everything. His first screen ef- 
fort will be in his owm play, "Broad- 
way Jones." 

Again Hall Caine is to be "screened" 
and the leading role will be played by his 
son, Derwent Caine. "The Deemster" is 
the next of his books to attain this distinc- 
tion, and Arrow is the purchaser. For 
locations the Isle of Man is to be dupli- 
cated in the United States — possibly Block 
Island will be used as the groundwork of 
the location. 

Earle Foxe has been engaged to play 
leads opposite Norma Talmadge. 

Followers of Vitagraph films will do well 
to keep the following information before 
them during the month of February: Peggy 
Hyland and Antonio Moreno in "Her Right 
to Live"; Edith Storey and Antonio Mo- 
reno, with William Duncan, in "Money 
Magic"; Alice Joyce and Harry Morey in 
"Who Will Cast the Stone?" Lillian 
Walker in "Kitty McKay," from the 
Broadway hit of last season, by Cath- 
erine Chisholm dishing. 

Marguerite Courtot has just signed a 
long-time contract with Arrow, and 
rumor hath it that she is to do a serial. 



T : 





In her last Fox play, "The Vixen," in 
which she returns to her "vamping," Theda 
Bara leads a most reprehensible existence 
— ruins the lives of five people, tells fifty 
lies (and a lot more "fibs") and. all in all, 
leads a thoroly vampirish existence. 

Mrs. Vernon Castle and her supporting 
cast have left for California, where the 
final episodes of "Patria" are to be filmed. 
During her visit there she will be the 
guest of the Griffith-Triangle Company, 
and, in order to make the exotic little 
dancer feel thoroly at home, a special suite 
of apartments has been arranged for her, 
with a bedroom and boudoir copied from 
the dancer's own designs. 

At last it has come! Ethel Barry more 
has, once and for all, abandoned the stage. 
She has just signed a long-time contract 
with Metro that prohibits her stage ap- 
pearance for a number of years. 

Seena Owen, in private life Mrs. George 
Walsh, has retired from the screen, her 

last appearance having been in "Intoler- 
ance." Yes, it's a girl, and Mrs. Walsh 
has retired to devote her entire atten- 
tion to the proper rearing of the 
young woman. 

Last month we announced that Vivian 
Rich had fallen (screenically speak- 
ing) for the lures of William Farnum. 
Well, woman is a fickle thing, and now 

Vivian has deserted poor Bill to support 
her old friend and co-star, Edward Coxen, 
in an eigtit-reel Selig, "Beware of Stran- 
gers." This is only a temporary engagement, 
for Vivian has merely been "loaned" by 
Fox to Selig for this one picture. In her 
support are several old friends of "Flying- 
A" days, Jack Richardson, Al Filson and 
George Field. 

Some more "cut-outs" and "switch-backs": 
Stanley Wheatcrot't, after a brief flyer, re- 
joins Fox; Frank Morgan also to Fox, from 
Vitagraph; Roy Stewart, of Universal, has 
fallen for the charms of Lillian Gish and is 
going to make love to her for some time 
(for the benefit of the camera); Charlotte 
Burton has torn herself from her old friends 
at American for Essanay, and Francelia 
Billington succeeds her as a sort of "inge- 
nue-heavy." 

Mary Pickford treasures a recent gift 
— a set of books, complete in two vol- 
umes, of "Edison: His Life and His 
Inventions." The books were a gift 
from Edison himself and contain 
his personal autograph. 




123 




LITTLE WHISPERINGS, 
FROM HVERY WHERE 



IN ..PI 



Here's real news 
for fans: When Cleo 
Madison, as Judith Trine, was 
married to George Larkin in the 
final episode of "The Trey o' Hearts," 
it all took place in the living-room of 
a suburban inn. Well, Miss Madison 
has gone and done it again, this time 
with a real minister, a real bridegroom, 
and all the lovely, fluffy things that 
accompany an honest-to-goodness wedding. 
The man was Adonerian Peake, a Los An- 
geles automobile dealer, and Miss Madison 
has celebrated by forming a film company 
of her own. 

Earle Metcalfe has been absent from the 
screen for some time, and numbers of in- 
quiries have come in about him. He has 
been hard at work on a fifteen-episode 
serial and a six-reel feature. The former 
is called "The Perils of Our Girl Reporters"; 
the latter, "Ignorance," dealing with the 
vice problem. Both are to be released soon. 

Mme. Olga Petrova has just finished ar- 
rangements whereby she will make one 
record, or more, each month, for the 
Columbia Graphophone Company. The ^ 
records are to be operatic selections f^ 
which will show her voice to advan- 
tage, and recitations composed by 
herself. 

Gecl'l B. DeMille came East for the 
premiere of his biggest production, 
Geraldine Farrar's "Joan of Arc," and 
was immediately signed up to supervise 
and direct George M. Cohan's picture 
efforts, the first of which is "Broadway 
Jones" and which will be released thru 
Artcraf t. 

An interesting occasion in Inceville re- 
cently was the religious services conducted 
by Al. Jennings, the former railroad bandit, 
Mr. Jennings being introduced by his old 
friend, William S. Hart. 

Here's encouragement for the really am- 
bitious extra girl. Evelyn Brent, of Metro, 
has just been elevated to stardom after two 
years' extra work. She has been doing 
small parts, and gradually was entrusted 
with more important ones. Alice Lake, of 
Keystone, playing opposite Roscoe Arbuckle, 
is another girl who has risen to stardom via 
the extra route. 

"Vitagraph" Kate Price, who has been 
playing with Vim, has just transferred her 
affections and her jovial disposition to 
Amber. 

Frank A. Powell Productions Co. announce 

that they have secured the services of Nance 

O'Neil, equally popular on stage and 

V screen, and Marjorie Rambeau, clever 

s^/ little twinkler in Broadway's clev- 

^v'C erest hit, "Cheating Cheaters." 



W 






W 
I 









RDOxN 



Here's a funny 
thing: Lee Moran 
and Eddie Lyons have worked 
together for years. They have been 
one in spirit, and all that sort of 
thing; and here both of them are ill 
at the same time, with the same malady, 
neither able to work. Sort of Siamese | 
twins — mental suggestion — take your 
choice. 

Herbert Brenon is now in Florida, with a 
strong script and a stronger cast. The story 
is "Lucretia Borgia," an adaptation of Vic- 
tor Hugo's "Queen Mother." The featured 
personage will be Florence Reed, with W. E. 
Shay prominent in the supporting cast. 

Virginia Pearson has purchased a hydro- 
aeroplane, and William Fox protests that 
she has no right to go volplaning. Firstly, 
because of the danger to her life, and, sec- 
ondly, the danger to her contract. He 
threatens to bring the case to court by an 
injunction forbidding Miss Pearson's new 
amusement — necessary to her health, as she 
claims. 

More changes, here and there: Harry 
Benham from Universal to Fox; Fran- 
ces Nelson from World to Metro; 
Irving Cummins from Famous Play- 
ers to Fox; William Garwood from 
Universal to Ince-Triangle; Charlotte 
Walker from McClure to Thanhouser; 
Ned Finley from Vitagraph to Metro; 
and Frank Borzage from American to 

Lasky, opposite Mae Murray. 

Dorothy Kelly is a skilful cartoonist, and 
has just accepted an offer to illustrate some 
stories for the Columbia Jester, of Columbia 
University. The first of these cartoons il- 
lustrates a story called "Zip! Goes the 
Fillum!" appearing in the Xmas number. 

Dearth of material for good photoplays? 
Famous Players-Lasky dont think so. 
They announce the purchase of five famous 
stage-plays — "Mrs. Leffingwell's Boots," "Wit- 
ness for the Defense," "Freckles," "The 
Dummy" and "The Painted Woman." 
Pauline Frederick is doing the title role in 
the last-named, which will be released as 
"The Slave Market," while Louise Huff will 
star in "Freckles." 

In spite of all her make-believe accidents, 
which are "cooked up" by imaginative sce- 
nario writers, Helen Holmes encountered a 
real one recently, when the gasoline hand-car 
in which she and some of her fellow-players 
were returning from a location shot into 
a ditch and injured everybody aboard. 
Paul Hurst received the most serious in- 
jury, tearing loose the ligaments of his 
shoulder. Miss Holmes sustained a 
sprained ankle, and the rest of the 

company sustained minor injuries. 



SC^T"~2- 



124 





3TTUE WHISPERING 

FFLOM EVERYWHERE 



The fair, fat and 
forty (?) Marie 
Dressier is about to become 
an heiress by forming a picture 
company of her own with the modest 
capital of $2,000,000. 
Grace Darmond, of "Shielding Shadow" 
fame, and Niles Welch, who recently 
supported Marguerite Clark in "Miss 
George Washington," have joined the 
Technicolor Company and have just ar- 
rived at the Jacksonville, Fla., studio. 

Mary Pickford has no intention of steal- 
ing Viola Dana's thunder, but it has just 
been announced that she will photo-star in 
"A Poor Little Rich Girl," which as a stage- 
play helped to make Miss Dana famous. 

Bessie Love, the dainty Triangle ingenue- 
star, has just been married. Oh, it was 
only for the benefit of the camera and 
Triangle fans! This is the tenth time Bes- 
sie has gone thru the "for better, for 
worse" ceremony, and she solemnly vows 
that, in real life, she'll never, never marry! 
In "A Corner in Colleens," Bessie Bar- 
riscale wears a skirt made of Irish news- 
papers. She says it increased her 
circulation. Charles Ray, in "The 
Honorable Algy," wears a monocle. 
His fellow-players called it a win- 
dow in his eye, but Charlie said 
they gave him a pane. 

Following her work in "Intoler- 
ance," which was strengthened by "The 
Microscope Mystery," and opposite 
Douglas Fairbanks in "The Matrimaniac," 
Constance Talmadge, Norma's little sister, 
is going to be a star in her own right. She 
is now at work on her first starring vehicle. 
Marguerite Courtot and Arthur Albert- 
son are delightful exponents of modern 
society-dancing. It goes without saying that 
they are the envy of the less skillful in 
New York ballrooms. Here is a rare treat! 
They have consented to do a series of spe- 
cial dance poses for the Motion Picture 
Magazine. 

Here are a few more changes: Francelia 
Billington from Universal to American; 
Robert Elliott from the stage to support 
Nance O'Neil in Powell Productions; Rich- 
ard Bennet from American to stage, in 
"Zack'; Alice Hollister from Kalem to 
Trincheria Productions; George Fisher from 
Triangle to Yorke-Metro. 

Juanita Hansen, of Keystone, looked won- 
derfully pretty at the recent Directors' Ball, 
Los Angeles. As near as a mere man can 
describe it, her costume looked like a 
bloomer-affair which matched her 
blonde hair. She danced everything 
danceable and looked very pretty. 



i 



I 



A 

j 



\i 



*!/ 



Slf 



~^, (This is a fashion note!) 




\ 





Max Linder's first 
guests at the Essa- 
nay studio were Lina Cava- 
lieri, called "the world's most 
beautiful operatic singer," and her 
husband, Lucian Muratore, the noted 
French tenor. They spoke muchly of 
la belle Paris. 

When Mary Pickford was at work on 
"Less Than the Dust," a camel was needed 
in a certain scene. Learning of the diffi- 
culty, John Ringling, a circus man, pre- 
sented Little Mary with a fine, upstanding 
specimen of camelhood, whose official title 
is Abdul. His engagement passed off with- 
out a hitch, except for the fact that he ate 
up several costumes belonging to players in 
the cast. 

Margarita Fischer, dressed as a lad, in 
"Miss Jackie of the Navy," acted a number 
of scenes aboard a man-o'-war, and stood on 
a mid-ocean buoy in one scene. But, then, 
Margarita always did make good use of the 
mails! 

When asked for particulars concerning a 

recent accident, Marin Sais, of the Kalem 

Company, particularly requested that no 

mention be made of it. She has had 

so many bumps, falls and bruises and 

has broken limbs so often that she 

is sure that most of it sounds like 

the rankest sort of press-agent work! 

Poor Marin! 

Essanay announces a new series, under 
the general title, "Is Marriage Sacred?" 
If you have any doubt of it, you might 
follow up the episodes, in all of which Mar- 
guerite Clayton, Lillian Drew, Sydney 
Ainsworth and other well-known Essanay 
players will help you solve your marital 
problems. 

And now for a brief "star-gaze" into the 
future: Olga Petrova will soon appear in 
"The Orchid Lady"; Ann Murdock will be 
seen in "Envy," first of McClure's "Seven 
Deadly Sins"; Anita Stewart in "The Girl 
Phillipa"; Lillian Gish in "A House Built 
Upon Sand"; Theda Bara in "The Vixen" 
and Geraldine Farrar in "Joan, the Woman." 

Alice Dovey, a pronounced hit on the 
stage, has deserted her play, "Very Good 
Eddie," to do some pictures for Pathe. 
Miss Dovey was delightful as the star of 
Famous Players' "The Commanding Offi- 
cer," a year or two ago. 

Lew Fields has yielded to the lure of the 
camera and the easy gathering of shekels 
therefrom. He has capitulated to 
World Film, and the most remarkable 
thing about the whole affair is that 
his press-agent didn't send out a re- 
port that he is drawing "the largest 

salary ever paid." 





125 



Here Are All the Winners o 

"Little Mary" Pickf ord Wins First Prize Among the Ladk 




T 



Photo by Moody copyright 

MARY PICKFORD 

•he great Populai ity Contest has come to 

a close, and the most popular players 

in the world have been selected by the 

vast jury of over a million members. This 

jury has rendered the verdict that the ten 

most popular players are : 

1. Mary Pickford 

2. Francis X. Bushman 

3. Marguerite Clark 

4. J. Warren Kerrigan 

5. Pearl White 

6. Theda Bara 

7. Anita Stewart 

8. Henry Walthall 

9. Edward Earle 
10. Wallace Reid 

For months it was a close race between 
Mary Pickford and Marguerite Clark for 
first honors, and between Francis Bushman 
and "Jack" Kerrigan ; but, during the final 
weeks, Miss Pickford and Mr. Bushman 
gradually drew away from their competitors 
and closed with a comfortable margin. 

Among the ten winners we find just five 
males and five females. If they were to be 
126 



the Great Popular Player Contest 

and Francis X. Bushman Wins First Prize Among the Men 




Photo by Hartsook 

FRANCIS BUSHMAN 

paired, we would have five teams as 
follows : 

1. Pickford and Bushman 

2. Clark and Kerrigan 

3. White and Walthall 

4. Bara and Earle 

5. Stewart and Reid 

And where could you find five such 
teams? We confess that we are quite 
pleased with the result. While we would 
like to have seen such names as Lockwood, 
Hart, Cunard and Williams among the ten, 
it would he impossible to spare more than 
one name from the list of ten that are writ- 
ten there, and many will think that not even 
one name can be spared. Anyway, it has 
been a perfectly fair and square contest, 
and we must all admit and concede that the 
ten names selected are the only ones that 
should have been selected. To these ten, 
therefore, we extend our hearty congratu- 
lations. To the several who did not quite 
make the ten, and to twenty or thirty others 
who did not get even within striking dis- 
tance of the ten (for some unknown and 

127 




Phott by Matzeno 
HENRY 
WALTHALL 



128 



POPULAR PLAYER CONTEST 



incomprehensible reason), we present 
our best wishes and the hope that they 
will appreciate the honor of being on the 
roll of honor even if not at the top. 

To Miss Pickford has come the highest 
honor that has yet come to a photoplayer. 
To Mr. Bushman has come the next 
highest. May they continue to grow in 
public esteem and to prosper in their art ! 
As an additional reward, we have prom- 
ised to present Miss Pickford and Mr. 
Bushman each with a handsome painting, 



limned from especially posed portraits of 
themselves, by Leo Sielke, Jr., beauti- 
ful reproductions, which are to adorn 
the covers of our Magazine as soon as 
the same can be prepared and arranged 
for. The eight next high on the list 
will receive a handsomely engraved and 
engrossed certificate, reciting the num- 
ber of votes received, and the ninety 
next high on the list will receive en- 
graved certificates as a memento of the 
occasion. 



POPULAR PLAYER CONTEST 



Mary Pickford . . 462,190 

Francis Bushman 411,800 

Marguerite Clark 410,820 

Warren Kerrigan 358,320 

Pearl White 310,690 

Theda Bara 294,035 

Anita. Stewart 283,460 

Henry Walthall 271,740 

Edward Earle 268,760 

WallaceReid 268,525 

Harold Lockwood 267,905 

William Sherwood 264,665 

William S. Hart., 263,215 

Earle Williams. 251,610 

Grace Cunard 246,190 

Ruth Roland 244,935 

William Farnum 241,580 

Pauline Frederick 151,210 

Beverly Bayne 147,140 

Dustin Farnum '.. 146,560 

Blanche Sweet . 146,465 

Mary Fuller 144,530 

Mary Miles Minter 138.430 

Carlyle Blackwell 136,345 

Crane Wilbur 135,825 

Robert Warwick 134,795 

Marguerite Snow 132,020 

Florence LaBadie 128,820 

Creighton Hale 127,760 

Olga Petrova 125,940 

Nell Craig 125,450 

Norma Talmadge 119,655 

Lillian Gish 113,130 

Francis Ford 107,120 

Charles Chaplin 105,325 

Clara K. Young 102,705 

Cleo Madison 101,245 

Ella Hall 101,090 

Edith Storey 100,475 

Antonio Moreno 100,465 

Bryant Washburn 100,405 

Douglas Fairbanks 99,250 

Marguerite Courtot 97,930 

Alexander Gaden 96,040 

Alice Joyce 91,185 

Geraldine Farrar 89,910 

Harris Gordon 88,940 

Tom Forman 88,350 

Cleo Ridgely 87,955 

Romaine Fielding 87,560 

House Peters 87,140 



Edward Coxen 86,165 

Kathlyn Williams „. 84,765 

Mae Marsh 83,200 

Herbert Rawlinson 81,320 

Henry King 80,965 

Al Ray 80,330 

Edna Mayo 80,110 

May Allison 70,960 

Thomas Meighan 69,110 

Lillian Walker 68,360 

Dorothy Gish 68,325 

Anna Little .*. 67,870 

Naomi Childers 67,420 

Irving Cummings ....,;... 66,860 

Owen Moore 66,250 

Bessie Barriscale 66,030 

Fannie Ward 66,015 

Nellie Anderson 65,785 

Jane Novak 65,525 

Mary Anderson 65,040 

Billie Burke 54,855 

Violet Mersereau ' 54,2p0 

Viola' Dana 51,965 

Ethel Clayton 50,155 

Jean Sothern 48,135 

Ruth Stonehouse 45,925 

Robert Mantell 44,600 

Lottie Pickford 44,225 

King Baggot 41,150 

Hazel Dawn 40,185 

Frank Mayo 38,295 

William Courtleigh 36,600 

Mabel Normand 35,730 

Earle Fox 35,035 

Margarita Fischer 34,835 

Hobart Henley 34,535 

Maurice Costello 34,005 

Charles Ray 33,620 

Dorothy Kelly 33,210 

Harry Northrup 33,100 

Vera Sisson 32,340 

Marie Newton 30,680 

Helen Holmes 30,235 

William Garwood 29,740 

Mae Murray 26,805 

Marie Doro 26,110 

Edwin August 25,730 

Vivian Rich 24,035 

E. K. Lincoln 23,705 

Richard Stanton 22,030 

Louise Glaum 20,920 



Max Under Comes Back! 

By CLEMENT F. CHANDLER 



Max Lixder has come back — back 
from the years ago when we used 
to laugh over his absurd antics on 
the screen ; back from the shadow 
of death on the firing-line. 

Time was when Max was 
the spirit of the show. You 
remember him in "Max 
Toreador," "Max and His 
Mother-in-law," "M a x's 
Double" and, lastly, in 
"Too Much Mustard." 

Then there was silence 
— not the silence of the 
cinema, but the silence 
of nothingness. M a x 
had disappeared. 

Where ? 

No one knew, for a time. 



.same old way ; he pursed his lips and 
"smacked" the beautiful blonde — not 
quite where you expected. 

But there was a difference — a some- 
thing that was not there before 
There was a poise that showed an 
enriched experience, a broader 
vision, a more intimate knowl- 
edge of life, of the things that 
go to make up tragedy and 
comedy. 
"In a minute, monsieur," 
he said in his broken 
English; "I will need 
my interpreter to as- 
sist me. 

"Yes, monsieur ; I 
am here again, sadder 
mvself, but. I believe, 



Then word came from France that M. 
Linder had offered his high-powered car 
and his life to his country. 

This was the last of Max, for word 
came that he had been killed. 

But Max indignantly denied that he 
was either dead or a "dead one." He 
,was wounded, it was true — shot thru the 
,lung. It was while convalescing* in the 
military hospital at Contrexville that 
George K. Spoor, president of Essanay. 
found him and negotiated to bring- him 
to America to give him back to the 
screen. 

Max is back. lie stepped mincingly 
across the floor of the Essanay studio, in 
.Chicago, in his latest Parisian frock coat, 
silk hat and stick. 

It was the same Max, with feet as tiny 
as a lady's — Max, the "dandy," the 
"Super-Knut." 

He rolled his big, flirty eyes in the 



more capable to make others laugh. 

"It has been a terrible experience I 
have been thru. I have seen men suffer: 
I have seen men die ; I have been close 
to death myself. 

"You think, monsieur, that this ex- 
perience would kill all the laughter in 
me? You are wrong. It has made mc 
infinitely sad, but it has also taught me 
to laugh. 

"There is one secret of laughter which 
I have learnt by this experience — the 
propinquity of laughter and tragedy. 

"Soldiers, monsieur, learn to laugh. 
The horror of the battlefield is terrible. 
It is ghastly. To brood on it drives men 
mad. 

"So we learn to laugh — to take thing's 
as a matter of course. If we die, it is 
as it will be: if we live, we are glad. 
We laugh ; we weep over the dead com- 
rade : we rejoice over those who are 



120 



130 



MAX UNDER COMES BACK! 



living. So it is — the laughter and the 
tears are mingled together. 

"Each day is a new life. The man in 
the trenches lives for the day. He 
smokes his pipe or cigaret, or he goes 
without ; he eats 
his rations, or he 
goes without ; he 
does his work; he 
amuses himself as 
best he can; he 
jokes ; he laughs ; 
he fixes bayonets 
and charges the 
cannon's mouth — 
and dies. It is all 
the same ; it is his 
life. 

"Ah, monsieur, 
when you hold the 
hand of a dying 
comrade, you know 
the grim tragedy 
of life. 

"This great sad- 
ness has made me 
wish to bring more 
joy into the world. 
I want to make 
people laugh as 
never before. 

"This experience 
has added a new 
element to my com- 
edy ; has taught me 
to inject a whimsi- 
cal humor into 
tragedy — to bring 
laughter at the 
verge of tears. 

"It is the con- 
trast, monsieur — 
the quick change 
from sadness to 
joy. That is hu- 
mor in the highest 
sense; that is 

laughter. They are max linder 

closely akin — the 

tears and the smiles. I, myself, rely 
more on facial expression to make com- 
edy than on antics, tho I employ all 
means. I prefer the subtle comedy, the 
artistic touch, but it is a mistake to say 
I do not use the slapstick. I do not make 
it the object; I do not force it; but I 




employ it when it comes in naturally. In 
slapstick there must be suddenness of 
action, a quick turn of events, something 
unexpected, to bring laughter. It must 
touch the ridiculous. You may smoke, 
monsieur; I enjoy 
the smell of a cig- 
aret. But myself! 
I can smoke no 
more — the injury 
to my lung, mon- 
sieur. The doctor 
has told me never 
to touch the cigaret 
again. . It. is a hard- 
ship, but it is nec- 
essary. 

"Also, I can eat 
very little. Pah ! 
The physician 
found out all the 
things I liked to 
eat, and then cut 
them off the list. I 
eat mostly soups. 
I do not like them 
— these soups. 

"Yes, I have been 
on the stage. I 
started on the 
stage. But stage 
comedy and screen 
comedy are entire- 
ly different. One 
must think more to 
be successful on 
the screen. On 
the stage, one relies 
on the physical ap- 
pearance, on the 
voice, on the wit 
and repartee of the 
play, as well as on 
personality. On 
the screen, you re- 
ly on your own ac- 
tion, on your own 
ability entirely, to 
express a thought 
or emotion. But it was hard for me to 
get on the stage. My parents were stage- 
folk, but they did not want me to act. 
At twelve I was sent to a school in 
Bordeaux, where I was born, to be 
an artist. I did not like the work." 
(To be continued in the March number) 



This department is for information of general interest, but questions pertaining to matrimony, relation- 
ship, photoplay writing, and technical matters will not be answered. Those who desire answers by mail, or a 
list of the film manufacturers, must enclose a stamped, addressed envelope. Address all inquiries to Answer 
Department," writing only on one side of the paper, and using separate sheets for matters intended for other 
departments of this magazine. When inquiring about plays, give the name of the company, if possible Each 
inquiry must contain the correct name and address of the inquirer at the end of the letter, which will not be 
printed. At the top of the letter write the name you wish to appear. Those desiring immediate replies, or 
information requiring research, should enclose additional stamp or other small fee; otherwise all inquiries 
must await their turn. Read all answers and file them This is the only movie encyclopedia in existence. 



Sonian. — Your letter was indeed interest- 
ing. It is too early yet to record the sizes 
of the big military men in the present war, 
and I cannot say if they are all small 
men like Napoleon, Charlemagne, Hannibal, 
Caesar, Wellington, William of Orange, Earl 
Roberts, Dewey, Nelson, Sheridan, Alexander 
the Great, Joe Wheeler, and Frederick the 
Great. I think it is not true, either, that the 
leading statesmen of the present day are all 
small like Hamilton, Tilden, McKinley, Burr, 
Harrison, Douglas and Seward. Nor are the 
present-day authors small of stature as were 
Shakespeare, Pope, Balzac, Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, Kipling, Keats and Voltaire. Nor 
are our great musicians little men as were 
Wagner, Mozart, Chopin, Beethoven, Rubin- 
stein, Schubert, Liszt, Paderewski, Haydn 
and Weber. Nor are all of our great an- 
swer men little like I am. 

Beidermann. — Douglas Gerrard was Paul 
in "Bet£ina Loved a Soldier." Tom Forman 
in "Public Opinion." Marshall Neilan had 
the lead in "Mice and Men." 

Country Lover. — Marguerite Snow is with 
Ivan. Mary Fuller is not playing now. 
Glad to hear from you any time. 

J. C Adams. — You say that "Two men were 
to have a duel with pistols, and one's name 
was Shot and the other's Not. Now Shot shct 
the first shot, and the shot that Shot shot 
shot not Not, and the shot that Not shot 
shot not Shot, so they had to shoot again. 
This time the shot that Shot shot shot Not, 
so Shot won!" I hope you feel better now, 
after getting that out of your system. 

Peggy R. — Dont believe all the scandal 
you hear. Some people can paint other 



people blacker than coal. There have been 
hundreds of educational films produced, 
such as "The Hemp Industry of Yucatan," 
"Building a Locomotive," "Rice Industry in 
United States," "The Japanese Silk Indus- 
try," "Manufacture of Big Guns for the Na- 
tion's Defense," "Food Inspection," "The 
Shell Comb Industry," "California Alligator 
Industry" and so on. 

Pinky, 17. — I am sorry you have been 
waiting so long for an answer, but just take 
this tip — all things come to the patient 
waiter. You see, I always tip good waiters. 
Gordon Gray and Antonio Moreno were the 
rivals for the fair Peggy Hyland's hand in 
"Rose of the South." 

Queena. — I hope you have fully recovered 
from your illness. Sorry it was necessary 
to undergo an operation. Yes, I agree with 
you that "pain will turn an angel into a 
barbarian," but I rejoice that it was not so 
in your case. 

Lucille Love. — Grace Cunard and Francis 
Bushman have been playing together for 
about three years. I am not particularly in- 
terested in any of the twelve or fifteen 
serials now on the market. Isn't it too bad 
that coal and mercury dont travel in the 
same direction? 

Edna M. — I was so busy advising Presi- 
dent Wilson how to run the government 
next term that I did not get a chance to 
answer your letter. Norma Talmadge is in 
New York. She worked at Stamford, Conn. 

Bessie W. — Really, I dont know where the 
usher boys get their information. William 
Farnum is still with Fox. William Shay is 
with the Brenon Company. 




events of the meek: Charlie chaplin transports one week's salary to his bankers 

131 



132 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Josephine S., Freeport. — So you say 
Clyde Brown is with the Essanay Company. 
It is pretty hard to gain entrance to a 
studio. Visitors interfere with the rehears- 
ing. You refer to William Duncan in "God's 
Country and the Woman." Get in touch 
with our Photoplay Service Bureau. 

Paul Willis. — Sorry, but I haven't his 
address. Lots of us are less afraid of doing 
wrong than cf being laughed at. We are too 
good to be bad, but we would like to be bad 
if we dared. 

Madison Admirer, — Cleo Madison recently 
married. See our coming article, "Then 
They Were Married." Yes, Alma Hilton 
writes once in a while. Get in touch with 
our sales manager. 

Dorothy W. — History is really nothing 
but a collection of epitaphs — a record of the 
great men who have lived and died. L. 
Payton and James O'Neill in "The Goose 
Girl." Sorry— I'm hard of hearing, conven- 
iently. 

Caroline.— So you want to correspond 
with Lcckwood fans. Why not join the cor- 
respondence club? 

Mrs. A. W. A., Canada. — Cleo Madison 
was Tryne and Ray Hanford was Marophat 
in "Trey o' Hearts." Gladys Hulette is only 
sixteen years old, thirteen of which have 



been spent in acting. Mildred Bracken is 
not playing now. Beatrice Van is with 
American. Flora Finch with ThanhOuser. 
Hazel Buckham is not playing now. "Out 
of the Drifts" was taken in Ithaca. 

James M., San Francisco.— Bluebird is a 
branch of Universal. You write to Univer- 
sal, Universal City, Cal. Sorry you have 
had troubles, but remember that "sweet are 
the uses of diversity." 

Harry Carey Admirer. — I have often re- 
gretted my speech, but never my silence. I 
often say and write things which I would 
not say or write were I asleep. I should 
like to see your book very much. Harry 
Carey is still with Universal. 

Ethel W. — "Overruns" is a studio term 
used to express the extra footage on films 
of given length. Retakes are often made on 
account of bad lights, poor development, in- 
effective action, etc., and often run to greater 
length than the trimmed film itself. Mary 
McLaren was the girl in "Shoes." Mary 
Pickford is in New York. 

Mary G. — You say there are only three 
real emotional actresses — Valeska Suratt, 
Theda Bara and Marguerite Clark. Well, 
I'm not going to say anything, but my read- 
ers will. Come on now, all together. Heave 
ho, my lads, heave ho! 




THE WAY A GREEN PHOTOPLAYER FEELS WHEN HE IS BEFORE THE CAMERA FOR THE FIRST TIME 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



133 



J. P. G. — Yes, there have been lots of pic- 
tures of Yellowstone Park, also of Yosemite 
Valley and of the Grand Canyon. 

Mrs. L. E. J. — Richard Travers is with 
Essanay yet. Marc MacDermott is with 
Vitagraph. Let me hear from you again. 

Clio H. A. — No, Charles Ray is not mar- 
ried. And you really did not know that 
John Milton wrote "Paradise Lost"? He 
was a poet of the Puritans. 

Miriam E. K. — Yes, Edward Earle. I 
think that they should stop the unnecessary 
elaboration and prolongation of scenes of 
suffering, brutality, vulgarity, violence and 
crime in the films. 

Florence B. — You have that wrong; Paul- 
ine Frederick played in "The Eternal City." 
The United States coal-fields have an area of 
160,000 square miles, but it is believed that 
there are 310,000 which contain coal. The 
estimated quantity of available coal is 
3,000,000,000,000 tons. 

Dorothy C. T. — The Bushman-Bayne team 
are still playing. Frank Andrews was the 
husband in "The Nightingale." Jack Stand- 
ing is with Triangle. Orin Johnson with Fox. 

Lydia S. — I am sorry for you, my dear 
child, but be patient and you will be happy. 
Perhaps some day I can write to you direct. 
Your sister may come to you in June. Ger- 
aldine Farrar is in California now. Why 



dont you write to Dolores Costello, Bayside, 
L. I.? She would be glad to hear from you. 
The letter takes up too much space here. 

W. Wallace H. — No, I am pretty sure 
Mary Pickford did not campaign in the last 
contest. More than 1,500,000 electric storage 
batteries are used in automobiles in the 
United States. 

Mary C. M. — You say my columns are re- 
freshing and abounding in the sauce that 
spices life with a rare and wholesome flavor. 
Oh, joy! Have forwarded your verses. 
Thanks, again. 

Peggy, 19.— Gladys Hulette was the girl in 
"The Shine Girl." Ethelmary Oakland was 
Baby Kenyon and Wayne Arey was Robert. 
Yes, Sydney Ayres is dead. I dont know 
where Jessalyn Van Trump is now. I sup- 
pose she is married and not playing. The 
same of Pauline Bush. 

Fickle Mary. — That is a myth. Nero was 
not a monster. He did not kill his mother 
nor fiddle over burning Rome. Frank Ben- 
nett in "The Little Catamount." Hazel 
Buckham opposite Thomas Chatterton in 
"The Open Door." Riley Chamberlain in 
"The Stolen Anthurium." Yes, William 
Hart in "Bad Buck" (Triangle). Francelia 
Billington and William Garwood in "Shad- 
ows of the Past." You will get all those 
pictures in time. 



v ut Hi S mo s/ -7///yy 

LBRV£ THE HBS~T TO \ 

/VE — X Ttt/r/h H£'IL 

OO* &£TT£% VY/r//_ 




^j j^ffl | 



A CENSORS NIGHTMARE 



134 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



M. D., Denver. — Sleeping and passenger- 
car scenes are usually taken in the studios. 
The car is a three-sided set, open at the 
camera end, and long rolls of scenery unroll 
rapidly before its windows to give realism. 
In some recent photoplays such as "A Lass 
of the Lumberlands" electric lighting plants 
have been taken along on an extra car and 
scenes were filmed in the Pullmans. Peggy 
Hyland was with Famous Players first. 
Winnifred Allen was May in "Seventeen." 
You failed to enclose the envelope. 




THE WAY IT SEEMS TO WILLIE WHENEVER HE STARTS TO 
GO TO THE MOVIES 



Pauline M. — I shall tell the Editor you 
want a picture of Olga Petrova on the cover. 

Lillian D. — Thank you. You enclose a 
list of players and want to know their re- 
ligion. I am trying hard to keep politics, 
war and religion out of this department. 

Orpha. — Of course you can be one of my 
friends. Warren Kerrigan is not married. 
I must confess that I admire you greatly. 
Confession of our faults is next to innocence. 
Dont shoot — I'll come down! 

L. W. H., Waterbury. — Robert Mantell and 
Genevieve Hamper in "Green-eyed Monster." 
We get very little snow here, and as soon as 
we do get a heavy snow it is cleared right 
away or traffic is tied up. Teddy Sampson is 



with Triangle. Yes, all the plays you men- 
tion are in circulation. 

D. F. B — The Christ in "Intolerance" is 
not cast. Eileen Hume was Ethel and Alec 
B. Francis was Captain Woodland in "The 
Hindoo's Revenge." Grace Eagan was the 
mother and Gladys Eagan was the child in 
"The Empty Crib" (Unicorn). 

Lydia G. — While the players often get 
hurt and expect to when doing daring stunts, 
there is no pain in the wound received in 
the moment of victory. We had a dandy 
chat with Pauline Frederick 
in the January Classic. She 
played in "Sold," "The Eter- 
nal City," "The Moment Be- 
fore" and "Ashes of Embers." 
Ilona H. M. — Thanks for 
the picture. You will hear 
from me later. 

Yponomentea Pusiela.— Am 
not sure that I have all the 
letters in there. I did not 
intend to reproach you, be- 
cause I know that reproaches 
in misfortune are more intol- 
erable than misfortune itself. 
Thanks. Glad of your luck. 
N. B. S — Charlotte Walker 
is with Thanhouser. Flor- 
ence Dagmar in "The Clown." 
That's right — when you gain 
new friends dont forget the 
old ones. 

Lassie, Ocean Cit y. — 
Thanks for your nice long 
letter. G. M. Anderson is in 
New York and is interested in 
the Longacre Theater. Yes, 
send along that tooth. I 
mean the shark's. Bessie San- 
key is not playing now. 

May D., Jamaica. — Why, 

you ought to be glad you are 

living. It is less evil to be 

unable to live than not to 

know how to live. T h e d a 

Bara was born in Cincinnati. 

Dont believe all those reports. 

E. M. S., Fitchburg. — Yes, 

Max Linder is the mirror of 

fashion. In England they 

call him the "Super-knut." 

"Knut" is English slang for 

"Joan of Arc" is now being shown. 

Not Wallace Reid. 

Wallace 



dude. 

Eric Trent in the above. 

Not Earle Foxe, but Crane Wilbur. 

Reid's interview in May, 1915. 

Mary M. D. — Awfully much obliged for 
the delicious grape-fruit. I love 'em. They 
are only lemons that have grown fat and 
prosperous, but what would life be without 
them? The "X" in Bushman's name stands 
for Xavier. Miss Bayne has played opposite 
only Mr. Bushman. 

Edna M. N. — Thanks for the booklet of 
Jacksonville. I'm coming down there some 
time. I noticed in the last election cam- 
paign that the female of the species was 
more effective than the male. 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



135 



Olga, 17. — No, darling, I have never seen 
a white crow. Parrots are known to reach 
the age of 100 years. The oldest parrot on 
record is "Cocky Bennett," a cockatoo which 
lived to the venerable age of 119 years, so 
dont fear old age yourself. 

V/inifred M., Toledo. — Your questions are 
entirely out of order. Film companies are 
sometimes weird advertisers. I have just 
heard from Tampa, Fla., that all the street 
depository-cans have been painted with the 
Paramount trade-mark. But this does 
not mean that Paramount films are junk. 

Miss M. G. — You sent the 
stamp but not the envelope. 
Just think of the high cost of 
envelopes and be more consid- 
erate. I would try them all 
and see which would take me. 
No, you have Ella Hall wrong. 
She is in Los Angeles. You 
failed to sign your name, too. 

Henry H. — Sorry I cant 
hel^ you. If you knew the 
company, I could help you. 
Yes, it was close. Hereafter 
we might let California do all 
the voting and save the ex- 
pense and trouble to the 
other States. Mr. Hughes has 
had one close shave at least, 
hasn't he? It was all because 
Shady Lawn got a place in the 
sun. 

Chalmers Pub. Co., 17 Madi- 
son Ave., New York. — Thanks 
for copy of your new book, 
"Screencraft," by Louis 
Reeves Harrison; price $2. I 
have read it carefully and it 
has my 0. K., for it is one of 
the most scholarly collections 
of essays on photoplay writing 
that I have seen. 

Ernest A., H. — Thanks for 
the kind invitation. I fear 1/ 
cannot accept your kind invi- 
tation to visit your club of 
fifty boys, but I am awfully 
obliged. I am sure I am a 
big loser by not being able to 
get there. 

W. A. H.; Gertrude W.; Jane L.; George 
C; Casey; A Subscriber; Iris; Florence 
A. S.; Rine; Anna M. S.; M. J. W., El 
Paso; Winnie; Betty J.; Texas Cow-girl; 
Mary Ann; Duncan A., Pine Bluff; Cathe- 
rine B.; Little Anna M.; Every Week; 
Elizabeth M.; J. Joscelyn, Montreal; F. 
G. D., Spring Hill; A. C. D.,° Legitimate 
Actress; Harry M.; Samuel S.; Magnolia; 
Estella S.; Irene M.; Olive H., Toronto; 
Eddie; Herman H.; Morgan S.; B. G.; M. P. 
M. A.; Marjorie L., Lynn; Billy; Clinton, 
49; M. & C; D. F. B.; Lucia E. L.; Mrs. 
Laura McL.; Me Much Interested; Little 
Friend; Cyril B.; H. Kenneth H.; Ger- 
trude R.; Gale L.; Chewy; Graham Crack- 
ers; Mrs. S. B., Seattle; Cury O.; Eleanor 
P.; Wallace, D. C; Sweet Tennessee Girl; 



Ida Mae; Jimmy U.; R. B., Montreal; K. K. 
K.; Harold K.; Violet C; Elmond W. B.; 
George Mc; The Spectator; An Admirer. — 
Sorry I cant answer you individually this 
time. Please let me hear from you again. 
Hy S. — You may admire the players, but 
you must not adore. We do not always 
adore those we admire — unless it is our- 
selves. Yes, he is a real Jap. Regarding 
those starving babies in Germany, I noticed 
that the Deutschland carried back a load of 
one thousand tons of gold, silver and rubber 
for them! Pretty toothless teething-rings! 




Silas Corncobb — Land sakes, Mirandy, 
she's coming right at us! 



look out; 



Irving M. — You can reach Warren Kerri- 
gan, Universal City, Cal. Harry Carey has 
returned to Universal. Frankie Mann, Don- 
ald Hall, James Morrison and Louise Vale in 
"The Sex Lure" (Ivan). 

June D. — Kathlyn Williams is with Mo- 
rosco. Robert Vaughn opposite Marguerite 
Clark in "Still Waters." You are one of 
the thousands who ask for photographs. 

Imogene P. — Last chat with Marguerite 
Snow was in October, 1914. Lottie Pickford 
is Mrs. Rupp. You see, Mr. Hughes was 
right when he said that work would be 
scarce if Wilson was elected, for now he's 
out of a job himself. 

A. L. S. — You want me to ask Mr. Brew- 
ster to put a picture of Francis X. Bushman 
in the Gallery. That's easy. 



136 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



SC/AE OF OVR READERS 




This loyal film pan 
doesn't mind the 
colo weather in 
the least. 
You see.sHE is 
always wrapped up 
inthe Motion 
Picture Magazine*. 



Don't mind me, ma'am. I've just 

BOUGHT A COPY OF THE MOTION PICTURE 
MAGAZINE, AND I WANT EVERYBODY TO 
GET THE BENEFIT." 




AS SATISFYING- 
AS A SQUARE MEAL* 



A Pessimist 

IS A MAN WHO CAN' 
ENJOY THIS COPY OF 
THE M.P.MAGAZIN6 
BECAUSE HE'S AFRAID NEXT 
MONTH'S WONT BE AS GOOD. 




What will you 
have today , sir ? 

"LET ME SEE -THIS l< 
FIRST DAY OF THE MONTH, ISN'T IT? 
BRING ME A COPY OF THE MOTION 
PICTURE MAGAZINE. THAT'LL BE ALL? 



Lem Rick. — Billie Quirk was with the Har- 
vard Film Company. Charles Mailes and 
Evelyn Selsbie will also be seen under the 
direction of Lois Weber. 

Mrs. T. B. — Yes, I have good digestion and 
I sometimes inhabit the lobster palaces of 
Broadway. To eat is human, to digest di- 
vine. Augustus Phillips is with Metro. 
Jessie McAllister is still alive. Yes. 

John S. — So you have had your Classics 
bound together. Righto. Of course I want 
to hear from you. It is interesting to know 
what curious nieknames the soldiers in 
Europe have for projectiles. Here are some 
of them: "Woolly Bears" are shells which 
throw out a heavy, yellow smoke; "Coal 
Boxes" give off a thick, black smoke; 
"Whizz-bangs" are shells that are named 
after the sound they make; "Rum Jars" are 
cylindrical shells from the' German trench- 
mortars, they travel so slowly that one has 
plenty of time to see them coming and to 
duck; "Sausages" are funny-looking things 
that turn over and over in the air. You can 
see them coming, but they contain a high 
explosive that blows everything to ribbons. 
. M. D., Denver. — Florence Dagmar was the 
leading lady in "The Clown." Yes, Mary 
Pickford did play in "Iola's Promise." Mar- 
guerite Snow was born in Savannah, Ga., on 
Sept. 9, 1892. She has brown hair, brown 
eyes, and is five feet three inches. 

Nell E. H. — A villain must also have in 



him a little of the milk of human kindness, 
even if it is sour milk. So you dont care 
for Bessie Love. She has lots of admirers 
without counting you. 

Agnes C, Montreal. — Never do a thing by 
halves unless you are opening oysters. 
What's worth doing is worth doing well. 
The world will always be ruled by the Teddy 
Roosevelts and Billy Sundays. All we can 
do is to force the leaders to be moderate. 

Myrtle B. P. — Wilmuth Merkyl was Ste- 
phen in "Blazing Love." The invention of 
the automobile is very recent, but steam- 
propelled carriages were in existence more 
than fifty years ago. 

America M., St. Augustine. — There is a 
limit to everything — even to my patience. 
The National Board of Review recognizes 
that Motion Pictures are a true form of 
drama and hence a legitimate vehicle for 
public controversies. Earle Williams is play- 
ing right along now. 

Humoresque. — I think Pearl Wliite would 
answer you. And you dont care for "Gloria's 
Romance" ? One of my Classic readers states 
that if Blanche Sweet played opposite Will- 
iam Hart they would be the Sweetheart Co. 

Roberta B. N. — If love is a flame that is 
kindled by fire, then an old stick is best 
because 'tis drier. Is it not so?. Or, "nest 
pah?" as the French say. Russell Bassett 
was Sid in "Little Pal." Bert Hadley was 
the half-breed; George Anderson the lover. 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



137 



Russell S. B. — Please dont call me 
"Pretty Baby." I may be in my second child- 
hood, but I resent being told so. Tom For- 
man opposite Mae Murray in "Sweet Kitty 
Bellairs." You refer to Mahlon Hamilton. 

Betty of Melrose. — Glad to see you. Stu- 
art Holmes was the villain in "Life's Shop 
Window." That is his real mustache and 
not a make-believe one. William Tedmarsh 
with American. Edward Jose was the fool. 

Clarence de Great. — If it is true that the 
Great Man will plant German kultur all 
over the earth, then well might we exclaim: 
"O death where is thy sting?" That cast 
was too old. Mildred Manning was Bess in 
"Charity Ball." 

Dorothy W. — Yes, but Britain pays a lot 
of attention to our letters if not to our notes. 
Alan Hale was Jericho, Gretchen Hartman 
was Mrs. Braden, Denman Maley was Buck 
and Ida Fitzhugh was Mrs. Brannigan in 
"Rolling Stones." Blanche Sweet and Earle 
Foxe in "Public Opinion." 

Mae G. — So you liked the Marguerite Clark 
cover. Eric Campbell was Moe in "The 
Count." There are about 3,000 languages in 
the world; 3,001 in New York alone. 

J. Jenson L. — Creighton Hale was Reuben 
in "The Old Homestead" (Famous Players). 
Beverly Bayne was Eugenia in "Penning- 
ton's, Choice." 

RiIta M. — Louise Huff and John Bowers in 
"The Reward of Patience." Alan Forrest 
has come East to accept an offer. His new 
wife, Anna Little, may come with him. 

The Eternal Questioner. — All Biograph 
films were released thru General Film until 
recently, when somebody bought the right to 
reissue some of the old ones. 

Reta M. — You dont ask fresh questions. 
All you asked have been answered. 

Ernestine N. — Thanks for your verse, 
which is so clever that I must find room for 
it. "A maid with a duster once made a 
great bluster a-dusting a bust in the hall; 
and when it was dusted, the bust it was 
busted, and the bust now is dust — that is all." 
Alfred Paget was Enoch and Lillian Gish 
was Annie in "Enoch Arden" (Biograph). 
Thomas Meighan in "The Sowers." 

Bringo. — Ethyle Cooke and Thomas Cur- 
ran in "The Necklace of Pearls." Mary Al- 
den is a native of the sunny South, New 
Orleans being her birthplace. She was edu- 



cated at the Notre Dame College in Montreal. 
She is very fine at painting pictures. 

Lady Flandab. — So you dont want to be 
put in the paragraph with all the initials. 
Well, some fine writers find themselves in 
that paragraph. I wish I could answer you 
all, but I haven't room for all. Marshall 
Neilan, Gertrude Robinson, Henry Walthall, 
Blanche Sweet in "Classmates." Lorella 
Blake and Sidney Mason in "The Absentees." 

Anne. — How's that? It is funny how im- 
patient some people are with over-praise of 
others, how patient with over-praise of them- 
selves, and yet the one does them no harm, 
while the other may be their ruin. 

Frog Bubbles. — The crust of the earth is 
about thirty miles thick and the interior of 
the earth is supposed to be a molten mass. 
Hal Cooley is with Universal. Clara K. 
Young played in "The Common Law." Owen 
Moore is playing opposite Irene Fenwick. 

G. U. Stiff. — Again! Jessie Lewis was 
Tifine in "The Dark Silence." See here, I 
wont have you writing love-letters to me 
like that. You've got lots of time yet. Bry- 
ant was 19 when he wrote "Thanatopsis." 

D. M., Toronto. — I do wish you would 
please put your name at the beginning of the 
letter. I have to wade thru several sheets 
before I can get to it. Yes, we have back 
numbers of our magazine on hand. You say 
you are my friend, yet you want to get me 
married! You are no friend of mine! 

Every Week. — You ought to make it every 
day. Of course I do my own sewing. Do 
you think I hire a dressmaker? I always 
put my whiskers under the sheet when I go 
to bed — they might catch cold if f didn't. 
You suggest having a wig made for my bald 
pate. Nay, say not so, Horatio. 

Violet V. — Edward Earle again. Tsuru 
Aoki was the Jap girl in "Alien Souls." 
Henry Walthall is still with Essanay. I am 
glad you like the brown Gallery. Sure, I am 
always glad to get snaps — even ginger snaps. 

Rose Marie. — No, and if you sent me $5 I 
wouldn't send you a photo of myself. I am 
always glad to hear from you. P. S. — You 
might send me the $5 and I will think it over. 

Baldhead. — Yes, Vivian Rich is with 
American. When in the course of human 
events it becomes necessary for you to ask 
if Flora Finch wears pink underwear, it'3 
time for me to give up the ghost. ^ 




one reason why the movie business did not flourish during the stone age 



138 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Mary, 2. — Jerry White did not play ti lead- 
ing part in "The Only Man." He was only 
one of the also-rans. Charles Ray and Rita 
Stanwood in "The Deserter." Wyndham 
Standing and Anna Lehr in "The Bugle 
Call." Mary Alden was the girl and Spottis- 
woode Aitken in "Innocent Magdalene." 

Every Week. — Dorothy E. Gish was born 
in Dayton, O., March 11, 1898, and Lillian 
Gish was born in Springfield, 0., Oct. 14th. 
So your salary is very near mine. And you 
say you also live in a hallroom. Then, how 
is it you are not an Answer Man? 

Gabriel F. — Of course I am not offended. 
I never get angry. Let the other fellows do 
that. Thanks for yours. 



Fatty. — Why not try each? Norma Tal- 
madge and James Morrison in "Battle Cry 
of Peace." George Melford directed "The 
Winning of Sally Temple." 

Lillian A. — Victor Sutherland opposite 
Theda Bara in "Daredevil Kate." Brains 
aren't intellect, remember, for a goose has 
brains. Yes, I liked Madame Petrova very 
much in "Extravagance," but there were so 
many stories in one. 

Anita Stewart's Idolatress. — Yes, S. Ran- 
kin Drew is the son of Sidney Drew. We 
all hope that Vitagraph will reissue some of 
their old films. Send along the snaps. 
Would like to have them. Anita Stewart 
selected the Indian rug as her prize. 




Brudder Johnson (leading in prayer) : And let us be thankful, breddern and sistern, 
dat alldo eberyt'ing else hab done gone up, de movies am still de same price. 



Ruth E. B. — You will get a picture of 
Billie Burke soon. Her last picture was 
"Gloria's Romance." 

Anna E. S. — Yes, Earle Foxe was the vil- 
lain in "Alien Souls." Of course you must 
always sign your name. Elmer Clifton was 
the eldest brother. Edith Storey appeared 
on the stage as a child before entering films. 
She is known to her friends as "Billie" and 
is a firm disciple of the outdoors. Riding, 
autoing, walking, swimming and tennis are 
her favorite pastimes. Miss Storey was born 
March 18, 1892. 

M. M., Boston. — Of course I want to hear 
from you. William Roselle was David in 
"Gloria's Romance." Yes, some of the pic- 
tures have been published and some have 
not cf the eighty that are given away with a 
year's subscription. Thomas Holding played 
in both "Sold" and "The Moment Before." 



Ethelyn Mae. — Mary MacLaren was the 
girl in "Shoes." So you think I ought to be 
with Lew Kelly's "Hello, New York!" or 
Sam Sidman's "Hot Dog Show." I am not 
familiar with either of them. My enemies 
have never injured me as much as I ex- 
pected them to. Indeed, I am lately feeling 
rather kindly toward many of them; they 
let me alone so steadily. 

Ruth E. L. — Vernon Steele played the dual 
role in "Little Lady Eileen." 

Jim, 14. — Leonie Flugrath recently 
changed her name to Shirley Mason. So 
you like Walthall. You're right, the girl 
who will lie in bed while her mother gets 
breakfast would lie to her sweetheart. 

Mae. — Yes, his wife. You have the wrong 
title. How do you expect me to look up 
things when you give the wrong titles? 
Eddie Polo is still with Universal. 




d 



5fl^ COttDUClOft, JLtT n? \ 
Khovw 



VWEM VIE GET TO CHRPWHL- 




ton TH 



M- TRKE THE PoifiTER. 
ocrtE CHRRilE CHRPLIMYluf 
E AlRP ! 



5 




Why dont the merchants wake up and seize the Chaplin opportunity ? Just the other day 

Charlie received a letter from a suspenders manufacturer asking permission to get out a 

pair of Chaplin suspenders. Fudge ! this is ridiculously inapt — Charlie has no 

use for suspenders ; he's never in a state of " suspended animation.*' 

139 



140 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Bully, 17. — Harry Mortimer was Tom in 
"Her Great Price." 

Every Week. — So you have seen 217 Para- 
mount plays out of 266 and 82 Triangles out 
of 104. Do you live in a picture show or 
are you an operator? "A. M." or "M. A." 
after a name means Bachelor of Arts. 

Lillian C. — You are for Mary Miles Min- 
ter. Yes, Bessie Love and William Hart in 
"Aryan." Vivian Martin was Nell in "The 
Stronger Love." It is pretty hard to get a 
pass for Vitagraph. 

William Fabnum. — They are no relation. 
Yes, that is true. So you like the Farnums. 
I shall look with expectancy. Thanks. 



Billie R. — Napoleon Bonaparte was known 
as "The Little Corporal." Florence Malone 
was the girl in "The Yellow Menace." Too 
many people are coming to see me in my 
cage — the Editor is thinking of putting me 
under lock and key. 

Mrs. E. A. — You ask why not let each the- 
ater exhibit either dramas, or comedies, or 
all burlesques instead of all kinds of pic- 
tures in one night, so that people could make 
a selection and see what they liked. That's 
an idea, and no doubt it would please many. 

Gertrude E. — Lillian Gish is the elder. 
Your letter was very interesting. You didn't 
ask many questions. Ah, ha! 




preserving the president's expression of 1916 



M. B. M.— Well, of all the— I wont say it, 
but never send a photoplay to a player and 
ask him to criticize it for you. People get 
paid to do that. All I can tell you to do is 
to keep right on writing. 

Betty. — Robert Vaughn opposite Margue- 
rite Clark. Why dont you get the Classic? 
Yes, the Rialto is the name of a bridge over 
the Grand Canal in Venice. 

S. O. L. D. — Harold Lockwood is out West. 
Thanks for your good wishes. No, there are 
very few of us as studious as were our fore- 
fathers. Demosthenes studied in a cave by 
lamplight and Lincoln did about the same. 

Pine Knot Lodge. — Your first attempt was 
excellent. Remember that there must al- 
ways be a beginning to everything except 
eternity. Of course I am a man. You must 
get that idea out of your head about my 
being a woman. I would like to meet the 
first man who called me a woman. 



Gabriel T. — Thank you very much indeed 
for the cigar jar. Hope it wont "can" my 
smoking in the office. 

Ruth B. — William Roselle was David and 
David Powell was Dick in "Gloria's Ro- 
mance." Take my advice and get the dead 
injury out of your mind as soon as it is 
deceased, bury it and then ventilate. 

Grace H., New Haven. — Thanks for the 
compliment. I remember you from of old. 
There cant be enough said about the immor- 
tal plays. 

Peters. — House Peters is with Morosco. 
Romeo and Juliet — rather, Francis Bush- 
man and Beverly Bayne paid us a pleasant 
visit today. Francis put his arms around 
me as tho he had found a long-lost brother. 
I was glad to see both of them. 

Florence B. — Hal Cooley is with Univer- 
sal. Lina Cavaliera pictures are taken here. 
Leland Benham. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



"Hello Huckf" 



141 




RECALL that golden day when you first read "Huck Finn"? How your mother 
said, "For goodness' sake, stop laughing aloud over that book. You sound so 
silly." But you couldn't stop laughing. 
To-day when you read "Huckleberry Finn" you will not laugh so much. You will 
chuckle often, but you will also want to weep. The deep humanity of it — the pathos, 
that you never saw, as a boy, will appeal to you now. You were too busy laughing to 
notice the limpid purity of the master's style. 

MARK TWAIN 



When Mark Twain first wrote "Huckleberry- 
Finn" this land was swept with a gale of laughter. 
When he wrote "The Innocents Abroad" even 
Europe laughed at it itself. 

But one day there appeared a new book from 
his pen, so spiritual, so true, so lofty, that those 



who did not know him well were amazed. "Joan 
of Arc" was the work of a poet — a historian — a 
seer. Mark Twain was all of these. His was 
not the light laughter of a moment's fun, but the 
whimsical humor that made the tragedy of life 
more bearable. 



25 VOLUMES 

Novels — Stories — Humor 
Essays — Travels — History 



The Price Goes Up 

This is Mark Twain's own set. This is the set he wanted in the home of each of those who love 
him. Because he asked it, Harpers have worked to make a perfect set at half price. 

Before the war we had a contract price for paper so we could sell this set of Mark Twain at half price. 

Send the Coupon Without Money 



A Real American 

Mark Twain was a steamboat pilot. He was a 
searcher for gold in the far west. He wasa printer. 
He worked bitterly hard. All this without a 
glimmer of the great destiny that lay before him. 

Then, with the opening of the great wide West, 
his genius bloomed. 

His fame spread through the nation. It flew 
to the ends of the earth, until his work was 
translated into strange tongues. From then on, 
the path of fame lay straight to the high places. 
At the height of his fame he lost all his money. 
He was heavily in debt, but though 60 years old, 
he started afresh and paid every cent. It was 
the last heroic touch that drew him close to the 
hearts of his countrymen. 

The world has asked is there an American 
literature? Mark Twain is the answer. He is 
the heart, the spirit of America. From his poor 
and struggling boyhood to his glorious, splendid 
old age, he remained as simple, as democratic 
as the plainest of our forefathers. 

He was, of all Americans, the most American. 
Free in soul, and dreaming of high things — 
brave in the face of trouble— and always ready 
to laugh. That was Mark Twain. 



The last of the edition is in sight. The price of 
paper has gone up. 

There never again will be any more 
Mark Twain at the present price. 
Get the 25 volumes now, while you / HARPER & 
can. / BROTHERS 

Every American has got to / Frank,in Si- 
have a set of Mark Twain in 
his home. Get yours now / 5^4 me 
and save money. / charges prepaid, 

Your children want / MarkTwain's works 
Mark Twain. You / ' n twenty - five vol- 
want him. Send / umes.illustrated, bound 
this coupon today / } n handsome green cloth, 

now — whilp / st amped in gold, gold tops 

v o .? a r » / and deckled edges. If not 

1 k • / satisfactory, I will return them 

f > / at y° nr expanse. Otherwise I 

"• / will send you $1.00 within five 

days and $2. 00 a month for 12 

months, thus getting the benefit of 

V^ / your half-price sale. Motion Picture 

2-17 



Na me . 



HARPER & BROTHERS, NEW YORK 



Address. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



142 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



J. Boone F. — So you want us to print just 
one issue without a picture of Mary Pick- 
ford. 

Jim, 14. — No, they did not jump off the 
cliff. That was only a make-believe. Cen- 
tral Park, N. Y. City, contains 863 acres. 

Gloria M. — Yes, you just write. I am al- 
ways glad to hear from you. You had better 
join our correspondence club. Florence La 
Badi© played in "The Fugitive" and also in 
"The Pillory." Barbara Gilroy was Sibil in 
"The Dark Silence." 

Logan W. Fan. — I'm on. Sure, send it 
along. We had a chat with Douglas Fair- 
banks in July 1916 Magazine. 

If Charlie Chaplin would give 
an Old Hat that looks 
like the Original, 
as a Souvenir in 
memory of Himself 
to everybody that 
hasi 




Van Buren. — Yes, I think Norma Tal- 
madge is a wonder and so is little Sister 
Constance. You will get arrested for speed- 
ing on that typewriter. 

Editor The Publisher and Retailer. — I 
note what you say and I aint afraid of you 
or nobody what looks like you. Here's what 
you said: "The Answer Man in the M. P. M. 
says Adolphus is 'a pretty name, which 
means happiness and help.' The Answer 
Man has about as much taste for prettiness 
as a blind bull. Just for what he said his 
magazine deserves temporary suspension 
with death for repetition." 

Tilly. — You're boiling over, Tilly. You ask 
the age of Theda Pickford and if Mary Bara 
ever had the measles. If not, why not? You 
know something about ' Brooklyn? Well, 
dont give us away. 



Vera Nutti. — Very much so. Harry Hoi- 
lingsworth was Teddy in "The Tarantula." 
So you dont care for Frederick Wallace's 
limericks. I like them. Half a yarn is bet- 
ter than no tale at all, yet one sale doesn't 
make an author. He thinks so, tho! 

Gypsie. — Try it. Louise Huff was the girl. 
Fannie Ward has a daughter. I think Flos- 
sie C. P. is still in. Los Angeles. At least, 
she is if she has not moved and is not dead. 
Yes, come right along. Without good hearts 
there cannot be good homes. 

G. U. Stiff. — You want a chat with Violet 
Mersereau, and you think that Pauline Fred- 
erick is the star vampire. Have your way. 
Dawn. — The Crusades were the 
wars carried on from 1095 to 1270 by 
the Christian nations of Europe to 
gain possession of the Holy Land 
from the Saracens. Hazel Dawn is 
now playing in "The Century Girl," 
New York. 

Amelia H. — I dont remember. Al- 
fred Vosburgh was the lead. Never 
use the word "gent." It isn't good 
form. Yes, Page Peters was drowned. 
S. Rankin Drew is with Metro. You 
want Vitagraph to produce Robert 
Hichens' "The Call of the Blood." 

Honor Bright. — Sorry, but I have 
no card. 

Albert D. — Wallace Reid is with 
Lasky. Look it up. Mount Vernon 
was the home of George Washington 
in Virginia. 

Lowry A. — Vitagraph will reissue 
"My Official Wife" with Clara K. 
Young. James Morrison is with Ivan. 
Dorothy Bernard is playing for 
Sherill Feature Company. 

W. S. J., Texas. — You send me a 
list of about fifty names and ask me 
to give you their addresses. Too 
much! 

T. A. TV— So you think that Henry 
Walthall doesn't receive the proper 
attention with Essanay and you dont 
think his plays are well selected. 

Henry A. F. — So you are lonesome 

and you want to correspond with 

boys. All right. I shall keep your 

address and give it to any one who writes 

for it. N. B. — Be sure to specify sex. 

Melva. — I guess that Edwin August's pub- 
licity plan has dropped thru. He got a lot 
of attention. Really, your letters are like 
essays. You always pick out some interest- 
ing subject, tho, and you talk well. 

Gttssie J. — Romona Langley was with Nes- 
tor last. Charles Ray is out West. Theda 
Bara is playing in the New York studio. 
Sheldon Lewis with Powell Company. Paul 
Gordon is with Metro. So you are getting 
along nicely with Carlyle. Thanks. 

Gloria M. — I am sorry, but Lonely Cowboy 
has not sent in his address as yet. 

Marion B., Yonkers. — Warda Howard and 
Duncan McRae in "That Sort." Dorothy 
Gish and Charles West in "The Fair Rebel." 
Fay Wallace is not playing. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



143 



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144 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



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FOR SALE 

A FARM 

at Spring Valley, Rockland County, N. Y., 

consisting of 147 acres, including house, barn and 
other buildings, 2 apple orchards, 12 acres of wood- 
land, with stream running through property. 

Spring Valley is 32 miles from New York City, 
7 miles west of Nyack and 7 miles east of Suffern, 
and is reached by the N. J. & N. Y. R. R. and 
a branch of the Erie R. R., affording 35 trains 
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all other localities as a place of residence. 

Terms on request. Address : 



GEORGE F. 

61-67 Navy Street, 



HERRINGTON, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




►0»0»0»0§* 
3«O»0«0»0* 



"Is this the scenario department of the Flicker Film Company?' 

"Yes, sir; it is." 

"Do you think that there is an opening here for me?" 

"I'm pretty sure there is — right behind you." 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



145 



Isabel G., Tulsa.— Well, I like that! So 
funny! Their child. John Whittier is 
known as the Quaker poet. 

Mrs. K. K. K., Houston. — Most of the 
players are much smaller and shorter in 
real life than they appear on the screen. 
Beverly Bayne was surprisingly small, to 
my eyes, ditto Florence Turner and Mabel 
Normand. Yes; Edith Storey has been in 
pictures as long as any one. She was one 
of the first stars. 

Marion J. C. — Of course I will like you. 
You are starting out right, too. You have 
the names mixed. Karl Schiller is one of 
our writers, and Carl von Schiller is a 
player formerly with Lubin. Just write to 
any of the secretaries — there are three clubs, 
so take your choice. Wheeler Oakman has 
not been chatted yet. So you would iike to 
see Wallace Reid as Romeo. Yes; I admire 
your green paper. 

Togo. — You here! Paul Willis was Billy 
in "The Fall of a Nation." 

J. L. T., Detroit. — Cheer up, Jerry! As 
the artist and the poet love the storm, so 
must we learn to love the clouds of life, be- 
cause they help to make the coming sun- 
shine brighter. Frederick Warde and Louise 
Bates in "Silas Marner" (Thanhouser). 

Lillian M. — I'm afraid there isn't much 
chance. The fields are too crowded these 
days. No, the Congressional Library, at 
Washington, D. C, is the largest in the 
United States. 

H. P. G. — Sorry, but I cant give you any 
information as to how to open a Motion 
Picture theater. 

Nora D. V. — Tsuru Aoki was opposite 
Sessue Hayakawa in "Alien Souls." Very 
good, Eddie; tell me some more. 

Sweet Sixteen. — No; I dont draw (except 
crowds). Your Creighton Hale sketch was 
fine. Columbia is the poetical name of the 
United States. Ruth Stonehouse is playing 
in "Kinkaid, Gambler." 

Alice F. P. — Molly Dean is not cast in 
"Light of Happiness." Marguerite Snow is 
with Ivan. William Russell is still with 
American. 

Insect I. — It is a matter of discretion and 
good judgment whether you move up a 
couple of seats or whether you let the people 
pass to the next seat, and it depends on 
circumstances. Yes, the Gish girls are still 
with Fine Arts. What next? You ask what 
was the first question ever asked me. I 
dont know, but the first answer was, "Your 
questions are not of general interest and, 
therefore, cannot be answered here," and 
was published in the August 1911 issue. 

Us Girls. — I dont know whom you refer to. 
Please send a better description. So you 
decided that you like Motion Pictures better 
than vaudeville. 

Olga M. P. — Do you know that we had to 
pay six cents due on your letter? I am 
afraid they couldn't help you much. It isn't 
worth your while coming to America. 



£> h0USe £uv problems 
the same daayf £ 

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When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



146 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Togo. — No, I am not very religious, yet I 
am very angelic. I believe that education is 
the best religion, and the best religion is but 
education. You refer to Leo Maloney. Yes, 
the janitor has some job emptying my waste- 
basket. So you would like to be my secre- 
tary? Sure you can always be my friend. 

Chaplin Fan. — Mary Martin was Irene in 
"Daredevil Kate." Surely, write in pencil. 
You want Charlie Chaplin on the cover. 

M. D., Denver. — Helen Dunbar was the 
mother in "The Hearts of Men." Lillian 
Drew was Evelyn in "The Secret of the 
Night" Alfred Vosburgh was opposite 
Vivian Martin in "Her Father's Son." 




IN THE SMALL BOYS' VERNACULAR 

Eleanor Seastruck. — The President's sal- 
ary is $72,000 a year. I dont play football. 
Address the players in care of the studios. 
Of course I am an old man. Always glad to 
hear from you. 

Dreamer O. — Thanks so much for the sus- 
penders. A perfect fit. It was very kind of 
you to send them to me. By the way, do you 
know why President Wilson wears red, white 
and blue suspenders? Well, I'll tell you — to 
hold up his trousers. 

Jean, 23. — Since this is your first, I wel- 
come you. Betty Gray was with Keystone 
last. Do come again. We'll have tea next 
time. 

Green Gables. — I dont know what that "S" 
stands for. You refer to Miriam Cooper in 
"Birth of a Nation." 

Frederick the Second. — Marguerite Clark 



is not dead. Horrible thought! Sure, send 
some more. Dont forget that hell is paved 
with big pretensions. 

Sunny Italy. — Glad to hear from you. 
Splendid letter. Haven't seen Billie Burke's 
baby. See Pearl White cover on the Janu- 
ary Classic. 

Movyite. — Leo Pierson was Jack in "At 
Piney Ridge." Edwin August was Adolph 
in "The Yellow Passport." Robert Elliott 
was the young minister. 

Beatrice de Bardi. — Thanks for the verse. 
Will see that your letter is answered: 

If patience is really a virtue, 

I've stored enough up for a year; 
It's now five long months since I wrote you; 

'Twas summer — now winter is here! 
I read all the rules and fulfilled them; 

I even wrote limericks, too; 
But the joy of having one printed 

Isn't in it with hearing from you. 
Now, will you get busy and write me? 

Of course I'm a dutiful wife; 
But stop writing letters!— 'twould kill me! 

I'll write to the end of my life. 
I've thought of a fine resolution 

To make for the coming New Year, 
Not to write one thing in the springtime 

That in winter looks foolish and queer. 

Hattie N. — See below for "The Twenty 
Greatest in Filmdom" by the late Robert 
Grau. Viola Barry was Maude in "The Sea 
Wolf." Lucy Payton and Alan Forrest in 
"The Eternal Strife." Mahlon Hamilton in 
"Three Weeks": First Twenty Greatest in 
Filmdom — 1, Thomas A. Edison; 2, Billie 
Burke; 3, Mary Pickford; 4, Anita Stewart; 
5, George Beban; 6, Geraldine Farrar; 7, 
David Wark Griffith; 8, William Bitzer; 9, 
Thomas H. Ince; 10, Douglas Fairbanks; 11, 
Cecil DeMille; 12, Earle Williams; 13, Char- 
lie Chaplin; 14, J. Stuart Blackton; 15, Lois 
Weber; 16, Clara Kimball Young; 17, Fran- 
cis X. Bushman; 18, Louise Beaudet; 19, 
Henry B. Walthall; 20, Marguerite Clark. 
Another Twenty-five Greatest in Filmdom 
— 1, Thomas A. Edison; 2, David Wark Grif- 
fith; 3, Mary Pickford; 4, Anita Stewart; 5, 
George Beban; 6, Geraldine Farrar; 7, 
Thomas H. Ince; 8, William Bitzer; 9, Billie 
Burke; 10, Douglas Fairbanks; 11, Herbert 
Brenon; 12, Earle Williams; 13, Charlie 
Chaplin; 14, J. Stuart Blackton; 15, Lois 
Weber; 16, Clara Kimball Young; 17, Fran- 
cis X. Bushman; 18, Louise Beaudet; 19, 
Henry B. Walthall; 20, Marguerite Clark; 
21, Edith Storey; 22, Mae Marsh; 23, Charles 
Kent; 24, Carlyle Blackwell; 25, Theda Bara. 

Fern, St. Louis. — I beg your pardon. 
Crane Wilbur, after getting a divorce, mar- 
ried Celia Santon, later they were divorced, 
and now he is married to Arlene Archibald. 
That was my mistake. Yes; Celia Santon 
is now married to Earle Foxe. 

Hazel P., Mt. Vernon. — Olga Petrova was 
born in Warsaw, Russia. Yes; I enjoy writing 
answers to fool questions, for labor is the 
father of pleasure, even if it is fool labor. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



147 



Ill«!l«l!lllIIII!ll!!lllllJli!!l[l!ll!Il!llll!lll!lil!iilill!! 



| Become a Players' Portrait | 
| Collector | 

| We Will Start You Off With ( 

A Splendid Set of 80 Portraits 

To those interested in Motion Pictures there is no more interesting 
J diversion for the long winter evenings than the collecting and mounting 

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M Thousands of readers of the Motion Picture Magazine are now enthusi- 

astic portrait collectors, and their rooms and dens are decorated with hun- 
M dreds of players' portraits, framed, passe-partouted or mounted in ingenious g 

|[ designs on cardboard to meet the various tastes of their owners. H 

Many of these portraits are cut from the Motion Picture Magazine, but 
= this practice spoils the magazine for future use. jj 

To meet the constantly increasing demand we are now offering FREE 
with a year's subscription to either the Magazine or Classic a set of 80 
— 434x8^4 unmounted rotogravure portraits. Those who have already received 
these portraits wonder how we can afford to give so many beautiful portraits g 

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| This set of portraits will prove a valuable addition to those you already 

g have or give you a good start on a new collection. g 

All that you have to do is to fill out coupon below and mail with regular 
g year's subscription price for the Magazine or Classic. g 

The portraits carefully packed will be mailed you promptly. 
|| Why not send your order today? g 

H Jackie Saunders Fannie Ward Lillian Gish Ethel Clayton = 

= Virginia Pearson Cleo Ridgely Mabel Normand Carlyle Blackweli = 

H Kathlyn Williams Marie Dora Dorothy Gish Mollie King = 

== King Baggot Vivian Martin Bessie Barriscale Muriel Ostriche = 

== Henry B. Walthall Dustin Farnum Norma Talmadge Jane Grey 

=§ Charles Chaplin Myrtle Stedman Douglas Fairbanks Frances Nelson 

= Beatriz Michelena Lenore Ulrich Mae Busch Marguerite Courtot 

= Earle Williams Edna Goodrich William S. Hart Ruth Roland = 

= Frank Morgan Mary Pickford Louise Glaum Annette Kellermann 

= Huntley Gordon Marguerite Clark Fay Tincher Frltzle Brunette == 

Anita Stewart Pauline Frederick Billie Burke Mary Fuller 

Lillian Walker John Barrymore Vfola Dana Mary Miles Mlnter 

= Leah Baird Owen Moore May Allison Pearl White = 

= Dorothy Kelly Virainia Norden Beverly Bayne Orml Hawley = 

M Lucille Lee Stewart Theda Bara Francis X. Bushman Edwin August 

Charles Rich man Bessie Eyton Harold Lockwood Kitty Gordon 

= Jewell Hunt J. Warren Kerrigan Mme. Petrova Mae Murray == 

=§ Alice Joyce Edna Mayo Valli Valli Blanche Sweet = 

= Peggy Hyland Helen Holmes Mrs. Sidney Drew Anita King == 

Alice Brady Clara Kimball Young Sidney Drew Wallace Reid 

J Subscription Prices: Magazine, 1 year $1.50; Classic, 1 year $1.75. Extra 

M postage: Canada 30 cents, Foreign $1.00. g 

( THE M. P. PUBLISHING CO., 

H 175 Duffield St., Brooklyn, N. Y. g 

= Gentlemen: — 

Enclosed please find for which send me a year's subscription to the g 

| MotioS Pierre- ClS^ }*»* the SO portraits mentioned above. 

= Name |= 

H Address == 

■■III 

When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



148 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Steve W. — Sorry, but I caiit give you any 
information on that picture. You will have 
to give me' more information. 

Belle T. — So you want Johnson Briscoe 
to tell your fortune from the date of your 
birth. Mr. Briscoe does not tell fortunes. 
He only casts horoscopes for the players. 
Cradstreet and Dun are the best fortune- 
tellers. Thanks for sending the program. 

Col. K. — Yes, there was a Cecil Van Auker 
with Lubin some time ago. My creed is: 
Creathe deeply, eat temperately, chew thor- 
oly, drink water copiously, clean teeth care- 
fully, bathe frequently, eliminate freely, 
laugh heartily, sleep regularly, work plan- 
fully, exercise daily, serve willingly, speak 
kindly, play some, read much, think more, 
and dare to be yourself, always cheerful, 
conscientious and brave. 




Bird — I've seen a great deal of queer guns 
around this war zone — but that's the first one 
Pve ever saw that didn't make any noise. 

Fritz F. — You ask "Do the Motion Picture 
companies have a home for all those un- 
fortunate fatherless children in the movies, 
or are they adopted after the performance 
by the actors responsible for them?" There 
are no fatherless children used in the 
movies, hence there is no home provided for 
them. Most of the children are hired just 
as any other actor is, and one of the parents 
Is always present. 

Robert P. G. — No, I dont belong to the 
"Chat Club." May I ? Remember, the longer 
you live the older you get — isn't it awful? 
Patricka De Forest is with Vitagraph. Take 
them or write to some old coin shop. Mae 
Marsh is in New York at this writing. 

Paulina M. T. — There is no negro Motion 
Picture company except one in Los Angeles. I 
know of no way to help you. You will have 
to apply directly. 

Lillian L. Mendocino. — Mae Marsh was 



born in Madrid, New Mexico, but received 
her education at various schools in Cali- 
fornia. She is only 19, but her ability and 
talent as a screen artist have brought her 
much success. House Peters is with 
Morosco. Thanks. 

Olga, 17. — Certainly you should get mar- 
ried. What is home without a — nother. But 
do you feel able to support a husband? 

Lilola. — Baroness Yon DeWitz was the 
lead in "Diana the Huntress." Paul Swan 
opposite her. Nora wasn't on the cast. 
Claire Anderson was the girl. 

Vivian R. — Now, now, you ask who is 
known as the Grape Juice Man? You also 
ask who is in favor of prohibition? Bryan, 
of course — ask me something easy. 

Mae G. — Your letters are always full of 
sparkle and brain-ticklers. The little boy 
isn't cast. Sorry. I doubt whether Theda 
Bara will answer, but you might try your 
luck. Amusement is to the mind what sun- 
shine is to the flowers, and all work and 
no play makes Jack a dull boy. 

Francis Nelson Namesake. — Yes, but 1 
thought that "Ramona" was a bit too long. 
Adda Gleason was Ramona. Monroe Salis- 
bury was Allesandro. Arthur Tavares was 
Seiior Ortegna. John Bowers was lead- 
ing man opposite Louise Huff in "The Re- 
ward of Patience." Thanks for the dime. 

Miriam F. H. — Traveling, eh? Nothing 
like it for education. Best educator I know, 
altho Dr. Johnson's are pretty good. Thanks 
for card. 

Billy, 17. — You haven't the name right. 
Be sure to get the first word, anyway. 

Blanche E. — Yes; Douglas Fairbanks cer- 
tainly has risen from the ranks in Motion 
Pictures. I didn't see "Sorrows of Love." 
Thanks muchly. 

Gertrude G. S., Australia. — So you name 
your cats after Motion Picture stars. Dont 
think they would like that — I mean the stars. 

Ethel D., Melbourne. — You can reach 
Violet Mersereau at the Hotel Apthorp, New 
York City. 

D. L., Victoria. — Louise Bates is with 
World, Al Ray with Mutual and Henry King 
with Moss. Yes, World produced "Trilby." 
I notice Olga Petrova's popularity in Aus- 
tralia. 

P. M. T., Australia.— Welcome to this de- 
partment. Send that photo right along. J 
like to keep a Rogues' Gallery of all my 
friends and admirers. I think it an honor 
to be called Mary Pickford. You should 
join the Correspondence Club. 

Coralie P., Sydney. — You will see more of 
Crane Wilbur now. The company he played 
for discontinued producing temporarily, 
but they are at it again. You say you 
think I am simple. Well, I hope so. 

Eileen B., Hobart, Tasmania. — Yes; Ro- 
berta Courtlandt is on the floor above me, 
but I hear her more than I see her. Of 
course she likes the Answer Man — why 
shouldn't she? You must put the name you 
wish to appear in the Magazine at the too 
of your letter. Grace Cunard is not married. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



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THE STAGE PLAYING CARDS 

The handsomest deck of cards ever made. Pink, cream, green and gold backs; gold edges; flexible. 
highly finished, lively and durable; fifty-two cards and joker to each pack. 

PORTRAITS OF THE GREAT STARS 

Each card contains a portrait of a great star, including Marguerite Clark, David Warfield, Julia Mar- 
lowe, Alia Nazimova, E. H. Sothern, Willie Collier, Blanche Bates, Rose Stahl, Blanche Ring, Frank Daniels, 
Anna Held, Grace George, James O'Neill, Ellen Terry, Henrietta Crosman, Frances Starr, Margaret Anglin. 
Eddie Foy, Mrs. Fiske, Harry Woodruff, Mrs. Leslie Carter, Cissy Loftus, and other well known stars. 
Most of these great players, and most of the others, have already made their appearance on the screen, and 
every one of them has made stage history, as many of them are now making Motion Picture history. Why 
not take advantage of this opportunity to make a collection of the portraits of these great stars, even if 
you do not want to use the cards to play with? (Please note that this set of cards has no connection with 
the set of Motion Picture cards in our new game called "Cast.") 

Only 50 cents a pack, in handsome telescope box, wailed to any address, postage prepaid, on receipt of 
price. (One-cent stamps accepted. If a 50-cent piece is sent, wrap it in folded paper and enclose in 
envelope in your letter. An unwrapped coin sometimes cuts thru the envelope and is lost in the mails. 
It is perfectly safe also to send a dollar bill by mail.) 

175 DUFFIELD ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



THE M. P. PUBLISHING CO. 



You Have a Beautiful Face-But Your Nose? 

IN this day and age attention to your appearance is an absolute necessity if you expect 
*■ to make the most out of life. Not only should you wish to appear as attractive as 
possible for your own self-satisfaction, which is alone well worth your efforts, but you 
will find the world in general judging you greatlv, if not v holly, by your "looks, 
therefore it pays to "look your best" at all times. Permit no one to see you 
looking otherwise; it will injure your welfare! Upon the impression you constantly 
make rests the failure or success of your life which is to be your ultimate destiny? 
My new Nose-Shaper "TRADOS" (Model 22) corrects now ill-shaped noses with- 
out operation quickly, safely and permanently. Is pleasant and does not interfere 
with one's daily occupation, being worn at night. 
ite toddy fur free booklet, which tells yenx h<>\e t*> corret t Ill-Shaped Noses without cost if not sottsfactory. 

M.TRILETY, Face Specialist, 765 Ackerrnan Bldg., Binghamton, 





When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION* PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



150 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Marguerite Snow Admirer. — Marguerite 
Snow is still playing for the Ivan Company. 
James Cruze is not playing at present. 

Pinky, 17. — Sorry, but I have no cast for 
"The Winning Punch." Oh my, yes; I do 
think it is hard to get in pictures. Better 
stay at home. 

Margery, 14. — No, "Charity" is not a serial 
picture. Of course J I like newcomers. The 
more, the merrier. Thanks for the fee. 

Melva. — I am handing your most eloquent 
letter to the Editor and asking him to pub- 
lish it. Thanks. 

Virginia Dare. — Emanuel Turner was 
Beauty in "The Tarantula." Peggy Hyland 
was opposite E. H. Sothern in "The Chat- 
tel." Louise Lovely in "The Social Bucca- 
neers," opposite "Warren Kerrigan. 

Father. — Your letter was very interesting. 

Brooklynite. — Ralph Ince is directing for 
Selznick now. No; Anita Stewart is not 
going to leave Vitagraph. Yes, do come. 
Thanks very much. 

Olga, 17. — You liked "Manhattan Mad- 
ness." That's a new name for it. Dont you 
mean "Matrimaniac"? William Riley Hatch 
was Luke. So you like John Russell. Our 
dawg is fine, thanks. He has a companion 
now by the name of Pep — Shep and Pep. 
You should get in touch with our Sales 
Manager about your magazine. 

F. A. F. — Sorry I misunderstood you. I 



am sure Miss Cunard would appreciate your 
work. Let me hear from you again. 

Olive B., Springfield. — Dont you know 
that paper is very high now? We know it 
here. *ou want a chat with Marguerite 
Clark, and I am sorry I cant devote all that 
space right here. Look up our July 1915 
issue, and you will find a chat with her. 
Thanks. 

Mary B. — If you wrote to Vitagraph, they 
might give you the names of some of the 
plays Eulalie Jensen played in. She has 
been in a good many. She was quite popular 
in "The Goddess." The "Battle Cry of War" 
hasn't been scheduled for release as yet, and 
they are thinking of changing the name. 

Lily E. Lyons.— I think yours is the first 
letter from good old Ireland. Thanks for 
the British coin. Very seldom do we see 
foreign pictures here, and they are either 
from French Gaumont or the Swedish Bio- 
graph. I presume what you relate is a trick 
of the producer. Yes, that was Lillian Tucker. 
She is still with Lasky. 

Anna D.— Now you want a painting of 
Edward Earle. What next? Yes; Anthony 
is now thinking of giving up acting and 
returning to his New Orleans home. 

Olga, 17. — What! Again? Interview with 
Conway Tearle. "Panthea" hasn't been re- 
leased as yet. Hope Santa treated you fine 
this year. 




IF PAPER CONTINUES TO INCREASE IN PRICE 
Newsie — Newspaper, sir? Only five dollars. 

Young Man-About-Town — No, thanks! I can get my news much cheaper on the 
screen at the Moving Picture show. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



151 



Typewriter Sensation 




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H. A. SMITH, 307, 231 N. Fifth Ave., Chicago, III. 
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■lIIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIIIII 



152 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Iwalani of Mani. — We have no casts with 
Arthur Allardt at present. I think he was 
with Kalem last. 

Alma E. H. — Thanks for the correction. 
And now you say that Crane Wilbur's 'third 
wife, Arlene Archibald, passed away, leaving" 
Mr. Wilbur a widower. No; Grane Wilbur 
did not play in the Pathe picture, "The 
Wasted Years," released in 1914 — that was 
an entirely different picture. I'm afraid it 
would be hard to get such a list, especially 
from Pathe. Perhaps the General Film Co. 
could supply you. 




There's a man on the M. P. Magazine's staff, 

I declare, 
When it comes to answering questions, he 
is certainly there; 
So large his brain grew 
That, first thing he knew, 
His head grew right up thru his hair! 

John Argens. 
2297 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Doreen B. Euraldine. — Tom Forman, 
whose pleasant, boyish appearance and 
magnetic personality have pleased so many 
who have seen him on the screen, was born 
on a Texas ranch. He is but 22 years old. 
He is very fond of riding, fishing and hunt- 
ing. As to Thomas Meighan, his parents 
wanted him to become a physician, but he 
followed his own desire and went on the 
stage. He has played in "Kindling," "Black- 
birds" and "The Immigrant." 

M. D. J., Winnipeg. — You will see an 
article on Mme. Petrova in the Classic 
soon. Anita Stewart is still with Vitagraph. 



Nellie L., St. Johns. — The longest series 
of pictures is "Hazards of Helen," and the 
longest serial is "Fantomas," a French 
Gaumont. Bobby Connelly is about six. 

Margot. — I am glad I came in "the nick 
cf time." Isn't that the time to come? I 
think I would like Marsipan. Is it good to 
eat? So you liked "Less Than the Dust," 
and think it one of Mary Pickford's best. 

Margaret K.— It isn't a question of the 
high cost of living so much as it is a ques- 
tion of the cost of high living. Yes; Arthur 
Hoops has passed away. E. K. Lincoln in 
"The World Against Him." 

G. P. O., Auckland. — Just write to John 
Hines, W T orld Film Co., 130 West 36th 
St., New York City. Jack Pickford is with 
Famous Players. The International coupons 
which you purchase for five cents in Aus- 
tralia can be cashed for their equivalent 
here. 

Dustin Farnum Fan. — Your fault seems 
to lie in that you take disappointment as a 
discouragement, whereas it should be a 
stimulant. I am not sure whether any 
player will answer, but you can try them 
out. Most of them do. 

Every Week. — Have been waiting for you. 
I would advise you to get in touch with 
Paramount direct. The last form in the 
Magazine goes to press on the 13th. 

J. J. W., Quincy. — Arthur James is pub- 
licity man for Metro. Alexander Gaden was 
Wilmott. 

Mollie O. — Yes; Margery Wilson opposite 
William Hart in "Draw Egan." Thanks, 
but do send along that snap. Well, we al- 
ways have time to do what we really want - 
to do. 

Humoresque. — Crane Wilbur is with Hors- 
ley. No; Dolly Hackett is no relation to 
Pearl White. Pearl White was born in 
Sedalia, Mo. No, I would write to her if 
I were you. 

Elless I. — You're right, Francis Bushman 
is not married to Beverly Bayne. Thanks 
for your verse. 

Lizzie D. — And why do you let them call 
you Lizzie? Sounds so much like a four- 
legged animal known as the Ford. Muriel 
Ostriche in "Mortmain." 

Toby, Sherbrooke. — The Bank of England 
was established in London in 1694, and is 
the treasury of the British Empire. It must 
be great sport hunting where you are. You 
go after real deer, too. 

Olga, 17. — You say you were telling a 
young man that nobody loves you, and that 
your hands were cold, and he politely told 
you that God loves you and that you could 
sit on your hands. He was certainly a cold- 
blooded and heartless' monster. So you like 
Conway Tearle now, do you? 

Pretty Baby, 16. — Bebe Daniels writes me 
that "an apple a day keeps the doctors 
away." She states that she has dropped 
ten of her uncalled-for pounds by eating 
apples regularly. Of course I look like the 
picture at the head of this department. 
Some sketch you sent me! 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



153 



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When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION TICTURE MAGAZINE. 



154 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Katherine. — You show good taste and dis- 
crimination in your list of favorites. Your 
verse was very fine. Of course I read it all 
thru. Buttermilk and sweet cider are my 
favorite beverages. 

B. M. Y., Portsmouth. — Biting your fin- 
ger-nails is a sign of nervousness, but it may 
be only a habit. Mr. Bushman runs down 
to Bushmanor quite often. 

Pax Vobiscum. — Why dont you send for a 
list of film manufacturers? Two errors 
crept into Mr. Dench's article, "Fixing Film 
Face Fungus" in the September Magazine. 
The illustration of George Webb in "Sup- 
pressed Orders" should have been credited 
to Alfred Fordyce of the American Com- 
pany, and that of Arthur Maude in "Rev- 
elations" to John T. Bond, also of the Ameri- 
can Company. 

Marjorie C. T. — It was announced that 
Ruth Stonehouse would take the place of 
Grace Cunard in "Peg o' the Ring," but 
later Grace Cunard finished the serial. Ar- 
thur Ashley opposite Alice Brady in "Miss 
Petticoat." Arthur Hoops in "The Scarlet 
Woman." Frank Belcher was Peter in "The 
Sentimental Lady." 

J. G., Fort William. — "God's Country and 
the Woman" was taken in California. The 
Limerick Editor, who writes the humorous 
and human introductions to the Limerick 
pages, is none other than Peter Wade, who 
is one of the oldest members of our staff in 
point of service, but dashingly young in 
years. 

Dorothy C. — You refer to Mae .Marsh. 
Louise Vale in "The Country Parson." Eliza- 
beth Burbridge was the daughter in "Rum- 
pelstilt Skin." Edward Jose, of Pathe, once 
played opposite Sarah Bernhardt. Pathe 
takes its Gold Rooster emblem from France, 
where the rooster is also the national em- 
blem and always captioned with the words, 
"Liberty, Equality, Fraternity." 

Patsy. — William Courtleigh, Jr., is with 
Famous Players. Surely Harold Lockwood 
is with Metro. I am sure I cant tell you 
who the lightest-salaried player is. If you 
are a failure, your wife knows the trusts 




EVOLUTION OF THE QUESTION-MARK ! 



didn't do it; she knows you have the same 
opportunity other men enjoy, and that you 
did not take advantage of it. 

A. B. J., Brooklyn. — Thanks for your very 
nice letter. I was glad to hear from you 
and hope you will write again. 

H. T., Athabasca. — The censors usually 
prohibit morbid scenes of crime where the 
only value of the scene is its morbidity or 
criminal appeal. Very few Shakespearian 
plays have been done in pictures. 

Tylie. — Wilson blazed a trail thru a 
jungle of dangerous uncertainty where no 
other man had trod. That's why I think 
that future generations will be proud of 
him. I think in time we will have our one- 
and two-reel plays back again. I'm always 
glad to hear from you. 

Still Jim. — Who was Belshazzar? A 
Biblical guy what had a feast, and a sad 
one. What do I know of the Nebular Hy- 
pothesis? Nothing; and that is all anybody 
else knows. It is a theory holding that the 
stars have been evolved from a widely dif- 
fused nebulous form of matter. Omar? I 
never cease reading him, that's what I think 
of him. 

Josephine M. K. — Quite an experience you 
had with your cold. Exercise, eating tem- 
perately and a cold shower after rising are 
the best preventives I know of. You can 
knock a good man down, but he wont stay 
down. A good man may be defeated and 
run out of town, but he will always rise 
again and come back. 

Olga, 17. — Dear child, time you had a 
birthday. Dont they have them any more 
in Jersey? A whole lot of thanks to you, 
my dear, and may you live all the days of 
your life. 

Loquacious Edna. — Glad to hear from you 
again. No, I have promised not to mention 
that fact, but it wasn't Warren Kerrigan. 
I was glad to see you. Come in some time 
again. 

Small Twin Girl. — You say you have a 
severe case of Farnumitis. Alas! that is 
an incurable disease — until a handsomer 
man comes along. Oh, you are simply jeal- 
ous, and jealousy is merely the apprehen- 
sion of superiority. I assure you that your 
apprehension is unfounded. 

Marjorie E. — Alice Brady's next picture is 
"Frou-Frou." Marie Dressier and John 
Hines in "Tillie Wakes Up." Wait until 
you see Henry Walthall in "The Truant 
Soul," which was released Xmas Day. Henry 
Walthall claims this to be his masterpiece. 

M. E., Grand Rapids. — Thanks for them 
kind woids. You can say that again. 
Thomas Meighan is with Lasky. Of course 
I want you to come again. 

Magdalen W., Atlanta. — Come, now., dont 
accuse me of not reading my letters. I al- 
ways read every letter I receive, whether 
they contain roses or rocks. Of course I do. 

Nina G., Port Henry. — Nicholas Dunaew 
is with Universal. Virginia is the State that 
Is noted as "The Mother of Presidents," 
having produced eight. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



155 








THE ANSWER ttADY, 



By ROSE TAPLEY 

Editorial Note: Letters for this department 
should be addressed to Miss Rose Tapley, care of 
Vitagraph Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Tapley will 
answer by mail if an addressed, stamped envelope is 
enclosed. While the articles entitled "How to Get In" 
are running, Miss Tapley will not answer^ letters on 
that subject, nor will she answer any questions in the 
Magazine that are not of general interest, nor any 
that properly belong to the Department of The 
Answer Man. 

Hermia Dear. — It is against rules for 
visitors to be allowed and unless they are 
from a great distance they are not permitted 
at all. I am sorry and only wish I could 
invite you to come. I shall think of you, 
tho. 

Helen "W., Schenectady. — I was in the 
picture of which you speak. Have been in 
a number of the "V.L.S.E." releases lately. 
I enjoy writing these articles and it makes 
me very happy to hear that you all seem to 
like them. 

Dixie Jack. — Your letters are so nice I 
thoroly enjoy them, dear boy. No, Lillian 
Walker is not related to me in any way, but 
she is a dear and I threaten to spank her 
occasionally when she gets into mischief, 
of which she is full. Every one who knows 
her loves her and rejoices in her great and 
growing popularity. 

G. C. H., E. P. T.— Your letter, with its 
enclosure, was greatly appreciated. It must 
be exciting and interesting on the border 
just now, with all the boys in khaki doing 
their level best. Old-fashioned mothers are 
pretty sweet, tho, aren't they? And some 
one who loves just you best in the world 
makes life worth while, doesn't it? I'd take 
a good liver toniCj, but consult a regular 
physician first. I'd love the snaps. 

Miriam Madyson. — I congratulate you 
with all my heart upon your securing an 
opportunity to enter the movies. That is 
truly fine for you. I have been introduced 
to Miss Bayne and thought her very sweet 
and lovely. I met Marguerite Courtot at the 
Madison Square Garden Exposition and she 
is a dear little thing, too. 

Dearest Little Narcissus. — Bless your 
dear heart! I am happy that my letter may 
have helped a little. Dont you worry about 
your appearance or your height, but just go 
on thinking lovely thoughts, being truly Kind 
and helpful to others, and no one will ever 
stop to think anything but that you are a 
dear, lovable girl whom every one enjoys 
knowing and wants to be associated with. 



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156 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



II 



$50 for a Good Story II 

$25 for Another Not Quite So Good || 

$10 for the Next Best 

And $5 Each for the Next Ten jj 

Have you a story to tell? Have you a story || 

about yourself, or perhaps your family, or ances- || 

tors, or friends, or acquaintances? Surely you || 

have, for there are few men or women in this || 

world who have not some dramatic story to tell. || 

Think of some episode in your own life, in the H 

life of another, or, if you possess the gift of H 

imagination, write a story that is purely imagina- || 

tive, but at the same time is TRUE TO LIFE, || 

and send it in to us, to compete for one of the H 

prizes set forth above. There is no entrance fee || 

and anybody may compete. No manuscript will || 

be returned unless it is accompanied with a || 

stamped, addressed envelope. The scripts that win || 

prizes will become our property. 11 

We Demand Only One Condition: 

Limit Your Story to Five Hundred Words jj 

Millions attend the Motion Picture theaters || 

nightly. To satisfy the ever-increasing demands || 

of these millions of movie fans, the great pro- || 

ducing companies must have stories. Several of || 

these film corporations, who are exceedingly || 

anxious to please the movie patrons, have acknowl- || 

edged to us that they need stronger plots. We || 

want to encourage the art of plot writing. || 

Absolutely No Technical Skill Needed jj 

All the big studios now employ writers who || 

work out the stories into scenes, and put them in || 

proper shape for the screen. But there is a great || 

dearth of stories. The companies must have new |1 

plots, new ideas, new incidents, and they are || 

obliged to depend in a great measure upon the |f 

public. .Moreover, the studios are now willing to || 

pay big prices for plots alone. The price is con- |1 

stantly rising, and, at the present time, |f 

From $50 to $1,000 Is Being Paid II 
For Plots Alone 

Your story may be incomplete — lack dramatic II 

interest, suspense, climax, surprise, novelty, char- || 

acterization or any of the other elements that go || 

to make up a salable dramatic story. If you think || 

so you may submit it to us for criticism. For a II 

fee of $1.00 we shall be happy to point out to || 

you the defects in your work, indicating why || 

certain things should not be done, and suggesting || 

others that will materially improve your script. || 

In other words, we shall be glad to collaborate H 

with you in turning out a strong and appealing || 

tale. This work will be done only by well-known || 

scenario writers, who have had studio experience, || 

including the editors of the Motion Picture || 

Magazine and Classic. jj| 

In addition to an honest, upbuilding criticism, II 

|| we will mail you a list of producing companies, to = = 

1 1 whim you can submit your story in case you do II 

= | not wish to enter it in this contest. You may II 

= | enter^ your story whether or ^ not it has been 1 1 

1 1 criticized, but under no conditions will we answer II 

II questions regarding the merits of stories. Thus II 

|l we shall be treating all writers alike. CRITICISM II 

1 1 OF YOUR STORY/ IS ENTIRELY OPTIONAL II 

II WITH YOURSELF, H 

|1 THE CONTEST CLOSES ON MARCH 31, 1917. I! 

II THE SCENARIO SERVICE BUREAU II 

|1 175 Duffield Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. City || 



= 



Marie, Reading, Pa. — My dear child, I 
will see that the Editor gets the votes for 
Edna Maison and Raymond Gallagher. I 
have been very busy and out of town for 
some time and my mail has been accumulat- 
ing. Forgive me, wont you? I, too, always 
like to help young folks or the ones who are 
otherwise neglected. I will ask Mr. Brew- 
ster to publish their photos at some future 
date, so watch patiently for them. 

Mary Dear. — Your plan is an excellent 
one. Write to Miss Jensen again and ask 
her when it will be convenient for you to 
see her. It is rather difficult for people to 
visit the studio, but as you live so far away 
she may be able to pass you thru the gate. 
She is a splendid woman and will do her 
best for you, anyway. 

R. A. H. — Anita's eyes are brown, with 
black lashes, and her hair is a light chestnut 
brown. Yes, I have met both Miss Bayne 
and Mr. Bushman and they both are delight- 
ful. Am glad that you like this department. 
I try to be as helpful as I can. 

Dear Miriam of Utica. — I, too, am very 
fond of Canada, and have had cousins in 
Montreal. An artist always likes to receive 
an acknowledgment of his public's appre- 
ciation, but that public must not be selfish 
and expect immediate answers from their 
favorites, as they are usually too busy un- 
less they have a secretary to do it for them. 
They always enjoy receiving letters from 
admirers, however. 

Bertha McC, Ottawa. — Bobby and Helen 
Connelly are darling children and entirely 
unspoiled, owing to the training and care 
which their mother gives them. Am so 
glad you like so many of our players. They 
are really just as nice as you think them. 
You'd adore dear Mother Maurice. I can 
imagine nothing sweeter than to be able to 
grow old as beautifully and as sweetly as 
she has done. Best love, little girl, and 
dont get too lonely for that dear mother of 
yours and big sister. 

S. M. C, Tex. — Bryn Mawr is a splendid 
woman's institution. Am sure you could 
not but help developing into a very lovely 
woman if you graduate from there. So you 
are fond of dogs, too. You should see my 
"Victor." Just slain "dog." I picked up a 
starving kitten a year ago, and now she has 
two dear little babies, herself. It's hard 
work not to bring all the stray cats and 
dogs home I see. Now, Honey, get busy at 
your practicing and study real hard on the 
languages, and dont you worry about any- 
thing until after you've been thru Bryn 
Mawr. Best love, 

Leo F. G. — I think Miss Courtot is a very 
lucky girl to have so ardent an admirer that 
in payment for stepping on her foot and 
because of her charm you are going to work 
for her in the Popularity Contest. She is 
really a sweet, dear girl and I am sure will 
appreciate your votes. 

J. G. M. — Queenie Rosson is the sister of 
Helene and Dick Rosson, and is unmarried, 
I believe. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



157 



Dear Little Sister from Julia Richman 
High School. — Your friend has simply been 
too busy to write or else in new environ- 
ments has drifted away, but I am sure you 
are not different from other girls. Your 
letter is that of a sweet, normal, sensible 
girl, at the romantic age when she thinks 
she is "different." Keep on with your writ- 
ing and let me hear from you again, dear. 

Patsy Dear. — Anne Schaefer, of the West- 
ern Vitagraph, is the one who collects the 
canceled stamps for charity. Thanks for 
all the nice things you say. You know I 
appreciate them, I am sure. 

M. A. R., Okla. — I am afraid that the 
article mentioned is only an advertisement 
which reads well but may have no merit. 
Will have the matter looked up, however. 

Little Mary. — Mary Pickford's curls are 
natural and she is as sweet and as lovable 
as you think her. Wm. Hart is a great 
favorite of mine. 

Marie Dear from Okla. — I wish I knew 
the address of the dear little girl who could 
not see the pictures as you do. I wrote her 
at once, but the letter was returned un- 
claimed. Write again, dear. 

Elizabeth, Prince Albert, Sask. — Do try 
to see Charlie Chaplin in "The Vagabond." 
I just wanted to hug him, he was so dear, 
and as a rule, altho I may laugh at some cf 
his funny antics, I have wished he wouldn't 
draw the line quite so closely between 
comedy and vulgarity. Mr. Forman may 
have mislaid your letters, or perhaps hasn't 
a secretary to write his letters for him and 
is too busy to answer them himself. 

Eileen McC, Australia. — Write the 
"Answer Man" in care of the Magazine. It 
is a great pleasure to hear from my sisters 
and brothers across the big ocean and I am 
never too busy to try to drop them a line 
thru thS Magazine and to send my love to 
them. Your letter was so nice. 

Betty from Sunny Italy. — Mary Pickford 
is as dear a sweet, beautiful girl in real life 
as she is on the screen. So you'd like to be 
a "vampire" in pictures. Well, sometimes 
I want to be too, but I cant. Stick to your 
painting and realize that your parents can 
see what is best for you, as a rule, far better 
than you, with the inexperience of youth. 
There are no more divorces amongst pro- 
fessionals than amongst non-professionals; 
it is only because they are constantly in the 
public eye. 

Dear Anna and Catherine, B'klyn. — It is 
against rules for me to give advice on how 
to get into the movies at present, as others 
are doing it in another department. I wish 
I could encourage you, but to be honest I 
prefer to discourage. 

Annie D., Australia. — Yes, dear; Clara 
K. Young used to be with the Vitagraph and 
I am very fond of her. Am so glad you like 
the department. I do wish it were possible 
for me to visit Australia and meet all the 
delightful people I hear from in your coun- 
try. Am glad for your happiness, dear, and 
hope that you will write me again. 




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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




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My Dear Lone from Ridgewood. — You ask 
if I am writing for the pleasure of doing it. 
My one and only idea in writing is to 
find a medium thru which I may personally 
reach the boys and girls, young and old, 
who need advice and encouragement and I 
have never asked or received a penny for 
my work. I think of the little children who 
are very poor, for I was very poor myself 
when I was a child and am far from rich 
now, but I am always ready and anxious to 
do anything I can to help them. I cannot 
give money — I haven't it to give. 

You Dear Little Sparrow from Somer- 
ville. — It is only the ignorant and preju- 
diced who, today, consider that all actors 
and actresses are bad. Every profession is 
bound to have its black sheep and the stage 
and the studio are no more immune than 
any other walk in life. You will find the 
majority of those who are successful and 
loved in it are living simple, wholesome 
lives. Best wishes, dear". 

Mary C. from Canton. — Belle Bruce is a 
clever, intelligent girl who loves her work 
and strives to give her public her best. I 
love her dearly and agree with you in all 
the nice things you have said about her. 

Jack Russell. — Your letter has been mis- 
laid or I should have answered it before. 
Am so glad you are subscribing for another 
year because of my department. I wish 
every one who reads it would do the same 
thing and then it would make the Editor feel 
that it was really worth giving more space 
to. I dont know of a studio nearer than the 
Eastern studio, Providence, and I believe 
they have closed. Good wishes, dear boy. 

Margaret M. — The Moving Pictures have 
time and again proved a blessing and a com- 
fort to many a lonely heart. If you have 
ability and character I can see no objection 
to you becoming an actress, but I believe 
that we owe something to our parents and 
you should try to obtain your father's con- 
sent before you attempt to take up the work. 
Yonr height is greatly against you for pic- 
tures, but not on the stage. 

Peg o' the North. — Edith Storey is very 
clever. I have known her since she was a 
little girl. I am sure that no player would 
be offended to have a little girl speak to her 
politely and tell her that she had enjoyed 
her work. Miss Schaefer is a lovely, woman- 
ly woman and one can say little more in 
describing any one, according to my views. 
It is very sweet of you to want to form a 
"Rose Tapley Club" and I appreciate it very 
much, but it would mean a lot of hard work, 
dear. Best love, and let me know when you 
come to New York. 

Dear Barney from Newport. — I haven't, 
a photo at present, but if you will send a 
quarter to the News Service Department of 
the Vitagraph Company with a request for 
an autographed photograph, by the time this 
is printed they will have plenty of them. 
Thank you for your kind opinion. 

Dear Miss A. — I wish you every success. 
Thank you for your letter. 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



159 



Marcia L. M. — You mustn't believe all 
you hear about actors and actresses. Ad- 
dress an actor or actress in care of the com- 
pany by whom he or she is employed. Clara 
K. Young is a very beautiful and sweet girl, 
and well worthy of any one's admiration and 
affection. Haven't seen Miss Clark in pic- 
tures, but she was very sweet on the stage. 

Dear Francis. — Your letter was very 
sweet and I do hope you find some lucrative 
and congenial occupation for your regular 
work. 

Dear Cissie from Australia. — Was that 
a Vitagraph release? It sounds familiar, 
but cant just place it. Even tho we are so 
far apart it is nice to feel that you can see 
me on the screen and I can receive such 
nice letters from you, dear. Do write again. 

My Friend frcm Wandsworth, Eng. — 
Thank you so much for your very kind 
letter. I am waiting to receive some new 
pictures now, but haven't a sign of one at 
present. Will you write and remind me 
that I have promised to send you one. 

Dear Fay. — I should love to have you send 
me one of your pictures. Good wishes to 
you, dear, and I hope to meet you some 
time. 

My Dear Raymond from: Kansas. — Your 
letter was like a breeze from your dear, big 
West, and it made me very proud and happy 
to receive it. Honest admiration end appre- 
ciation are always an honor to the one re- 
ceiving it. I'd love to hear some of those 
stories. Wont you write me about them. And 
some day I'll write them up into interesting 
stories, I hope, and give them to the world. 
Please write me again. Your letter was de- 
lightful. 

Dear Kitty from "Smoketown." — I am 
so pleased with your letter and with the 
dear little picture it contained. Thank you, 
dear. I wish I might meet you in person. 
Indeed, Nitra Frazer is a dear girl. 

Lillian Florence. — Carlyle Blackwell is 
married, but his wife is not playing now. 
He has two children. Blanche Sweet is un- 
married. Glad you like the Motion Picture 
Magazine. 

Dear Girl from Sydney, N. S. Wales, 
Australia. — It seems so strange to think of 
the skating season beginning in April there. 
Our seasons are just reversed. You are tak- 
ing a sensible course. Get your experience 
on the stage before you attempt to get into 
the movies. Best wishes, dear. Do write 
again. 

Dear Elliott, Jr. — It must be rather hard 
on you to be the only boy in so large a 
family of girls, but you have the right kind 
of material in you to survive their petting 
and bossing. There, isn't really much call 
for toe-dancing in the movies at present. 
Stick to the legitimate stage. I shouldn't be 
surprised if the pendulum swung back to 
the stage again for many professionals as 
conditions are at present. 

Mabel B., Plattsbukg, N. Y. — The letter 
I sent you was returned to me unclaimed. 
What was wrong? 




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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



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About Our Family 

(Continued from page 72) 

rite his play on the bak portch and wen 
ever i wud go round ther and make eny 
noize he wud box my eers and kick me 
around to the frunt yard, then wen 2 or 
3 rag men cum to buy rags pa got mad 
cuz they bothered him and he kicked 
them over the ally fense he sed he cudnt 
rite a peece play wen evry body was 
button in. 

at last he got it all rote and sent it 
to wun of the moven pikcher cumpanys 
and the next day he kwit his job on the 
ice wagun cuz he sed wot was the use 
of workin on the ice wagun wen riten 
plays was so much eazier then totin ice. 
but in a cuple of days the play cum bak 
and wen he opened it he found a letter 
in it. the mo^en pikcher peeple wanted 
to know how he was abel to send such 
stuff thro the male with out gettin 
pinched, that made pa mad and he sed 
damit 3 times and went down to get his 
job bak on the ice wagun. 

but i was glad cuz he wudnt giv the 
rest of the famly eny more muney for 
stamps and they cudnt send in eny more 
plays, pa sed the moven pikcher cum- 
panys didnt want no plays nohow and 
that they was in kahoots with the guv- 
ermunt just so the guvermunt cud sell 
more stamps, wun day wen fred wasnt 
home pa traded the tiperiter for a dolar 
watch and that made fred mad and he 
went and got a job drivin a auter truck 
and sis wanted sum new does so she 
got a job in a candy store and pa wudnt 
giv ma no more muney for stamps so 
she didnt rite eny more plays, but pa 
was perty good he took the muney that 
he useter spend for stamps and took us 
evry night to the pikcher show and 
scribed for the motion pikcher magaseen 
and home is like it useter be. so long 

Jimmie Skid. 



Patter from the Pacific 

{Continued from page 14) 

Quite a lot of excitement and changes go- 
ing on all the time. The rainy season has 
started in all its glory and quite some 
anxiety is being registered off the screen by 
those who feel that the cutting down in the 
force that the- companies do out here during 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



161 



the inclement weather will erase their names 
from the pay-roll. 

Few of the fans are aware of the real truth 
regarding Ben Turpin. Ben is not cross-eyed 
as is the general impression. He is only 
afflicted this way in one eye. In other words, 
one eye is crossed and the other perfectly 
normal, and when he closes his right eye the 
left one will straighten out. He became this 
way playing the character of "Happy Hooli- 
gan" on the stage, which called for him to 
look cross-eyed most of the time. 

Harry McCoy is now a full-fledged director 
at Keystone. He plays the lead in his own 
pictures, too. The only thing left for Harry 
now is to turn the crank of the camera also. 

Harry Ham got all excited, the other week, 
and would have entered the auto races at 
Ascot Park but for one word. Harry used 
to be an auto-racer before he went into 
pictures, and has won several big races. 
Just before the Ascot race, a representative 
from an auto concern made him a proposi- 
tion to drive a car in the race, and Harry 
enthusiastically went to Al Christie, director 
of the Christie Company, and told him the 
glad tidings and asked if it would be all 
right. The day of the race Harry was hard 
at work at the studio. Wonder what the 
word was. 

Margarita Fischer and Harry Pollard claim 
that they have the most original and unique 
studio in existence. It is in the Indian 
village at the San Diego Exposition grounds. 

Great hunt on at the American studio at 
Santa Barbara. They are trying their hard- 
est to find tome character that George Perio- 
lat has not played, but so far have been 
unsuccessful. They call him "The Man of 
a Thousand Faces" at the studio. He never 
looks the same. Tom Chatterton swears that 
George sleeps in his make-up. 

Claire McDowell is learning to operate a 
camera very rapidly. She has shown great 
progress, and in a recent feature she took 
several close-ups of Irene Hunt, and they 
turned out so well that they kept them in the 
picture. All the camera-men are uneasy out 
at Universal City now. 

Fox Film plant had a big fire, with a loss 
of thirty thousand dollars, but most of the 
stages were saved, the fire taking place in 
the executive offices mostly. All were on the 
job working the next day. The keenest loss 
was Hank Mann's. He had half of his 
mustache burnt off, and held the picture 
back until another one could be made. 

Great noise at the Fine Arts studio — Doug- 
las Fairbanks beating up about a hundred 
extras for a picture. No exertion for "Doug" 
at all. 

Tom Chatterton is working in the "Kolb 
and Dill" comedies at American. 

Syd Chaplin is helping Charlie with the 
directing of his pictures. 

Harold Lockwood has bought a handsome 
white Marmon car. Some class! 

Lots more next month. 



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162 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



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Physical Grace on the Screer. 

{Continued from page 47) 
Frederick and Jose Collins get much of 
their screen grace from mountain-climb- 
ing in outing clothes. 

Grace is a part of your make-up that 
must not be washed off. It is a habit of 
body, just as cheerfulness is a habit of 
mind. Wherever you go, whatever you 
do, retain your ease and accuracy of 
movement. Cultivate that happy faculty 
of expending just sufficient energy to do 
a thing well without an unnecessary 
movement, the ability to relax easily and 
avoid physical and mental tension. Men- 
tal action can never, be more than a part 
of acting. Mr. Barrett well said that 
"every gift, physical and mental, that 
nature can bestow will be found useful 
to an actor," and Douglas Fairbanks put 
it this way: "It (acting) begins in the 
heart, is edited by the brain, and ex- 
presses itself thru the body." 

Wallace Reid at Home 

(Continued from page 69) 
art of cooking, and any one who is suf- 
ficiently lucky enough to receive an in- 
vitation to his home knows the joys of 
ranch cuisine in bungalow setting. 

Dinner finished, Wally and his wife 
prepare either for an evening's call at 
some friend's house or to receive them- 
selves. Few stars of the screen have 
more interesting acquaintances than these 
two, and their circle of friends has broad- 
ened beyond the limitations of the Mov- 
ing Picture world in and around Los 
Angeles, to a bigger world of other ac- 
tivities. 

An accomplished musician, Wally 
Reid does everything but sing in public. 
He is an adept at the violin and string 
instruments, and until neighbors -moved 
near-by it is reported that he played the 
cornet; the ukelele is his slave, the piano 
the child of his fingers. 

Seriously, however, there is strong 
verification in the life of Wallace Reid 
and Dorothy Davenport which condemn^ 
the oft-repeated aspersions against the 
members of the Hollywood film colony. 

Why She Is Going to Stay in Pictures 

(Continued from page 106) 
desert — not a bit of it ! And it is largely 
because she feels that she owes a debt 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



163 



to the Motion Picture that she has re- 
fused to return to the stage, tho she 
declares most emphatically that she has 
not lost her love for the stage itself. 

"The actual pleasure of appearing on 
the stage and coming into personal con- 
tact with my audiences appeals tremen- 
dously to me," declared Miss Clark, in 
speaking of her decision, "but, when I 
actually faced the decision as to whether 
I should return to the stage or not, it 
flashed upon me that I was abandoning 
the many for the few in giving up my 
Motion Picture friends for the compara- 
tively small number that would find their 
way into the theater, even if I were sure 
of theatrical success. 

"I had spent two years of hard work 
on the study of the technique of the 
screen and I'm not going to let that long 
period of hard work go for nothing; so 
I shall continue to appear on the screen. 
I enjoy my work just as a man enjoys 
his business. But there is no career in 
the world — no matter how brilliant — 
that could be half so enjoyable to me 
as a quiet home in the country with my 
friends and my pets." And no doubt, 
like the little child who took the clock 
apart to see how it ran, she will steal 
time enough to carry out her wishes. 

The Island of Desire 

(Continued from page 57) 

He touched the pink globes, with a 
shadow of the expert's pride. "Very 

fine — jewels " he muttered. "Very — 

fine " 

Later, Chalmers and Lelia stood again 
in the open day. She was weeping 
quietly, and he watched her tears with 
the awe of a man before the incompre- 
hensible feminine. 

"Dear," he said gently — "dear, the 
ship is waiting for us ; and I am waiting 
for you. Will you come with me, Lelia ? 
God helping me, I will never let you be 
sorry, if you'll give me your life." 

But still she sobbed on, and at last the 
trouble was out on a tide of tears. 

"They say, trios' mans, you did come 
to fin' trios' pink pearls!" she cried. 
"You foun' them. Why you not go 
'way? Tha's all you come for — jus' 
thos' pink pearls !" 

Chalmers laughed aloud and caught 



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arms. 

"Sweetheart — I came 
cried, and he believed it. 
pearls, if you say so, but I wont 
without you !" 

He bent and kist her, and her lips re- 
turned his kiss. And, as they embraced, 
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Some time ago Mr. Harry Myers, popu- 
lar player and director, wrote a clever ar- 
ticle on "How to Get In," which was 
published in the November Motion Pic- 
ture Classic, and which apparently cre- 
ated quite a commotion, judging from the 
following interesting and clever letter 
from Mr. Myers himself: 

Mr. Motion Picture Classic: 

Rich people, poor people, beggar people, 
chefs, doctors, lawyers, merchants, plumb- 
ers, piano-tuners, waiters, stenographers, 
waitresses, Pullman porters, bricklayers, 
chauffeurs, motormen, barbers, young men, 
old men, middle-aged men, fat women, thin 
women, young women, old women, chickens, 
broilers, mediums, show-girls, chorus-men, 
engineers, surveyors, musicians, white 
people, dark people, red people, brown 
people, yellow people, and quite a number 
of "green ones," all want to "get in the 
movies." And nearly half the people of the 
United States and Canada want to "get in." 

I never thought that one firm could sell 
that many issues of one magazine, but it 
seems to me that half the world has read my 
article on "How to Get In," and two-thirds 
of the world wrote to me just on general 
principles. 

The letter-carrier in Providence, on learn- 
ing that I had gone South, to my winter 
quarters, raised his hands to the above and 
gave thanks, and the other day the mail- 
man here asked the boss, "What does that 
guy, Myers, do to get all this mail? Does 
he give things away for nothing, or does he 
write to himself? And does he know that 
"Us" letter-carriers are humans — the same 
as him? Why dont he get a truck and get 
his own mail? And if his mail gets any 
heavier I'll give my job up in favor of an 
octopus, and I'll bet, at that, that an octopus 
would be shy a couple of arms." 

The actors in the place are getting jealous, 
and the boss hates to see the morning mair 

{Continued on page 166) 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



165 





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166 



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{Continued from page 164) 
come in, as his couple of letters are sand- 
wiched in between my four million. The 
hallway is cluttered up when the mail-man 
leaves, and the actors and actresses, the 
property men and carpenters are sore 'cause 
they cant get near the office, so they can 
say good-morning to the boss. 

My article was published in your noble 
magazine over a month ago, and instead of 
the letters diminishing, they are getting 
worse. I guess most of the people start at 
the cover and read it word for word, all 
the way thru, and they have just arrived 
at that article of mine, and now they're only 
starting to write. 

Whatever you do, dont ever send me an- 
other one of those blanks to fill out — not 
that I mind doing it, 'cause I dont. I'm 
ready at all times to lend a helping hand, 
when it comes to filling your pages; but the 
point is this — I cant stand the pressure. 
You know I dont own this firm. I work for 
a living and receive a weekly stipend of so 
much money per week, and in order for me 
to answer these letters it takes money — 
money for paper, money for stamps, money 
for typewriter ribbons, money for the repair 
of the "L. C. Smith" (this is an ad — they 
ought to give me a new one for this), and 
now the stenographer wants to be paid over- 
time, and all of it comes out of my wages. 

The other day I had two hours off, and 
was going to take a little drive around town, 
but couldn't do it, as I needed gas, and if I 
bought the gas I couldn't answer my mail, 
so I remained around the studio, and that 
night gave the Government four dollars for 
stamps. I dont mind buying the Govern- 
ment engravings, and laying out this money, 
but it's getting too strong. They telegraph 
me in the first place and send the telegrams 
"Collect." The other day they caught me 
for $1.08. Then again, they dont put the 
proper amount of postage on their letters 
and photo-folders and I have to pay out 
again. 

A young lady writes me from Wilkes 
Barre, with acid or some darn-fool thing; 
anyhow, the only visible part of the writing 
informed me that I would have to light a 
match, hold it under the letter and the heat 
would bring out the writing. I tried it, 
but it took a dozen boxes of safety matches 
and I had a bedspread to pay for. She had 
written eight pages with this acid, and when 
the "spread" caught fire I had read only two 
pages. The two pages were enougn to tell 
me the news — she wanted to know "How 
to Get In" and, also, that if I would come 
to Wilkes Barre she would give me a kiss. 
So I figured the railroad fare from Jackson- 
ville, Florida, to Wilkes Barre. Pennsylvania, 
and found that I could buy nearly two 
thousand two-cent stamps, and possibly I 
could get some of these letters answered. 

Another thing: These people who have 
written me and are patiently awaiting their 

{Continued on page 1681 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



167 




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There is a certain charm about stories that you know 
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MARY FUIXER 
DUSTIN FARNUM 



CXEO MADISON 
BLANCHE SWEET 



Dont miss one of the series and then helo us to decide 
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168 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



(Continued from page 166) 
answers are starting to get sore, as they are 
now writing and telling me that they will 
continue to write till I do answer. 

You know, between reading scenarios, 
drawing scene-plots, getting out property- 
plots, acting and directing your own pic- 
tures, answering mail, sending out photo- 
graphs, arguing with the boss about the cost 
of your pictures, jollying the actors so they 
wont get sore — if they have to go into water 
in November, or, perhaps, you want to hit 
them with a pie or throw a wooden brick 
at them, or maybe a few gross of eggs, 
or something like that — takes up all the 
energy one has. And on top of all this the 
people who want to "get in" start panning 
you 'cause you dont answer their letters! 

It's too much, Mr. Classic, for even me tc 
handle, and I wish you would tell me not 
"How to Get In," but "How to Get Out of 
This Jam I'm In!" 

Oh! By the way, how would a serial 
sound on "How to Get Out of the Business"? 

Get the subscribers to write it up and — let 
the movie people take the tip — possibly some 
brewery might take it up and give the 
actors saloons; or perhaps some railroad 
would like a movie actor for its president, 
or some good national bank needs a new 
president. 

If you do start one of those serials and 
anything like that does come in, wire me at 
once, before the rest jump at the job. 

Wishing you the best of everything and 
hoping and praying that you think of some 
way to help me — say, by paying the stenog- 
rapher or buying the stamps and paper, etc. 
— I beg to remain, 

Breathlessly, 

Harry C. Myers. 
Vim Studios, 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Miss Fritzi Remont, one of our regu- 
lar contributors from the Coast, sends 
us the following letter and photo, which 
speak for themselves : 

Enclosed herewith please find photograph 
of a young man of Los Angeles. He is but 
an extra in various Motion Picture com- 
panies, but I considered his face exceedingly 
attractive and expressive, and, if it is pos- 
sible for you to give the photograph .room 
in your magazine, I believe it would aid him 
in rising in his profession. He is a toe- 
dancer, a classic dancer and exceedingly 
talented as well as versatile. 

It is rather difficult, as you'll doubtless 
admit, to gain headway when one is but a 
young extra, and I am wondering if your 
magazine would not care to start the idea 
of giving the aspiring newcomers photo- 
room? Why must they be all stars or such 
as have arrived? If good-looking and 
clever, why not print their pictures? I be- 
lieve this would be an aid to studios as well 




as a publicity campaign for the young people 
who are trying very hard to deserve recog- 
nition. 

David Stuart Richardson is but nineteen 
years old. He excels in emotional parts, and 
is graceful, sensitive and high-strung. 

If you can dc anything with this picture, 
you would surely aid a deserving lad. 

My Ambition 

By ELEANOR CHASE 

Of course each girl's ambition is to be 
a picture star; but mine has, strangely, 
not been realized, so far. So I've been 
thinking lately, as I sit alone at night, 
I'd better plan some other "job" in case 
things are not right. Director — camera- 
man — or "props" ? No ; none of those will 
do! I dont — oh yes! I'll be the one who 
writes the interview. Now, dont you think 
that that is next to being a star? A card — 
"The M. P. Magazine" — will take you 
very far into the homes and lives of all 
the shadows on the screen. Oh my ! that 
privilege is fit for any king or queen. To 
daily intercourse with them and learn their 
history — to hear and tell to other folks 
some great one's mystery. I think that 
next to being a star, I'd like to interview. 
Now, look at it from all its sides and tell 
me, dont you, too ? 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



Nuxated Iron to Make New Age of 
Beautiful Women and Vigorous Iron Men 



Say Physicians — Quickly Puts Roses Into the Cheeks of Women and Most 

Astonishing- Youthful Power Into the Veins of Men — It Often Increases the 

Strength and Endurance of Delicate, Nervous "Run Down" Folks 

200 Per Cent, in Two Weeks' Time. 



A Wonderful Discovery Which Promises to Mark a New Era in Medical Science 



SINCE the remarkable discovery of organic iron, Nux- 
ated Iron or "Fer Nuxate," as the French call it, 
has taken the country by storm. It is conserva- 
tively estimated that over five million persons daily are 
taking it in this country alone. Most astonishing results 
are reported from its use by both physicians and laymen. 
So much so that well-known doctors predict that we shall 
soon have a new age of far more beautiful, rosy-cheeked 
women and vigorous iron men. 

Dr. King, a New York physician and author, when 
interviewed on the subject, said: "There can be no 
vigorous iron men without iron. Pallor means anemia. 
Anemia means iron deficiency. The skin of anemic 
men and women is pale. The flesh flabby. The muscles 
lack tone; the brain fags and the memory fails and 
often they become weak, nervous, irritable, despondent 
and melancholy. When the iron goes from the blood of 
women, the roses go from their cheeks. 

"In the most common foods of America, the starches, 
sugars, table syrups, candies, polished rice, white bread, 
soda crackers, biscuits, macaroni, spaghetti, tapioca, sago, 
farina, degerminated corn-meal, no longer is iron to be 
found. Refining processes have removed the iron of 
Mother Earth from these impoverished foods, and silly 
methods of home cookery, by throwing down the waste 
pipe the water in which our vegetables are cooked, are 
responsible for another grave iron loss. 

"Therefore, if you wish to preserve your youthful vim 
and vigor to a ripe old age, you must supply the iron 
deficiency in your food by using some form of organic 
iron, just as you would use salt when your food has not 
enough salt." 

Dr. Saner, who has studied abroad in great European 
meddcal institutions, said: "As I have said a hundred 
times over, organic iron is the greatest of all strength 
builders. If people would only throw away patent medi- 
cines and nauseous concoctions and take simple nuxated 
iron, I am convinced that the lives of thousands of per- 
sons might be saved who now die every year from 
pneumonia, grippe, consumption, kidney, liver, heart 
trouble, etc. The real and true cause which started 
their disease was nothing more nor less than a weakened 
conditiou brought on by a lack of iron in the blood. 

"Not long ago a man came to me who was nearly 
half a century old and asked me to give him a pre- 
liminary examination for life insurance. I was aston- 
ished to find him with the blood pressure of a boy of 
twenty and as full of vigor, vim and vitality as a young 
man; in fact, a young man he really was, notwithstand- 
ing his aga The secret, he said, was taking iron — 
Nuxated Iron had filled him with renewed life. At thirty 
he was in bad health; at forty-six he was care worn 
and nearly all in. Now at fifty a miracle of vitality and 
his face beaming with the buoyancy of youth. Iron is 
absolutely necessary to enable your blood to change food 
into living tissue. "Without it, no matter how much or 
what you eat, your food merely passes through you with- 
out doing you any good. You don't get the strength out 
of it, and as a consequence you become weak, pale and 
sickly looking, just like a plant trying to grow in a soil 
deficient in iron. If you are not strong or well, you owe 
it to yourself to make the following test: See how long 
you can work or how far you can walk without becoming 
tired. Next take two five-grain tablets of ordinary nux- 
ated iron three times per day after meals for two weeks. 
Then test your strength again and see how much you have 
gained. I have seen dozens of nervous, run-down people 
who were ailing all the while double their strength and 
endurance and entirely rid themselves of all symptoms 
of dyspepsia, liver and other troubles in from ten to four- 
teen days' time simply by taking iron in the proper form. 
And this, after they had in some cases been doctoring 
for months without obtaining any benefit. But don't take 
the old forms of reduced iron, iron acetate, or tincture 
of iron simp?.y to save a few cents. The iron demanded 
by Mother Nature for the red coloring mattei in the blood 
of her children is, alas I not that kind of iron. You must 
take iron in a form that can be easily absorbed and as- 






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Bimilated to do you any good, otherwise it may prove 
worse than useless. Many an athlete and prize-fighter 
has won the day simply because he knew the secret of 
great strength and endurance and filled his blood with 
iron before he went into the affray; while many another 
has gone down in inglorious defeat simply for the lack 
of iron." 

Dr. Schuyler C. Jaques. another New York physician, 
said: "I have never before given out any medical in- 
formation or advice for publication, as I ordinarily do 
not believe in it But in the case of Nuxated Iron I 
feel I would be remiss in my duty not to mention it. I 
have taken it myself and given it to my patients with 
most surprising and satisfactory results. And those who 
wish quickly to increase their strength, power and en- 
durance will find it a most remarkable and wonderfully 
effective remedy." 

NOTE — Nuxated Iron, which is prescribed and recom- 
mended above by physicians in such a great variety of 
cases, is not a patent medicine nor secret remedy, but 
one which is well known to druggists and whose iron 
constituents are widely prescribed by eminent physicians 
both in Europe and America. Unlike the older inorganic 
iron products, it is easily assimilated, does not injure 
the teeth, make them black, nor upset the stomach ; on 
the contrary, it is a most potent remedy in nearly all 
forms of indigestion as well as for nervous, run-down 
conditions. The manufacturers have such great confidence 
in nuxated iron, that they offer to forfeit $100.00 to 
any charitable institution if they cannot take any man 
or woman imder 60 who lacks iron, and increase their 
strength 200 per cent or over in four weeks* time, provided 
they have no serious organic trouble. They also offer 
to refund your money if it does not at least double vour 
strength and endurance in ten days' time. It is dis- 
pensed by all good druggists. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE 3IAGAZIXK 



170 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



SEE THESE LWE SCENES IN SEVEN DEftDLYSINS 




McCLURE 
PICTURES 

present a series 
of seven five- 
r eel photo- 
plays,eac'i play 
exemplifying 
one o f the 
SEVEN DEAD- 
LY SINS. The 
first play, "En- 
vy", will be re- 
leased January 
8th. T„e other 
plays will im- 
mediately fol- 
low. 



THE 
STARS 

Ann Murdoch in 
"Envy"; Hot- 
brook BUnn in 
"Pride": Nance 
O- A'eitl in 
"Greed"; Char- 
lotte Walker in 
H. B. 
arnc r i n 
"Wrath''; 
Shirley Mason in j 
' ' Passion " and I 
George Le Guere , 
in The Sevevth ' 



EVE LESLIE IS BESET BY SEVEN DERDLY SINS 



EVE LESLIE is young, beautiful, ap- 
pealing. Wealth, luxury, social suc- 
cess — all of her heart's desires — are 
within her reach. But they have a price! 

Adam Moore is a young American with 
ideals. He is struggling to gain success — 
and the heart of Eve Leslie. 
Eve admires 



She does not know that Seven Deadly Sins 
wait to ensnare her. Evil men and women — 
who embody in their lives the Seven Deadly 
Sins — set themselves to defeat Adam and his 
friends. Eve Leslie's soul is the stake. 

Will Eve come out of the crucible un- 
scathed? Will her lover win her in the face 
of the insidious 



Adam and yet — 
other men offer her 
immediate wealth 
and social power. 
She is tempted to 
take the short 
and easy road 



Stars of all programs appear in McClure Pictures 






Jil i^i 1 m 



forces arrayed 
against him? 

Go to your 
favorite theatre 
and find out! 



Free! 

Shirley 



Ann Murdoch Holbrook BUnn Nance O'Neill Charlotte Walker H. B. Warner 

M^LURE PI^TUR 



Mason's 
Surprise 
Package! 

Write in margin your 
name and address and 
name and street of theatre 
in which you desire to see 
Seven Deadly Sins Tear off and 
mail to McClure Pictures, 261 41 
Ave., New York. A Surprise 
Package from (he youngest and 
prettiest siar of the films will be sent 
to you FREE. 



Released by SUPERPICTURES, Inc., N.Y. 
through the Triangle Exchanges 




THE WILLIAM G. HEWITT PRESS, G1-G7 NAVY 



.ST.. BROOKLYN, X. Y. 



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If You Can Tell aLachnitc 
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YES, we'll send you one of these exquisite man-made gems and you 
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Pay As You Wish 

Do not decide to buy a genuine Lach- 
nite Gem until you have worn it for 
10 full days. Then— if you wish— 
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TJTo -rrkl A onl y a * ew cents a day. Terms 

n-OTUlU ^V a* low as 3 l-3c a day- 

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12 N. Michigan Ave. ^^ Your credit is good. 
Dept. 1542 Chicago, I1L 

Gentlemen: Please send me 
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Name. 




Set Only in Solid Gold 

Lachnite Gems are mounted only in 

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Write for it today— it is free— no obligations. Send the coupon. 

Harold Lacbman Co.. 12 N. Michigan Ave.,Dept 1542 . Chkago.IlL 



Address 



I 



IOLET MERSEREAU 






HAVE YAU 

Seen 
SEVEN ^ 
DEADLY 



HERE IS the STORY 



EVE LESLIE, a girl whose beauty and inno- 
cence are her only possessions, is ambi- 
tious to win wealth, luxury, social success. 
Chance brings her to the great metropolis and pwts 
all of her ambitions within her reach. But the men and 
women who have the power to give Eve her heart's desires are 
the pawns of Seven Deadly Sins. They will give Eve what 
she wants — but her soul will be stained in the getting. 

Adam Moore, her lover, sees this. He 
follows her. He fights for her. But can he 
win? You will find the answer in your favorite 
theatre. 

Go to see Seven Deadly Sins — the motion- 
picture series that has aroused the eager in- 
terest of the entire country. 




SEVEN DEADLY SINS 

is a series of seven five-reel feature 
plays. Each play exemplifies one of 
the Seven Deadly Sins. Ask your 
theatre manager to book the series. 



DON'T MISS the FILMS 

Go to see winsome Ann Murdock portray 
the triumphs and dangers of a footlight career 
in the first play "Envy". 
Go to see Holbrook Blinn's wonderful acting in the next 
thrilling play "Pride". 

Go to see Shirley Mason, youngest and loveliest star of the 
films, in her portrayal of innocent love in "Passion". 
Go to see H. B. Warner's splendid work in "Wrath". 

Go to see Nance O'Neill's superb emotional 
acting in the money play, "Greed". 

Go to see Charlotte Walker in her role 
of "Molly Pitcher" in the patriotic picture 
"Sloth". 

Go to see versatile George Le Guere in the 
mysterious Seventh Sin. 



M^LURE PICTURES 

Go to See Seven Deadly Sins 






dceJre 10 aee Seven Deadly Sbu. 
Tur off and mall to Motion Plena 
Bailor. The Ladles - World, 251 4th 
Aw.. New York. 






Package 

tMaro7»h< 




MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



H!1IIIIIBIIBIIIII* 



HI 



,ct°i^ 



HIS MASTERS VOICE' 



'of 1 



Caruso 

is Jihact<ema 
in Aids 



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■*§■■■■ 






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Masterpieces of opera 

by the 
worlds oreatest artists 

The mere mention of opera suggests 
Caruso, Alda, Braslau, Calve, Destinn, 
Farrar, Gadski, Galli-Curci, Garrison, 
Gluck, Hempel, Homer, Journet, Mar- 
tinelli, McCormack, Melba, Ruffo, 
Schumann-Heink, Scotti, Sembrich, 
Tetrazzini, Whitehill — the commanding 
personalities who dominate the operatic 
stage. 

These renowned artists in full reali- 
zation and acknowledgment that the 
Victor alone reproduces their art with 
absolute fidelity, make records for the 
Victor exclusively. 

Any Victor dealer will gladly play any music you 
wish to hear, and give you a copy of the Victor 
Record catalog— the most complete catalog of music 
in all the world. 

Victor Talking Machine Co. 
Camden, N. J., U. S. A. 

Berliner Gramophone Co., Montreal, Canadian Distributors 

Important Notice. All Victor Talking Ma' 
chines are patented .and are only lie ensed, and with 
right of use with Victor Records only. All Victor 
Records are patented and are only licensed, and with 
right of use on Victor Talking Machines only. Victor 
Records and Victor Machines are scientifically co* 
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of manufacture; and their use, except with each 
other, is not only unauthorized, but damaging and 
unsatisfactory. 



ctor 



IIIIIIIHISSS1E! 



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| Become a Players' Portrait | 

| Collector 

| We Will Start You Off With 

| A Splendid Set of 80 Portraits 

If To those interested in Motion Pictures there is a no more interesting | 

W diversion for the long winter evenings than the collecting and mounting j 

| of players' portraits. | 

1| Thousands of readers of the Motion Picture Magazine are now enthusi- 

m astic portrait collectors, and their rooms and dens are decorated with hun- 

g dreds of players' portraits, framed, passe-partouted or mounted in ingenious i 

1| designs on cardboard to meet the various tastes of their owners. I 

If Many of these portraits are cut from the Motion Picture Magazine, but 

JH .. ■ • this practice spoils the magazine for future use. | 

J To meet the constantly increasing demand we are now offering FREE 1 

§j with a year's subscription to either the Magazine or Classic a set of 80 | 

§1" — 4J4-x8j5 unmounted rotogravure portraits. Those who have already received 1 

^. these portraits wonder how we can afford to give so many beautiful portraits 1 

M _. free with the magazine at the small price of a year's subscription. The secret | 

H§ is, buying in large quantities at a large reduction in price. § 

U This set of portraits will prove a valuable addition to those you already | 

jj have or give you a good start on a new collection. | 

jj All that you have to do is to fill out coupon below and mail with regular | 

|H year's subscription price for the Magazine or Classic. | 

§§ The; portraits carefully packed will be mailed you promptly. | 

jj Why not send your order today? | 

H Jackie Saunders Fannie Ward Lillian Glsh Ethel Clayton 1 

= Virginia Pearson Cleo Ridgely Mabel Normand Carlyle Blackwell I 

== Kathlyn Williams Marie Doro Dorothy Glsh Mollie King I 

ss King Baggot Vivian Martin Bessie Barriscale Muriel Ostriche 

= Henry B. Walthall Dustln Farnum Norma Tal mad ge Jane Grey I 

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= Beatriz Michelena Lenore Ulrich Mae Busch Marguerite Caurtot i 

§= Earle Williams Edna Goodrich William S. Hart Ruth Roland | 

==3 Frank Morgan Mary Pickford Louise Glaum Annette Kellermann 

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s Charles Richman Bessie Eyton Harold Lockwood Kitty Gordon 1 

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^ Alice Joyce Edna Mayo Valli Valli Blanche Sweet 

HI Peggy Hyland Helen Holmes Mrs. Sidney Drew Anita King e 

HI Alice Brady Clara Kimball Young Sidney Drew Wallace Reid | 

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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




ewa 



Iked 



witik Kings £. 



HE could not know, standing there in his bare 
feet and his rough clothes, with his little 
schooling, that kings would do him honor 
when he died, and that all men who read would 
mourn a friend. 

He could not dream that one day his work would 
stand in Chinese, in Russian, in many languages he 
could not read — and from humble doorman to 
proudest emperor, all would be gladdened at his 
coming. 

He could not know that through it all he would 
remain as simple, as democratic, as he was that 
day as a boy on the Mississippi. 



MARK TWAIN 



He made us laugh, so that we had no 
time to see that his style was sublime, 
that he was biblical in simplicity, that 
he was to America another Lincoln in 
spirit. 

To us, he was just Mark Twain — well- 
beloved, one of ourselves, one to laugh 
with, one to go to for cheer, one to go to 
for sane, pointed views. Now he is gone, 
the trenchant pen is still. But his joy- 
ous spirit is still with us. Mark Twain's 
smile will live forever. His laughter is 
eternal. 

The road ahead of that boy on the river 
bank was a hard one. Before "Mark 
Twain," a distinguished, 
white-haired man, and the 
King of England walked and 
talked together, his path was 
set with trouble. It was a 
truly American story — a small 
beginning — little schooling — 
good humor— and final, shin- 
ing, astounding success. 



25 VOLUMES 

Novels Essays 

Short Stories 

Travel Humor 

History 



Send Coupon 



When it is gone, there will never again 



Before the war we had a contract price for paper. But now the price of paper has 
gone up. It has almost doubled in price. Even the price of ink has gone up. So it 
is impossible to make any more sets and to sell them at the present low price. 

The last of the half-price edition is in sight 
be a set of Mark Twain at the present price. 

Remember that it is because Mark Twain sacrificed some of his royalties that you 
can have a set at this price at all. Take advantage of that kindness that was so char- 
acteristic of him. 

Get your set before these go. Remember, never again will a set of Mark / 

I wain be offered at such a price as this. When this edition is gone there will / 

be no more. Send the coupon herewith at once. J Name 

HARPER & BROTHERS, 1817-1917, NEW YORK/L__ 




Because he was of high and 
brave intellect, because he had 
humor as deep and as true as 
the human heart, and because 
he had struggled with life, he was a great 
man. So his works are great. 



r The Great American 

He was American. He had the ideal- 
ism of America — the humor, the kindli- 
ness, the reaching toward a bigger thing, 
the simplicity. In his work we find all 
things, from the ridiculous in "Huckle- 
berry Finn" to the sublime of 
"Joan of Arc," — serene and 
lovely beauty as lofty as Joan 
herself. A man who could 
write two such books as 
"Huckleberry Finn" and 
"Joan of Arc" was sublime in 
power. His youth and his 
laughter are eternal; his 
genius will never die. 



Before the Half- 
Price Sale Stops 



12 
your 



Harper & 
Brothers, 
Franklin Sq., 
New York 

Send me. all 
charges prepaid, a 
set of Mark Twain's 
works in 25 volumes, il- 
lusrtated, bound in hand- 
some gTeen cloth, stamped 
T /' in gold, gold tops and deckled 
edges. If not satisfactory, I will 
return them at your expense, 
erwise 1 will send you $1.00 
thin 5 days and J2.00 a month for 
months, thus getting the benefit of 
half-price sale. Motion Picture 3-17 



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FOR SALE 

FOR RENT OR SALE— A building with three outlets 
on Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa., which building can 
be easily converted into moving picture and vaudeville 
house, or either. For further particulars apply to 
Maurice G. Weinberg, 693 Drexel Bldg., Phila., Pa. 



NEWS CORRESPONDENTS 



EARN $25 WEEKLY, spare time, writing for news- 
papers, magazines. Experience unnecessary; details 
free. Press Syndicate, 457 St. Louis, Mo. 



REAL ESTATE 



Mississippi 
IS HE CRAZY? The owner of a plantation in Mis- 
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only condition is that figs be planted. The owner 
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your trees for $6 per month. Your profit should bo 
$1,000 per year. Some think this man is crazy for 
giving away such valuable land, but there may be 
method in his madness. 



MALE HELP WANTED 



THE WAY TO GET A GOY'T JOB is through the 
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GOVERNMENT POSITIONS PAY BIG MONEY. 

Examinations everywhere soon. Get prepared by former United 
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LEARN TO BE A DETECTIVE — Travel over the world; 
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TRAINED ADVERTISING MEN DEMAND AND GET 

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can train you; greater openings daily. Art Prospectus 
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Powell, 80 Temple Court, New York. 

THOUSANDS MEN— WOMEN WANTED. $100 month 
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Institute, Dept. T-119. Rochester, N. Y. 

FEMALE HELP WANTED 

FIVE BRIGHT, CAPABLE LADIES to travel, demon- 
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road fare paid. Goodrich Drug Company, Dept. 60, 
Omaha, Neb. ____^___ 

LADIES TO SEW at home for a large Phila. firm; good 
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velope for prices naid. UNIVERSAL CO., Dept. 45, 
Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



HELP WANTED 



WANTED — MEN AND WOMEN, 18 or over, every- 
where, for U. S. Government Life Jobs. Thousands 
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MAN OR WOMAN TO TRAVEL FOR OLD-ESTAB- 
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T. G. Nichols, Philadelphia, Pa., Pepper Bldg. 



POULTRY 



POULTRY PAPER, 44-124 page periodical, up to date, 
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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



J5he OPPORTUNITY MARKET 



PATENTS 


MOVING PICTURE BUSINESS 


Patents Secured or Fee Returned. Actual search free. 
Send sketch. 1916 Edition 90-page patent book free. 
My free sales service gets full value. George P. 
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starts you. No experience needed. Our machines are 
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WANTED IDEAS — Write for List of Inventions Wanted 




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Victor J. Evans & Co.. 833 Ninth. Washington. D. C. 


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PHOTOPLAYS 


through our Credit System. Waters & Co., Succeeded 
by Talbert & Parker, 4100 Warder Bldg., Washington, 
D. C. 


Send Me Your Idea for a Photoplay. Submit in any 
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See Here! We want your ideas for Photoplays and 
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big prices. Get details now. Manuscript Sales Co., 
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PATENTS THAT PROTECT AND PAY. Books and 
advice Free. Highest references. Best results. Prompt- 
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Washington, D. C. 

IDEAS WANTED — Manufacturers are writing for 
patents procured through me. Three books with list 


hundreds of inventions wanted sent free. I help you 
market your invention. Advice Free. R. B. OWEN, 
121 Owen Bldg., Washington, D. C. 


Wanted — Your ideas for Photoplays. Stories, Etc.! We 
will accept them in any form — correct full — sell on 
Commission. Big Rewards! Make money. Get full 
details now! Writer's Selling Service, 2 Main, Auburn, 
N. Y. 


COINS, STAMPS, ETC. 


$$— OLD COINS WANTED— $$—$4.25 each paid for 
U. S. Flying Eagle Cents dated 1856. $2 to $600 paid 
for hundreds of old coins dated before 1895. Send TEN 


Scenarios, Manuscripts Typed, 10 Cents Page. In- 
cluding carbon. Marjorie Homer Jones, 322 Monad- 
nock Block, Chicago. 


cents at once for New Illustrated Coin Value Book, 
4x7. Get posted — it may mean your good fortune. 
C. F. CLARKE & CO., Coin Dealers, Box 99, Le Roy, N.Y. 


WRITE FOR FREE CATALOG 

of best books on writing and selling photoplays, short 
stories, poems. 


NEW 1917 COIN PREMIUM BOOK, 10c (silver). 


Atlas Publishing Co., 895, Cincinnati. 


Save all coins before 1910, it may mean your fortune — ■ 
watch your change; many in circulation. E. C. Harr, 
Nora Springs, la. 

Will Pay $2.00 for 1904 Dollar, proof; 10c for 1912 
nickels, S. Mint; $100\00 for dime, 1894, S. Mint. We 
want thousands coins and stamps. We offer up to 
$1,000 for certain dates. Send 4c for large illust. Coin 
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WRITE PHOTOPLAYS in SPARE TIME AND EARN 
MONEY. Try It. Big Prices Paid; Constant Demand; 
No Correspondence Course; Details Free. Giese Co., 
291 Whiteman St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 


Thorough Submission Brings Results. We send dupli- 
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once. Send us your photoplays. No expense unless deal 
made. National Photoplay Sales Co., Box 422, Des 


GAMES AND ENTERTAINMENTS 


i Moines, la. 


PLAYS, Vaudeville Sketches, Monologues, Dialogues, 
Speakers, Minstrel Material, Jokes, Recitations, Tab- 
leaux, Drills, Entertainments. Make Up Goods. Large 
Catalog Free. T. S. Denison & Co., Dept. 62, Chicago. 


PHOTOPLAY TEXT BOOKS 


How to Write a Photoplay, by C. G. Winkopp, 1342 
Prospect Ave., Bronx, N. Y. C. Price, 25 cents. Con- 
tains model scenario, "Where to Sell," "How to Bu:Id 


MISCELLANEOUS 


Plots," "Where to Get Plots." 


"Scenario Technic," 10c. coin. SHOWS you how to put 
your plot in scenario form. Original 50-scene photo- 
play, writing and selling instructions, list of buyers. 
Doty Co., Bliss Bldg., R. 55, Washington, D. C. 


Fourth Edition of "The Hair," its anatomy, diseases 
and treatment (EMMS), by Dr. Achershaug (Norway). 
SWORN AFFIDAVITS and physicians' endorsements. 
Copy free for postage (8c.) Achershaug, 246-M Man- 


hattan Ave., New York City. 

JOIN THE UNIVERSAL EXCHANGE LEAGUE and 


STORIES WANTED 


get letters, cards, photos from photoplay lovers and 
others everywhere. Membership, your name listed, 
Big List, etc., 10 cents. Cha's. Al. Seifert, Sec'y, 
Hill P. O., Harrisburg, Pa. 


WANTED — Stories, articles, poems for new magazine. 
We pay on acceptance. Hand-written MSS. acceptable. 
Submit MSS. to Cosmos Magazine, 1070 Stewart Bldg., 
Washington, D. C. 


TYPEWRITERS 


SONGWRITERS 


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for B. & O. JAS. E. CLARE, INC., Schank St., bet. 
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are we can best serve, you. Write and see — now. 
Young Typewriter Company. Dept. 1078, Chicago. 


FOR THE LAME 


Send for List No. 1 of Typewriter Bargains — new and 
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AMERICAN TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE, 14 North 
Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 


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Write for booklet. HENRY O. LOTZ, 2V3 Third Ave., New York. 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 





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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



PHOTOPLAY REVIEWS 

"Redeeming Love" (Morosco). — Kath- 
lyn Williams, more charmingly seductive 
than ever, makes her debut under a new 
banner amidst extraordinarily lavish set- 
tings. The drama itself is of the red- 
blooded variety. Two men, the one a too 
narrow-minded preacher, the other a too 
broad-minded gambler, fight for the soul 
and body of a young girl. It is not at all 
surprising that the gambler, typifying sen- 
suous gaiety, should win temporarily, but 
the way that love wins the girl back to the 
virtuous path is so filled with exciting inci- 
dents as to constitute a thriller. Wyndham 
Standing is indeed clever in his portrayal 
of the gambler, but Thomas Holding, as 
the preacher, is a trifle too prone to gaze 
heavenward and to fold his hands prayer- 
fully. H. S. N. 

"The Breaker" (Essanay). — Pre-emi- 
nently a character sketch with just enough 
plot action to keep it going. Here is Bry- 
ant Washburn as an easy-going failure, in 
clothes too large for him, and Nell Craig 
endeavoring to make a living as a stenog- 
rapher in the same boarding-house. The 
acting is above par, but it seems to me the 
story lacks virility. All in all, however, a 
good, clean picture of everyday life. 

H. S. N. 

"Whom the Gods Destroy" (Vitagraph). 
— A story set in Ireland during the recent 
rebellion. The climax is one which makes 
us proud of*, our fellow human beings. 
Three splendid characters, a woman and 
two men, attempt to save each other from 
disgrace at no matter how great an ex- 
pense to self. Harry Morey is the com- 
manding figure of the play, with Marc 
MacDermott a close second. I confess to 
watching all thru the picture for the elu- 
sively rare smile of Miss Alice Joyce, who, 
wraith-like in her slenderness, seemed to 
personify a tragic muse of a girl who car- 
ried all her country's burdens on her slim 
shoulders. A heroic play, well done in 
every particular. H. S. N. 

"The Black Butterfly" (Metro).— Be- 
cause every man who helps her along her 
pathway demands his pay in caresses, and 
because she thinks one man in particular 
has betrayed her, "The Black Butterfly" 
becomes a vampire de luxe. But mother- 
love and love of country can make a hero- 
ine of the blackest vampire, and every- 



You M«xy Now Us 

this valuable art. Others are using Lichtentag Paragon as a daily 
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Because of its remarkable simplicity you can learn the entire 

LICHTENTAG PARAGON 




ihhkii 



in your own home, during the 
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Write for full 

proof. 




7i 



DAYS 



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Photoplays— Stories — Poems 

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our BARGAIN TYPEWRITER OFFER to authors. 
Atlas Publishing: Co., 995, Cincinnati, O. _^____ 



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When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



10 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




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LASHNHTEN the Original — Accept no substitute. 
LASHNEEN COMPANY (Dept. 1), PHILADELPHIA 



BECOME A SUCCESSFUL 
PHOTQPLAYWRIGHT 

Tt is nine-tenths a matter of Knowing Whkrk to Get 
Plots and after that a Knowledge of Dramatic 
Construction. These two prime requisites are now 
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Tells What Plots Are— Where to Get All the Plots 
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Any Material Dramatic— How to Get the Punch Every Time. Also 
A SPECIMEN PHOTOPLAY and a Revised GLOSSARY, Used in 
Schools, Colleges and Libraries thruout the United States*. Indorsed 
by ALL AUTHORITIES. 




THE PHOTODRAMA He „r y «£• mm* 

Member of Edison Staff; Associate Editor Motion Picture 
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224 Pages— Cloth Bound— Stamped in Gold. Postpaid $2 10 



By the same author: "The Plot of the Story," 
tion," "The Plot Catalog." All valuable to the 
each. Any one with "The Photodrama." $3.10. 
All four books, $5.00. 



Photoplay wright. $1.20 
Two with same. $4.00. 



The Caldron Publishing Company, 173 Duf field St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 




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thing ends beautifully good. Here is a 
strong story from the pen of L. Case Rus- 
sell which needs no padding. Excellent 
settings, and Olga Petrova is exceptionally 
beautiful and capable in the title role. 

H. S. N. 

"The Sunbeam" ( Rolf e-Metro).— An- 
other poor little girl bringing light to this 
old world. This time it is Mabel Talia- 
ferro w r ho does the good work. Splendid 
direction and careful attention to detail 
make this an interesting entertainment. 

H. S. N. 

"The War Bride's Secret" (Fox). — It 
seems obvious that the author himself was 
in doubt as to just how to end his photo- 
play. At all events it drags deplorably 
and is too unhappy thematically. Virginia 
Pearson does some wonderful work, and, 
the environment, that of old Scotland, is 
well carried out. H. S. N. 

"And the Law Says" (American). — A 
plea against capital punishment, with 
Richard Bennett in the leading role. Too 
many long subtitles which the pictures 
merely illustrate, but with a worth-while 
motive for its existence. H. S. N. 

"Captain Jinks Should Worry" (Vita- 
graph). — A Frank Daniels comedy, re- 
freshinglv novel in theme and humor. 

H. S. X. 

"Life's Shadows" (Metro).- — Here is 
plot incident piled upon plot incident, all 
very interesting and exciting. Some splen- 
did characterizations and Irene Hawley ast 
heroine make a strong photoplav. 

H. S. N. 

"The Foolish Virgin" (C, K. Y.-Selz- 
nick). — One of the best plays Clara Kini- 
ball Young has appeared in for some 
time. The first three acts are tense and 
absorbing, but there seems to be a lagging, 
halting lameness about the last reels. All 
in all, however, the picture is good. Direc- 
tion and locations excellent. R. B. C. 

"The Innocence of Lizette" (American). 
— Mary Miles Minter as an innocent little 
girl who, finding a baby, immediately 
claims it as her own, and, when about to 
lose it for want of a masculine parent, 
promptly claims a strange young man as 
its father. The complications can be 
easily imagined. A pretty, tho not highly 
dramatic play. Direction very good, for 
which James Kirkwood is responsible. 

R. B. C. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



11 



''The Slave Market" (Famous Players). 
— Here is a tale of pirates bold, of Spanish 
gallants, and lovely ladies ; of treasure- 
laden galleons and murderous "Long John 
Silvers." Pauline Frederick is the star, 
ably supported by Thomas Meighan. The 
story is melodramatic, but interesting, and 
the locations have been chosen with an eye 
for beauty. R. B. C. 

"The Girl Philippa" (Vitagraph).— A 
long-awaited screening of one of Robert 
W. Chambers' most popular novels. Anita 
Stewart, as the Girl, is very lovely, and, 
she is supported by A. Rankin Drew. The 
settings are very good, but the photogra- 
phy is only fair. At the time the writer 
viewed the picture, it was badly cut, caus- 
ing jerky action, etc. It is to be hoped 
that the picture will be released in its 
original length of six reels, instead of four 
and a half. I am given to understand 
this will be done, and that many fine scenes 
now cut will be reincorporated. 

R. B. C. 

"Snow White" (Famous Players). — 
Like a breath of springtime comes Mar- 
guerite Clark's latest picture. She has 
duplicated her wonderful success in the 
stage-play of this name by picjurizing it. 
She looks not more than ten or twelve 
years old thruout. A play that kiddies 
will love and grown-ups enjoy. Creighton 
Hale plays the Prince, with George Odell 
as the strutting, primping Sir Dandiprat 
Bombas. An excellent supporting cast. 

R. B. C. 

"The Americano" (Ince-Triangle). — 
The fact that Douglas Fairbanks is the 
star of this is sufficient proof that it's 
good. As the extremely susceptible, quick- 
tempered son of the Stars and Stripes, in 
Mexico, "Electricity Doug" does the 
best work of his picture career. It is 
a mad, merry scramble of lovely seiioritas, 
tempest-in-tea-pot revolutions, kidnapped, 
Presidentes, and a strong, husky son of 
the U. S. A. to wave the Stars and Stripes, 
as the curtain goes down on the last and 
a happy finale. Alma Reubens is a lovely 
and extremely capable "opposite" to Mr. 
Fairbanks. R. B. C. 

"A Bit of Wire" (Vitagraph).— The 
first of a new series, "The Dangers of 
Doris," featuring Alary Anderson. The 
first episode is only passable — altho Mary 
does a very clever "stunt" which provides 



451 



Short 
Stories 

Long 
2 Stories 

f uuS tratea. or . eS . 
c0 ^fnovel. 

r.pUNG 

lV» r " 179 sto- 
r volumes * . one 



Finish This Story 
For Yourself— 

The girl got $6 a week 
and was lonely. ''Piggy" — 
you can imagine his kinu — was 
waiting downstairs. He knew 
where champagne and music 
. could behad. But that 
»«|| night she didn't go. 
yThat was Lord 
Kitchener's doing. 
But another night ? 

0. HENRY 

12 Volumes 

tells about it in this 

story, with that full knowl- 
edge of women, with that 
frank facing of sex, and that 
clean mind that has en- 
deared him to the men and 
women of the land. From the 
few who snapped up the first 
edition at $125 a set before it 
was off the press, to the 
1-20,000 who have eagerly 
sought the beautiful volumes 
offered you here — from the 
professional man who sits 
among his books tothemanon 
the street and to the woman in 
every walk of life — the whole 
nation bowstoO. Henry — and 
hails him with love and pride 
as our greatest writerof stories. 

This is but one of the 274 stories, in 12 
big volumes, you get for 37 \% cents a 
wsek, if you send the coupon. 

To Those Who Are Quick 

KIPLING 

6 Volumes. Given Away 

Never was there an off* 
N>t only do 



like this. 

tO.Hemj 
stories in 12 volumes at les- than 
others paid for one volume of the 
first edition, lint you get Kipling's 
best 179 short stories and poems and 
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We will ship the complete sets so that you can loolc 
them over in your home and then decide whether 
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with (). Henry and the free Kipling notify us and 
we will take the sets back as cheerfully as we seni 
them. How could any proposition be more fair': 



INSPECTION COUPON 



THE RIVERSIDE PUBLISHING CO. 3 

Marquette Building, Chicago, III. 17 

Please ship me on approval the Works of O. Henry, 
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If I keep the books I will pay you $1.00 as Brat 
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$-.00 per month until your special price of $25.00 for 
;he O. Henry set only is paid, and it is agreed I 
am to retain the Kipling set without charge. If not 
satisfactory I "ill notify you within 1" days and 
return both sets as soon as you give me shipping 
instructions as offered readers of Motion Picture 
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the necessary thrill. One's imagination 
must be brought into play in order to be 
convinced, in this story. R. B. C. 

"The Mischief-Maker" (Fox). — A some- 
what silly, childish affair — the conven- 
tional headstrong, heedless hoyden who is 
sent to boarding-school to be reformed. 
We go thru the old-time "midnight 
spreads/' "tricks on teachers," solitary 
confinement rigamarole. There are some 
bright spots, however. June Caprice 
romps prettily thru the name-part, while 
the boyish good-looks of Harry Benham 
help him to make love to her agreeably. 

R. B. C. 

"The Silk Industry of Japan" (Pathe). 
— -A very beautifully colored film of this 
all-important, tho little-known industry, 
from the time of the selection of cocoons, 
for breeding purposes in far-away Japan, 
to the wearing of silken gowns by Milady 
of America. One of the most interesting 
educationals from this company. 

*R. B. C. 

"Balloonatics" (L-Ko). — Alice Howell 
in two side-splitting reels of slapstick. 
No matter how "high-brow" you may be, 
you'll have to laugh at Alice's unique 
method of scrubbing the floor. R. B. C. 

"Some Baby!" (Christie). — The best 
thing about this rather clever little comedy 
is the youth, good-looks and ability of the 
two stars — Betty Compson and Neal 
Burns — not to mention the year-old player 
of the title role. R. B. C. 

"The Battle of Life" (Fox).— Gladys 
Coburn's debut as a Fox star under the 
direction of James Vincent. A somewhat 
out of the ordinary story of the slums and 
a girl's brave fight for better things. Art 
Acord is very good as the girl's lover. 

R. B. C. 

"The Traveling Salesman" (Famous 
Players). — A most enjoyable screening of 
a famous stage-play, with the player who 
created the title role on Broadway in the 
same part. Frank Mclntyre registers 
well and should be a good drawing card. 
Doris Kenyon is very sweet and pretty 
as the Girl. R. B. C. 

"The Sunbeam" (Metro).— Mabel Tal- 
iaferro in a "good little girl" part. As 
Prue, the "angel of the slums," Miss 
Taliaferro does some very good work. The 
scenes in the candy factory are particu- 
larly good. Raymond McKee, as Prue's 



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boy-lover, who steals to buy a "birth-day 
party" for "Grammy" and who, thru 
Prue's love, gives himself up to justice, to 
expiate his crime, is excellent. It's a play 
that, while it presents no big problem, 
leaves you with a "nice, kind" feeling in 
the region of your heart. R. B. C. 

"Great Expectations" (Famous Play- 
ers). — One of the best five-reel plays of 
the year. Only in length is it inferior to 
"Intolerance" and "Joan the Woman." 
The continuity is perfect, the direction 
splendid, costumes, locations, and so forth, 
quite up to the standard which its director, 
Robert G. Vignola, has set for himself and 
his company. The story is taken entirely 
from the book; no liberties are taken with 
the original story as Mr. Dickens wrote 
it, even the titles being used from the book. 
A novel idea is brought in — the story is 
told thruout in the first person. We see 
the story thru "Pip's" eyes, never seeing, 
or knowing, any more than he does. Jack 
Pickford is his usual boyish, likable self 
in the role of Pip, and Louise Huff is, 
quite as charming as Estella as you would 
expect her to be. A thoroly enjoyable 
story. * R. B.'C. 

"Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the 
Sea" (Universal). — A novel photodrama- 
tic version of Jules Verne's book of the 
same title, combined with "The Mysterious 
Island." A picture made possible by the 
inventions of the Williamson Brothers, 
thru which the scenes at the bottom of the 
sea are taken. A spectacular, gripping 
eight-reel production that will entertain. 
Jane Gail, Allen Holubar and Matt Moore 
are the leads, and acquit themselves well. 

R. B. C. 

"The Pride of the Clan" (Artcraft).— 
Mary Pickford's second release. This 
story of a Scotch lassie who ruled her 
clan "as father would want his ain bairn" 
to do, is a very sweet, smooth-running 
little story. Not overburdened with plot, 
perhaps — but who wants a plot in a Mary 
Pickford story? The production is an 
artistic one, the locations are very good, 
and the close of the picture, showing the 
sinking of the old boat, and the rescue 
of Marget (Mary Pickford) by her 
lover, Jamie (Matt Moore) is splendidly 
handled. R. B. C, 

{Continued on page 15) 



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{Continued from page 13) 

"Panthea" (Norma Talmadge-Selz- 
nick). — Xorma's very first picture "on 
her own." Direction by Allan Dwan, 
which assures you that it was good. There 
are weak moments in the play, there are 
times when it verges closely on the cheaply 
melodramatic, but the winsome, dark-eyed 
charm of Xorma Talmadge, the boyish, 
virile good-looks of Earle Foxe, as the 
hero, make up for that. Rogers Lytton 
contributed a fine piece of work as the vil- 
lain, and Jack Meredith gives us a warmly 
human portrait of Serge, Panthea's school- 
boy lover. R. B. C. 

"Joan the Woman" (Lasky-Cardinal). 
One feels rather helpless in attempting to 
review such a massive spectacle as this — 
the most ambitious picture that has been 
shown on Broadway this season, and for 
many others. Jeanie McPherson wrote 
the script, and to her must, necessarily, 
go a good -bit of the credit, for she has 
given us a gripping, absorbing scenario, 
thoroly consistent in every respect. Cecil 
B. DeMille directed it,, which is further 
proof of its excellence. Geraldine Farrar 
as Joan is a wonderful and impressive 
figure always. She gives us a new and 
sympathetic picture of Joan. Hitherto, 
Joan of Arc has been looked upon as a 
woman who gave up merely her life for 
the sake of her country. Joan the Woman 
gives up that which is dearer to many 
women — her love ! She sacrifices all on 
the altar of her country — and her reward 
is martyrdom. Too much cannot be said 
in praise of the production. The photog- 
raphy is magnificent — the locations could 
not be improved upon — the battle-scenes 
have the strength and fire of "Intolerance" 
— the long list of principals in support of 
the star — all is excellent, magnificently 
done. The cast is much too long to give 
here. Suffice it to say that Theodore 
Roberts should stand next to the star 
in point of excellence of acting — his 
"Cauchon the Terrible" is a character to 
remember. Tully Marshall is great as the 
mad monk, Wallace Reid's Eric Trent 
is almost as good as his Don Juan, and 
Raymond Hatton gives a splendid piece 
of work as the bigoted, childish, yet some- 
how pathetic king. There may be — doubt- 

(Continued on page 154) 




"A Train Load of Books." What 
Clarkson is Doing for the Book Buyer 



In several hundred thousand Libraries 
Ln the homes of people in every walk of 
life — from the day laborer to the college 
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Sets artistically printed and bound almost 
every book was bought from me. WHY? 
Because. I have no agents and sell you just 
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at my expense — and— owe me nothing. 
Sample Pi-ices: 
When a Man's a Man. Publisher's 

price, $1.35. My price, 90c. 
Eyes of the World. My price, 39c. 
Famous Pictures. $6.00--$1.45. 
Encyclopedia of Quotations. Pub. 

price, $2.50. My price, 89c. 
What All Married People Should 

Know. $3.00-73c. 
Famous Orators, $2.50— 95c. 
Law Without Lawyers. Pub. price, 

$2.00. My price, 45c. 
Shakespeare, 24 vols., 24mo. Leath- 
er, $2.65. 
When a Man Comes to Himself— 
Woodrow Wilson. 50c. 

Here are Pe Luxe Sets, Morocco bound, complete works, many 
of them at less than 25 cents on the dollar. Hugo, Kipling. 
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Get My Big, New Catalog 

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I sell more books direct to the booklover— the individual reader 
— the rich man who insists upon his dollar's worth — the man 
who watches his pennies — and sell them for less money — than 
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David B. Clarkson, The Bock Broker 

383 Clarkson Building Chicago, Illinois 



Key to the Bible. $3.75-98c. 
Library of Wit& Humor, $1.50-52c. 
Huckleberry Finn and Other Mark 

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Brann: The Iconoclast. 2 vols. $2.25. 
History of the World, 3 vols. Pub. 

price, $12.00. My price, $2.95. 
Memory: How to Develop, 85c. 
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price, $5.50. My price. $1.50. 
New Americanized Encyclopedia, 15 

vols., 3-4 Leather. Pub. price, 

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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia. 

12 vols., 3-4 Leather. Pub. price, 

$120.00. My price, $39.50. 



siiiiM 

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M THE M. P. PUBLISHING CO. wants |§ 

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When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 




Vol. XIII 



FEB -2 1917 



March, 1917 



Content 



No. 2 



March 




MOTION PICTUDE 
■ MAGAZINE ■ 



PAGE 

. Leo Sielke, Jr. 

. "Junius" et al. 9 

Jack Gallagher 18 

19-33 

Thuryle Kretzer 34 

of Roscoe Arbuckle, 

. Roberta Courtlandt 



Cover Design. Painting of Violet Mersereau 

Photoplay Reviews. Critical comments on current cinemas . 

Chawlie Chaplin, Capering Cupid. Valentine drawing in colors 

Art Gallery of Fifteen Popular Players .... 

The Movie Queen of Hearts ! Drawing and verse _ . 

With the Movie Folks at Home and Abroad. Intimate "close-ups 

Tom Forman, Dustin Farnum, Henry Walthall and others 
Falling — On and Off the Screen. How Chaplin, Murdock, Turpin and others do so much 

tumbling without getting hurt ........ Robert Francis Moore 

What Their Handwriting Portrays. How the characters of Hart, Mersereau, Sweet, 

Walthall and Garwood are revealed by the way they move their pens . Fritzi Remont 

The Glory of Yolanda. A short story from the Vitagraph film, featuring Anita Stewart, 

Dorothy Donnell 
Have You Tried "Dancing With Folly"? Marguerite Clayton and Edward Arnold in a 

striking dance pose Vol Francois 

The Lannigans and Brannigans. Mr. Gable's famous Irish characters are back again and 

they are funnier than ever . James G. Gable 

Our Versatile Comedians. Film comedy of every trade and profession is exemplified by 

Ham and Bud, the popular Kalem comedians . . . . Stanley V. Todd 

Acting on the Street. An entertaining article showing many amusing incidents that occur 

when Moving Pictures are taken on the street ..... Arthur Hdrnbhw, Jr. 

Marguerite Clark in "Snow White." Photo ,. * . 

The Boy Who Couldn't Keep a Job. An evening's chat with the successful failure — 

Edward Earle . . . . _ . Peter Wade 

Stories That Are True. Interesting tales by the players, including Dustin Farnum, 

Cleo Madison, Mary Fuller and Blanche Sweet . . . . ' . . ' . 

A Day in an Animated Cartoon Factory. Cartoon . . . . . . Wm. C. Nolan 

A Girl Like That. A short story from the Famous Players film, featuring Irene Fenwick 

and Owen Moore . . . . . . . . . . Edwin M. La Roche 

My Lady of the Dimples. Lillian Walker wanted to play serious roles, but her dimples said nay . 
The Photodrama. A department for photoplay writers . . . Henry Albert Phillips 



Breaking Into the Movies in California. A diary, continued . 

A Child of Fortune. A chat with Mae Murray . . . . . 

On Location with Harold Lockwood and May Allison . . . 
Virginia Pearson in "The Bride's Secret." Photo .... 

How Helen Holmes Became Mrs. Mack and a Picture Star 
The Devil's Pay Day. A short story written from the Bluebird film, featu 
and Franklyn Farnum . . ... 

Paper Cut-Outs of Popular Players. Pearl White . . 

Limericks. A contest in which our readers compete for cash prizes 
Max Linder Comes Back and Talks Entertainingly of His 'Return 
Our Cover Girl — Violet Mersereau . . . . . . 

Greenroom Jottings. Little whisperings from" everywhere in playerdom 
Answers to Inquiries. By the first and greatest of all walking encyclopaedias 
Guide to the Theaters. Stage plays in New York that are worth while 
Patter from the Pacific . . . . .. . . 

The Answer Lady Questions answered "from the inside" . 



Susette Booth 
Johnson Briscoe 
Bennie Zeidman 



35 

39 

43 

48 

58 

59 

61 

65 
71 

72 

75 
80 

81 
90 
91 
93 
95 
98 
101 
102 



. Pearl Gaddis 
ing Leah Baird 

. Gladys Hall 107 

John Argens 115 

. . .116 

Clement F. Chandler 

Carol Lee 



The Answer Man 

. "Junius" 

Dick Melbourne 

Rose Tapley 



120 
123 
124 

127 
154 
157 
164 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 

(Trade-mark Registered.) Entered at the Brooklyn, N. V., Post Otfce as second-class matter. 

Eugene V. Brewster, Managing Editor; Edwin M. LaRoche, Dorothy Donnell, Gladys Hall, E. M. Heinemann. 
Robert J. Shores, Associate Editors; Guy L. Harrington, Sales Manager; Frank Griswold Barry, Advertising Manager; 
Archer A. King, Western Advertising Representative at Chicago. 

Copyright, 1917, in United States and Great Britain, by The M. P. Publishing Co., a New York Corporation. 
J. Stviart Blackton, President; E. V. Brewster, Sec.-Treas., publishers of Motion Picture { qISu?™ 6 

Subscription, $1.50 a year in advance, including postage in the U. S., Cuba, Mexico and Philippines; in Canada. 
$2; in foreign countries, $2.50. Single copies, 15 cents, postage prepaid. One-cent stamps accepted. Subscribers 
must notify us at once of any change of address, giving both old and new address. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



175 Duffield .Street, Brooklyn, N. Y 



Member Audit Bureau of Circulation 




CHAWLEY CHAPLIN, CAPERING CUPID, WHO IS STILL PUNCTURING THE 
AFFECTIONATE HEARTS OF THE PUBLIC WITH HIS QUEER 
ANTICS, SENDS VALENTINE GREETINGS TO YOU ALL 



nALLERy or 
DUCTURE. ' 



VALESKA SURATT 
(Fox) 




m^T^^ 




a mm \ai iDnnri' i\k-C\ \ 




Photo by Fhotoplayers Studio 




i 

mm 




Photo by Apeda 




* 



Photo by Witzcl 



BESSIE LOVE (Triangle! 





FRANK KEENAN 













MARIE WALCAMP 
(International^ 




Photo by Apeda 



LOUISE HUFF (Lasky) 




II 









LIONEL ADAMS (Paragon) 



, 




FRITZI RIDGEWAY (Universal) 




ovie Queen V of Hearts 



When Cupid goes a-searching for this little Queen of Hearts, 
With arrow poised and ready to shoot its poisoned darts, 
His aim will surely tell him that he'll find the dainty Queen 
Of Hearts and Love and Romance on the Motion Picture screen. 

34 



fr^l?^ 



^YA rfie M>v/e ^oMs^ af 7/ome 

¥ 'fiojfrerfa Court/attest 



$%$% 






There's a great big fascination (to the 
uninitiated) in the private life of a 
movie player. The public's curi- 
osity is insatiable. One sweet young 
thing makes the life of the Answer Man 
not worth living by agitated queries as 
to the color of socks favored by Luke 
McFlim, the popular movie king. Some 

one else But there ! why moralize ? 

The subject under discussion in this par- 
ticular piece of writing is to give you a 
peek into the home-lives of some of the 
players. Here's Mary Anderson, being 
lovingly dashed 







TOM 
FORM AN 



MINTA DL'RFEE AND ROSCOE 



\RBUCKLE 



DUSTIN FARNUM 

AND 
KID VAN TREKS 



1 



36 WITH THE MOVIE FOLKS AT HOME AND ABROAD 



MARY ANDERSON 




MABEL TRUNNELLE 



LENORE ULRICH 



proper 
a m u s e- 
ment for 
even the 
most exclu- 
sive of de- 
butantes. 
T h e n , 
here's Mabel Normand, beginning the 
day's work by greeting her canine friends at the 
studio. They are to work in the picture on this 
bright morning,, and among the first duties set for 
them is to get properly interested in their parts. This 
Mabel is helping them to do. • 

Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Arbuckle — otherwise 'Tatty" 
and Minta Durfee — have run afoul of a sad ac- 
cident on the way from their Venice home to the 
Keystone studio. The car — a birthday present from 



WITH THE MOVIE FOLKS AT HOME AXD ABROAD 



37 



Out on the golf-links of Chi- 
cago's Country Club, you will 
find two gentlemen engaged in a 
heated argument. Little as you 
would suspect it from their ap- 
pearance, they are, ordinarily, the 
best of friends, but just at present 
they seem the worst of enemies. 
The gentleman in white, who is 
dressed up (he is wearing a 
tie, you will notice — a care- 
lessly knotted slimpsy tie 
— but a tie, never- 
theless), is E. H. 
Calvert, director 
n d heavy-man 
for Essanay, 
while the 
a r e 1 e s s 1 y 
dressed 




duty to 

expresses it, 



fix that off 
while Minta 



stands by, smiling encouragingly and of- 
fering liquid refreshment. These annoy- 
just will happen, y'know! 



ing little thin 



eye, is Henry 

the same dearly 

tie Colonel" who added 

excitement and general 

"The Birth of a Nation," 



g entl e- 
man, with 
his cap 
hung non- 
chalant 1 y 
over his 
Walthall!— 
beloved "Lit- 
greatly to the 
enjoyment of 



38 



WITH THE MOVIE FOLKS AT HOME AND ABROAD 



Tom Forman, clad in bathrobe and 
slippers, gayly greets the glad morning 
sun in search of the morning paper. 
Perhaps his joy is due to the fact that he 
really found the paper just where he left 
it, and not where the milkman, having 
finished his leisurely perusal of it, had 
discarded it. Or it may be that Tom 
is glad he is going- to have a day off 
from the studio, or maybe he is soon to 
begin a new play in which he again plays 
the sweetheart of Blanche Sweet. (It 
doesn't seem fair for a fellow to be paid 
actual money for such a task, when there 
are men galore who would gladly give an 
eye for the chance to do it for nothing ! ) 

Lenore Ulrich, svelte, exquisitely clad, 
as usual, is always accompanied to and 
from the studio by her beautiful dog — 
an exceedingly picturesque appendage. 
He really and truly belongs to her, too. 
Here she is seen departing for the haunts 
of toil — in other words, the Morosco 
studios. If you were commanded by the 
lovely Lenore to ''Love me, love my dog," 
would you find it a difficult task ? 

Mabel Trunnelle- enjoys a somewhat 
unique hobby — or favorite amusement. 
It's cooking. She dearly loves to potter 
about her pretty blue-and-white kitchen- 
ette, attired in a most businesslike, 
checked gingham apron, and to concoct 
all sorts of delightful dishes for the epi- 
curean palate of friend husband, other- 
wise known as Herbert Prior. 

Dus'tin Farnum has a protege — a little 
bit of a fellow who, when mounted on a 
table, reaches barely to Dusty's shoulder. 
Dusty takes the greatest pride in his 



friendship with the little fellow, and they 
are rapidly becoming inseparables about 
the Morosco studio. The lucky boy is 
O. Kid Van Trees, which seems entirely 
too much name for so small a bo v. He 
says that when he grows up he's going 
to be a leadin' man, like Mr. Dusty, and 
play love-scenes with a girl as pretty as 
Winifred Kingston. Some ambition, 
O.K.! 

Ruth Roland is a persnickety -young 
lady when it comes to her own per- 
sonal possessions. And Ruth wanted a 
car that would be entirely different from 
anything in California. She sought thru 
all the automobile shops, but could find 
nothing that pleased her as being dis- 
tinctively individual. So one obliging 
young salesman suggested that she de- 
sign something herself and have the fac- 
tory he represented build it for her. No 
sooner said than done ! And when it was 
finished — Long Beach, as well as the rest 
of California, stands off and silently 
admires it. 

It is a sedan chair ; robin's-egg blue as 
to exterior, highly polished ; parrot-scar- 
let as to interior. And Ruth wasn't satis- 
fied with designing the car — she must 
needs design a frock to go with it — and 
here we get the idea for the combination 
of colors, for Ruth's "motoring dress" is 
a soft white flannel, with a broad sailor 
collar which is embroidered in blue, while 
a scarlet tie finishes it ! Three cheers for 
the red, white and blue ! In the car with 
Ruth is Mabel Condon, the publicity ex- 
pert and correspondent for the Dramatic 
Mirror. 



The Phantom Rider 



By RALPH COOLE 



When the guy that takes the pitchers starts 
the crank to twistin' round, 
An' that d'rector guy jumps up. an' hol- 
lers "Now!" 
I swing my ol' sombrero plumb aroun' my 
frazzlin' head, 
An' that hoss o' mine perceeds to start a 
row; 
An' I register some action fer them woolly 
Western fillums — 
I'm a ridin' fool from Pecos, tha's no 
lie- 
But a-ridin' clost beside me is a guy 
they never see- — 
It's the rider that I was in days gone by ! 



Oh I've rid the line fer hours with a 
"norther" in my face 
Blowin' sixty mile a hour 'cross the 
range ; 
An' I've kep' them steers a millin' till the 
wind was done blowed out, 
An' the sun come peepin' thru jest fer a 
change; 
An' I jest caint he'p a-thinkin', when I'm 
doin' of them stunts, 
That the boss could get a thriller if he'd 
try 
Fer to rig him up a camera what would 
fotigraft the past 
An' the rider that I was in days gone by ! 



CHARLIE CHAI'LTX 




Falling — On and Off the Screen 

By ROBERT FRANCIS MOORE 



"OAN you do a fall?" That's the first 
\^i question asked of an aspirant to 
screen comedy. Now, that doesn't 
mean can the candidate just fall down 
when told, but can he do it, without 
hurting himself, in such a way as to get 
a big laugh ? That is where the art lies. 

Being an ardent comedy fan, I had 
often wondered just how some of these 
remarkable tumbles were accomplished 
without serious injury to the participants, 
so I determined to talk to some of the 
brightest luminaries in that branch of 
the profession and get some first-hand 
information. ' 

So, accordingly, I journeyed out to 
the Lone Star studio and caught Mr. 
Chaplin during one of his breathing 
spells. Backing him up into a corner 
where he couldn't escape, I proceeded to 
satisfy my curiosity. 

"Now, Mr. Chaplin,'' I said, "I want 
to know how you manage some of those 
tricky tumbles." 

Mr. Chaplin glanced wildly from side 
to side, but, seeing there was no way 
out, composed himself as he would on 
entering the dentist's chair. 

"Well," he said, "I dont know that 
there is any particular method to it. I've 



been clowning ever since I was a kid, and 
it seems as tho the ability for that sort 
of thing was just naturally born in me. 
I guess it's really a matter of getting into 
the spirit of your work and letting 
yourself go." 

"But haven't you any way of breaking 
the shock?" I asked. "You cant just 
take a chance on landing on your head." 

"Why, of course there are several 
tricks for breaking stage- falls, which are 
of great service in this game. I use my 
neck and shoulders as bumpers. By 
turning my head in the jar, all comes on 
my shoulder-blades, but, of course, it 
looks on the screen as tho I were fractur- 
ing my skull. Then, also, if I have to be 
struck from the front, and fall backward, 
I throw my right leg forward and up. 
This pulls my left leg with it, and I land 
on my neck. , Your hands are a big asset, 
too. But you mustn't let the camera see 
you use them. When I fall forward, 1 
break the force with the palms of my 
hands and with my chest. The principal 
thing to remember is to make the tumble 
seem spontaneous and look natural, not 
studied." 

"Doesn't your work require very care- 
ful timinsf?" I asked. 



39 



40 



FALLING— ON AND OFF THE SCREEN 



Mr. Chaplin smiled and- reflectively 
rubbed one elbow. 

"It certainly does," he said, with em- 
phasis ; "but once in a while we slip up 
on it. The other day we were rehearsing 
a scene in which I had to be knocked 
over backward while carrying a load of 
dishes. The other fellow hit me just a 
second too soon, and I couldn't shift the 



Murdock, of the F.alem, is another who 
belongs to this latter class. "I am 
tempted to believe," he says, "that I have 
been falling all my life, at least for the 
past eighteen years, always right side up, 
and without any aftermath of injury." 
This is indeed an enviable record, but I 
am inclined to think that Mr. Murdock 
should "knock wood" with Mr. Chaplin. 




IT LOOKS AS THO I WERE FRACTURING MY SKULL 



crockery quickly enough. There was a 
bit of a smash, and I got rather an 
enlargement on one arm." 

"Have you ever been really hurt?" 

Charlie rapped quickly on a convenient 
scene frame with his knuckles. 

"Never seriously," he replied, "altho 
we all get our share of bruises. Then, 
you just let yourself go ; there really isn't 
much danger. I enjoy it." 

There are two varieties of tumbling 
comedians — those who acquire the art by 
means of long practice, and those to 
whom it seems to come naturally. Henrv 



Where did you learn the art of fall- 



ing?" I asked him. 



"I dont think I ever did," he replied, 
smiling. "T just fell into the art of 
falling." 

Which goes to show that Henry is a 
wit as well as a tumbler. 

"Which kind of falls do you consider 
easiest to make?" 

Mr. Murdock seemed to take me seri- 
ously for the first time. 

"Falling down a flight of steps is 
easiest for me, and it nearly always gets 
a good laugh. You see, I can use my 



FALLING— ON AXD OFF THE SCREEN 



41 



hands all the time. Some of the 
most dangerous and difficult drops, 
such as falling from a window or 
out of a tree, are not half so ef- 
fective on the screen as some of the 
easier ones." 

"Have you any particular method 
for breaking your spills?" 

"My two best friends are my 
hands," he said. "I use them for 
every fall, no matter how I land 
I seem to know intuitively when to 
stick them out, or else they do it of 
their own accord. I had an inter 
esting little experience, the other 
day, which illustrates this well. We 
w r ere out 'on location,' and I had to 



: Hill 




THE PICTURE ABOVE SHOW'S CHARLIE CHAPLIN IN ONE A. M." III". IS ROCKING 

THE BOAT" LIKE HE DID ON THE LADDER IN "THE PAWN SHOP," AND TAKES 

HIS FALL GRACEFULLY. THE LOWER PICTURE SHOWS HENRY MURDOCH 

TAKING A NASTY FALL IN "THAT PESKY PARROT" (KALEM) 

WHILE MARY ROSS IS THROTTLING IVY CLOSE 



42 



FALLING— ON AND OFF THE SCREEN 



enter a -scene and crank up a one-lunged 
auto of the vintage of 'ninety-five and 
speed out. We tried it once, but the 
director thought it too slow and ordered 
full speed ahead. I proceeded to crank. 
Suddenly, without warning, the crazy 
car leaped down the street. I made a 
wild grab and, catching the front seat, 
climbed aboard. As I hit the front seat, 
the car hit a wagon driven by a negro. 
Then it was auto, negro, wagon and all 
in more or less of a mess. I landed 
on the curbstone, but by relaxing my 
muscles and using my hands I Wasn't 
hurt a bit. The other three principals 
in the little drama were badly demoral- 
ized. It got a big laugh, but, unfortu- 
nately, the camera-man missed it. You 
can see I was born either to drown or 
hang." 

One of the newer tumbling comedians, 
whose rise to fame has been rapid, is 
Ben Turpin, of the Vogue comedies. 
"In my opinion," says Mr. Chaplin, "Ben 
Turpin is one of the few really good 
comedians in the Motion Pictures. He 
earns every laugh he gets." 

"Are you also one of those to whom 
the body-smashing art comes natural?" I 
asked of the Vogue fun-maker. 

"Yes and no," he replied. "I always 
had a fondness for that kind of work, 
but several years ago I joined a circus 
troupe as a producing clown, and, nat- 
urally, that job i^ave me a chance to 
practice a fine Jfcie of neck-breakers. 
That's really wlcre I got. my experience. 
I dont rely much on science in taking 



Did You 

By FREDERICK 

Did you ever sit enraptured 

At a Motion Picture show, 
Lost to everything around you 

As you watched the story grow — 
Each nerve tense — and then behind you, 

From some rude barbarian throat, 
Hear a sentence, shrill, incisive, 

"Gee! that woman gets my goat"? 

Did you ever feel the tear-drops 

From beneath your eyelids start, 
When some wondrous gem of acting 

Seemed somehow to wring your heart? 
Seemed somehow to bring you nearer 

To the whole vast human race — 
And then hear right there beside you, 

"She can act, but what a face!" 



falls, for really the most scientific tum- 
bler in the world may easily hurt himself. 
My motto is : Throw yourself into the 
game and trust in Providence." 

Some of the greatest exponents of 
slapstick tumbling are those whose names 
never appear on the screen programs. 
These are the famous Keystone "cops." I 
was talking the other day to one of the 
directors of that studio, and he made the 
statement that this brand of grief-killers 
had done as much and more than any 
star to win popularity for the Keystone 
comedies. "Why," he said, "in the old 
days, when there wasn't enough body to 
the scenario, when the 'gags' were falling 
flat and everything was going wrong, the 
never-failing remedy was to call in the 
'cops' to pull the picture thru." 

These are - picked men, daredevils, 
ready for anything, from driving an auto- 
mobile thru the side of a house to shoot- 
ing the same machine ofT a fifty-foot pier. 
And there isn't any fake to what you see, 
either. The Keystone maintains its own 
hospital, and it is surprising how few 
cases are treated there. Of course there 
are the usual quota of bruises to be 
dressed and an occasional sprained ankle, 
but nine times out of ten the performers 
get away clear. I asked the director 
how he accounted for this. 

"It's because we tell them where to 
fall," he said. "Sometimes they miss the 
mark, and then some one gets hurt ; but 
they get hardened to it, and we have some 
on our pay-roll whom you couldn't kill 
with a steam roller." 



rLver f 

WALLACE 

Have you ever watched in wonder 

For the climax of the play, 
When some valiant movie hero 

Risked his life to save the day — 
Felt your blood somehow run swifter, 

Felt your tense-drawn muscles ache- 
And then heard a sneer behind you, 

"Gosh! that scene's a rotten fake"? 

I can stand the Board of Censors, 

'Tis their place to criticise; 
But I tremble when I hear the 

Comments of the would-be wise, 
Scraps of raw misinformation 

Into scenes of beauty dragged — 
Haven't got the nerve to shoot 'em, 

But I'd like to see 'em gagged. 



What Their Handwriting Portrays 



By FRITZI REMONT 



The pen is mightier than the palm, 
more reliable than the planets, and 
a part of one's very self in de- 
lineating character and habits. "Every 
little movement has a meaning all its 
own" and mirrors clearly the writer's 
personality. Even as the graphonola 
records the human voice or other sounds, 
the pen is making a record of him who 
wields it, whether he be conscious of the 
fact or not. The cruelties of which an 
Oliver Cromwell was capable are set 
down for all time in his writing, even 
tho there were no histories to record 
them. Understanding the principles of 
graphology, one may draw a pen-picture 
of an individual quite as accurately as the 
talking-machine reproduces his voice. 



Astrology imputes to those having the 
same birth-month certain general charac- 
teristics, but, unless a special horoscope 
be cast, glaring discrepancies will appear 
in the reading. He who has mastered 
the principles of reading character from 
handwriting is not dependent upon any 
reference to age, nationality, or date of 
nativity. 

At a time when many are inquiring 
"What assets must be mine that I may 
enter the Motion Picture field and be a 
success?" character-sketches, enumerat- 
ing the chief factors which have led to 
fame and fortune our best-known photo- 
players, should prove helpful to the 
aspirant for stellar honors and spur 
him on to emulation of their virtues. 



WILLIAM S HART 



Aggression, determination and in- 
sistence are qualities which bring 
a man to the fore in any field, but 
which have proven 
especially valuable 
assets to Mr. Hart. 
In addition to these, 
he is patient and per- 
severing, possesses 
much originality and 
a bump of construc- 
tivity. He has in- 
genuity and resource- 
fulness, and it would 
be difficult, indeed, to 
assign a task to him 
which he could not 
fulfil. He can over- 
come almost any ob- 
stacle, and has no 
fear of defeat in any- 
thing he undertakes. 
He is a quick thinker, 
instantly connecting- 
cause and effect, and, 
as his mental and 
physical vitality are 
almost evenly bal- 
anced, he has great powers of endurance. 
Mr. Hart is a foe to set rules ; he is 
unconventional, yet intensely practical 




43 



and possessed of concise ideas, strong 
convictions and equally pronounced preju- 
dices. He never demands of others more 
than he can certainly 
fulfil himself, is un- 
selfish, kind and very 
sympathetic. The 
tightly closed small 
a and o s'how that he 
is uncommunicative 
about personal mat- 
ters, vet he is an en- 
tertammg conversa- 
tionalist and well 
versed — a man who 
will be ever acquisi- 
tive of knowledge, 
being keenly observ- 
ant and a good judge 
of human nature. He 
trusts but few and 
takes very little on 
faith. He must be 
convinced by logical 
argument, yet, when 
asked to solve a prob- 
lem to which there 
seem to be several 
good solutions, his alert mentality at once 
takes the short-cut to success. He is a 
trained thinker, yet often governed by 



44 



WHAT THEIR HANDWRITING PORTRAYS 



impulse, as the greatly inclined slant of 
his writing shows, the connected letters 
betraying connected thought. 

Being intensely affectionate, he has the 
ability to portray emotion and sentiment, 
yet the gift of shrewdness, a natural 
reticence, reserve and dignity enable this 
famous actor to hide emotion under the 



ness" if left without accouterments in a 
desolate spot. 

Mr. Hart makes his plays; they have 
never made him the artist he is. Incon- 
sistencies of the photoplay are adroitly 
hidden by his ingenuity and resourceful- 
ness. He has the faculty of biding his 
time and waiting patiently for renown, 




impenetrable mask of an Indian when he 
chooses so to do. 

Mr. Hart has a strong sense of humor 
and so much magnetism that he can hold 
the attention of his audience thru sheer 
force of emphatic personality. He is 
highly artistic, a lover of form, one who 
is never happier than when living a free 
life out of doors, free from fear, and pos- 
sessed of both moral and physical cour- 
age. His adaptability is such that I am 
sure he would "set a table in the wilder- 



even as he might wait for revenge. 
While tender and patient with infirmity, 
kind to all dumb animals, he does not 
easily forget a personal injury. Under- 
standing the weaknesses of others, he 
would be in a position to repay old scores 
without resorting to physical violence. 
His words carry weight, and would sear 
the soul of him who had injured this 
man, who, being versatile enough to essay 
any role, yet remains the ideal American 
actor of Western parts. 



VIOLET MERSEREAU 



The enthusiasm and ambition of this 
young girl know no bounds. She 
can sound the gamut of emotions, 
for her lines of romance and sentiment 
are powerfully defined, yet she has im- 
mense determination and 
firmness, so that she may play 
parts requiring stern self- 
control. She has the spirit 
which made Columbus fa- 
mous in his day; she is an 
explorer in the truest sense 
of the word. Nothing daunts 
her ; fear is almost unknown 
to her, and, with her ag- 
gression and courage, her 
splendid mental and physical 
vitality, her lofty ideals, quick 
decisions and rapid-fire im- 
pulses, I can see her only like a brilliant 
comet, almost startling her audience with 
her rapid thought-processes. She is a star 
who leaves a brilliant trail of light when- 
ever she flashes on the histrionic horizon. 
There is nothing half-hearted in her 
work ; it is her whole self ; yet, with her 
strong buoyancy, she should feel very 




little weariness or after-effect from her 
acting. 

Miss Mersereau has a great love of 
approbation, and, while always sympa- 
thetic and ready to praise others, she is 
highly appreciative of kindly 
criticism of her own work. 
She acts on the spur of the 
moment at all times, is a child 
of nature, and, like the skies, 
can weep or smile and astonish 
those who know her with 
these rapid changes of mood. 
The wavy base-lines and sud- 
den changes of slope, as well 
as unconscious pen-pressure, 
indicate histrionic ability and 

moods. Like all enthusiastic 

j-j 

people, she sometimes goes too 

fast and has sudden reversions of feel- 
ing, is subject to blue-devils and momen- 
tarily disheartened. But her aforesaid 
buoyancy and longing for new fields 
to conquer always aid her in rising on 
the crest of the wave. This is partly due 
also to her excellent wit and sense of 
humor. 



WHAT THEIR HANDWRITING PORTRAYS 



45 



Miss Mersereau is self-possessed as 
well as impulsive, and has a strongly 
developed love-nature. She takes great 
pride in the achievements of those dear to 
her. She is a good entertainer and can 
keep people interested and happy when 



tardy in social engagements, but is un- 
selfish, kind-hearted and benevolent, and 
her friends readily forgive these small 
lapses because her virtues and talents so 
far overbalance her shortcomings. 

Miss Mersereau was born to rule ; she 




they visit her. She is very musical and 
temperamental, and might quite as well 
have developed that talent. She is self- 
willed and sometimes perverse, but so 
lovable that one forgets these things by 
force of her strong magnetism and at- 
tractive personality. She is apt to pro- 
crastinate on disagreeable duties, to be 



is resourceful and has natural creative 
ability, and could not become subservient 
to those less gifted than herself. She is 
original, and enjoys the unusual and even 
the mystic. 

With such varied abilities, it is no 
wonder that this young star has achieved 
fame before she is out of her teens. 



BLANCHE SWEET 



With the soul of a poet and an in- 
tense love of poetry, Blanche 
Sweet is sentimental and im- 
pulsive, as well as artistic and capable of 
building bright air-castles, many of 
which are sure to come true, for Miss 
Sweet writes a ''successful" 
hand, from the financial 
Standpoint. 

Her chief factor for success 
is a plastic and impression- 
able mind. She is not a 
young woman of decided per- 
sonal inclinations, altho fond 
of nature and of literature, 
but she is led by the stronger 
wills with whom she comes 
in contact. Not that she is 
lacking in will power, and 
even in a mild form of stub- 
bornness and of strong con- 
victions, but she is obedient and willing 
to learn from the experiences of those 
who have traveled a hard road before 
her. The plain, small and unadorned 
capitals show that Miss Sweet is re- 
markably free from conceit and preju- 
dices, and adulation, which would have 
turned the head of any other young girl, 
has only served to impress her with a 




desire to become more worth}' of the 
public approval of her acting. There is 
much humility in this hand, even tho she 
is gifted with bright imagination and 
fancy. 

Miss Sweet is quite versatile, has ex- 
ceedingly concise and practi- 
cal ideas, and is somewhat 
matter-of-fact in her dealings 
with those whom she meets. 
She is unaffected and affec- 
tionate, has high ideals, and 
is generous, humanitarian and 
unselfish. 

Her gentle humor and ami- 
ability endear her to her 
friends. She is conscientious 
and even critical, and gives 
close attention to her work. 
She is punctual in business 
affairs and is careful in her 
expenditures, having very good judgment 
in financial matters. 

Blanche Sweet is imitative, and I am 
sure that, as a child, she was a source of 
amusement to her elders. She is so ob- 
servant, and often droll, that her words 
carry weight. She is deliberate in 
thought and in movement and possessed 
of a very attractive and childlike naivete. 



46 



WHAT THEIR HANDWRITING PORTRAYS 



She builds up foundations, and they prove 
solid, for she does not exercise woman's 
privilege to change her mind so fre- 



demonstrative, but is a sincere friend to 
those whom she really trusts. It is not 
possible for her nature to make indis- 



Q^^c^n^Q_ ^Uaj-ol/ 



quently as to cause personal disaster. 
Like a fair flower, she prefers not to be 
transplanted, and is loyal to her sur- 
roundings and associates. She is not 



criminate friendships ; she is happy with 
a few, and can be contented even when 
alone. Out of her sweetness of disposi- 
tion she has created her own world. 



HENRY B. WALTHALL 



Critical analysis and scientific think- 
ing are the two great assets which 
enable Mr. Walthall to dissect each 
character he is to portray, to follow up 
the author's delineation of a role with the 
most subtle analysis of emo- 
tions, and then, with wonder- 
ful sincerity, to reproduce 
that which his brilliant mind 
has grasped. He is his own 
best critic, and is keenly ob- 
servant of detail to the most 
minute matter of make-up. 
Mr. Walthall thinks very 
quickly, even while he de- 
pends on logic. He has every 
aesthetic gift, and his writing 
strongly resembles that of 
Edgar Allan Poe, in whose 
immortal poem Mr. Walthall 
was featured. He has the soul of a poet 
and the fancy of an artist, combined with 
great practicality, sentiment and a dash 
of coquettishness, as indicated by his for- 
ward sloping small letter "d" with its 
gracefully drooping short curve. This 
letter also shows active fancy. He is 
unselfish, intuitive, and should always be 




but. stimulated to greater effort. He can 
concentrate deeply, is always acquisitive 
of knowledge, has infinite tact and diplo- 
macy, and the quality of biding his time 
and awaiting results. While subject to 
moments of deep depression, 
his nature is buoyant, and 
lie recovers quickly and is 
spurred on to fresh triumphs. 
Mr. Walthall's sympathies 
are quickly aroused, and his 
kind heart responds to those 
in need. However, he will 
not disclose his charities, and 
is not demonstrative in public. 
He is possessed of much dig- 
nity and restraint, is exceed- 
ingly temperamental, in spite 
of these qualities, and, owing 
to the repression of natural 
impulses, is subject to nervous reac- 
tion. Like many gifted men, he is sure 
of his own talents — a just self-appraisal. 
Mr. Walthall might well have been 
a physician or surgeon — his humani- 
tarian instincts are so strong, his sympa- 
thies so quick, his mind so scientifically 
inclined. 



y^/£^i^^-y /3 C<Ja^C££:*d£z^ 



guarded by his first impressions of those 
whom he meets, since this quality is really 
his guardian angel and will preserve him 
from many dangers. 

There is a well-developed strain of 
originality and ingenuity in this charac- 
ter, as well as a great love of form, neat- 
ness and system. His mental and phys- 
ical activity are such that many men 
might give way to fatigue where he is 



His faculty of logical reasoning and de- 
ductive analysis would have fitted him 
for the bench or bar. However, his in- 
nate artistic sense, his emotion and intui- 
tive development and desire to produce 
that which he feels and knows are such 
that acting became a necessity to him, 
who is perhaps best known as "The 
Little Colonel" of "The Birth of a 
Nation." 



WHAT THEIR HAXDWRITIXC PORTRAYS 



47 



WILLIAM GARWOOD 



One could not picture Mr. Garwood 
as overacting at any time, for he is 
innately cautious and pays great 
attention to detail. Yet he is enthusi- 
astic, possesses a 
splendid imagina- 
tion, and has won- 
derful lines of fancy, 
romance and senti- 
ment. 

He is practical 
and possessed of 
concise ideas, and is 
•subject to prejudices 
as well as to pro- 
crastination, as may 
be deduced from the 
fact that he fre- 
quently crosses the 
small "t" to the left 
of the letter. How- 
ever, every adverse 
trait in his character 
is counterbalanced 
by a good one, so 
that his faithfulness 
to the little things 
and his conscien- 
tiousness offset the 
procrastination, 
which may be an in- 
herited trait. His 
orejudices are over- 
come by his love- 
nature and general 
kindliness, and he 
is cautious because 
practicality balances 
imagination and 
sentiment. Mr. Garwood always likes to 
dress and appear well, and is fastidious 
to a degree. He is cultured and refined, 
and comes of good family, and shows 
strong moral and religious training and 





and easily. He is surely possessed of 
that savoir faire which creates warm 
friendships in both sexes. He is unselfish 
and trustworthy, proud, self-reliant and 
independent. He will 
probably meet with 
much ingratitude, 
since he gives so 
much more than he 
receives, and his giv- 
ing is so spontaneous 
that it is not always 
judicious. 

Mr. Garwood will 
make very few ene- 
mies : he will be 
successful financially, 
and he will accom- 
plish great things in 
his art because of his 
faithfulness over the 
little things. He 
sows so much good 
that he cannot help 
drawing good things 
to himself. 

He possesses much 
dignity, reserve, self- 
respect and pride, 
yet these are balanced 
by his affectionate 
impulses. He is argu- 
mentative and some- 
times stubborn, but 
never bears malice, 
and is broad-minded 
enough to relinquish 
a theorv when one 
has proven, by argu- 
ment, that he is in the wrong. 

He is a good critic and will study him- 
self as thoroly as any outsider. His ideals 
are so high that nothing short of daily 
improvement in his work will ever satisfy 






isOtC&LJ 




good home surroundings. lie is cheer- 
ful and obliging, very sympathetic, 
friendly and kind-hearted. 

He should be an excellent swimmer, 
walker or dancer, and writes gracefully 



^-£<^w4<f 



him. In short, he is a practical idealist — 
a man who can harness his dreams to his 
tasks — and this accounts for his vogue 
with the Moving Picture fans. 
(To be continued) 




C//orzf o/^ 



Deep down in the green bosom of the 
lake a water-sprite was dancing. 
The forest that lies beneath the 
waves fluttered its leaves noiselessly, 
scattering gold sun-drops on the honey- 
colored hair ; the ragged skirt of coarse, 
peasant weave floated about her slender 
limbs as gracefully and airily as a gauze 
veil. 

On the high banks above the lake 
Yolanda flung her round, bare arms 
above her shining head and laughed 
aloud as she swayed and dipped to the 
unheard strains of the youth-fugue within 
her. The piercing, sweet notes of the 
wild song-birds within the forest rained 
in a shower of golden sound thru the 
air, fragrant with the short, sensuous 
summer of Russia. 

In the road, beyond the screen of 
quaking aspen, two men drew rein. 

"Blood of my fathers !" swore the 



This story was written from the Vitagraph 

at the huge paws, encased in leather 
gauntlets that called for a half-hide in 
the making. Then he turned his cool 
eyes upon the unconscious dancer, and his 
thin, aristocratic ' nostrils lifted slightly. 

"Undeveloped, not more than seven- 4 
teen, and quite amazingly lovely," 
he drawled. 4 T trust, Boris, you 
have no scheme for transplanting 
this flower of the wildwood? 
Ah ! we have startled the fawn 
with our huntsman growl- 
ings ! She vanishes ! 
us do likewise." 

The girl had stopped, in 
the midst of a pirouette, 








older, a 
black bear j{M of a man 

with a stiff X\WJV3lCT)il< beard 
and small e y e s 

lurking under enormous brows. "Sal- 
vini herself is heavy-footed and gross 
beside this paragon ! Seest thou the 
slimness of her waist, Sergius ? My two 

hands could span it " 

His companion cast a sardonic glance 



48 



COME TRUE PREMIERE 

IMPERIAL 

to cast a glance over her shoulder in the 
direction of their voices. A deep rose- 
flush swept her from forehead to the bare 
bosom between the brown lacings of her 
bodice. She gathered her skirts together 
as a bird prepares its plumage for flight. 
Then she glanced back. A flash of mis- 
chief illuminated the piquant face, her 
arm rose high, and a pink wild-rose, 
still warm from her hair, fell on the 






fa/a/zdfr y J?*™?// 




Her mother, 
and scorched 
of life, stood 
sod hut, peer 
her shriveled 
h a n d. " A h 
thou, little pigeon 



path b e- 

tweenthem. 

When they 

looked up from 

the 

coquetry, she 
was gone. 
Olga, brown 
by the flames 
before the 
ing under 
claw of a 

there art 

she moaned, as 



Yolanda panted over the last fallows of 
the field and flung strong, young arms 
about her neck in a breathless huff. 



49 



"Leo, here, has waited long for thee," she 
motioned toward the 

tall, £!teWS»KjLv - a w k w a r d 
jSjS young peas- 
k»*d ant, in his 
belted frock, 
standing pa- 
tiently near- 
by. Yolan- 
da flung a 
careless 
glance at her 
humble adorer. 
"Pooh! I 
have had 
braver birds 
than he to 
wing!" she 
s c o f f e d. 
"Little 
mother, as I 
danced in 
the forest 
just now, I 
think the Tsar 
himself rode 
by !" 

"God ha' mercy !" 

gasped the old 

woman, hastily 

crossing herself, "thy 

wits are addled. Ah ! thou wast 

But take care, child : the 

Tsar is not a name for fools to toss 

about." 

"Well, it was a great lord, then," said 
Yolanda, carelessly. She pointed down 
the sandy road in triumph. "Judge for 
thyself, for there they come I" 

The old peasant and the brawny Leo 
bowed low as the well-dressed strangers 
drew rein at the gate, but Yolanda tossed 
her honeyed curls, half-abashed, half- 
pleased with their tribute of stares. 

"Good mistress," said he of the black 
beard, peremptorily, "your daughter, 
here, has danced herself into our good 
grace. Where learnt she her art?" 

"No one taught me. It is in here" — 
Yolanda pressed her hand to her heart. 



50 



THE GLORY OF YOLANDA 



She sprang past her courtesying mother 
and stood beside the stranger's horse, 



trembling at her own temerity, eager, 
palpitant. "My father says no good will 
come of it and beats me," she rushed on, 
raising azure eyes to the grim face. "My 
brother, Serge, laughs at me, and Leo, 

here ■ But I must dance, 

or I would die!" 

The Grand Duke Boris knew 
women like a book that has been 
conned again and again ; but he 



Petrograd!" he commanded. "Ask for 
Duke Boris, and I will take care of you. 
She shall dance in the Imperial Ballet, if 
she will, and tread on a gold-piece at 
every footstep!" 

The hoofs of the horses faded into si- 
lence before one of the group stirred. 
Old Olga was gazing at the three 
smooth, yellow disks in her with- 
ered palm as if she could not 
credit her eyes. 

"The saints guard us!" she 





had never known a woman 
just like this slim flame of a 
peasant girl, with her wide, 
innocent eyes that met his without qualm 
or question. He ran a thick tongue over 
the full, crimson lips that edged his beard 
as he gazed on her. His companion, 
Prince Drolinski, openly sneered. 

"Such treasure concealed in a mangy, 
mujik hut!" muttered Boris. He thrust 
his hand into his belt and took out three 
broad gold-pieces which he tossed at 
Olga's feet. "Bring thy fledgling to 



was muttering — "such riches!" 
Leo was looking at Yolanda, his 
whole honest, dogged soul in his 
suffering eyes. "Thou wilt go — I shall 
never see thee again," he murmured. "I 

might have* known " 

But Yolanda, a smile on her, scarlet 
lips, neither saw nor heard, for her ec- 
static gaze was turned on the future, far 
into the heart of her dream. 

"To dance — in the Imperial Ballet!" 
Her young breasts rose on the swell of 
her breath; she turned to the mowing old 



THE GLORY OF YOLANDA 



51 



woman and shook her shoulder impa- 
tiently. 

"Come, little mother," she cried. ''Didst 
thou not hear him — the great man, whose 
goodness is next to God's? There is 
much to do and far to go. Before the 
leaves fall, we must be in Petrograd!" 

The leaves still clung, rusty red, to the 
lindens in the city square, when Yolanda 
and Duke Boris sat in the broad window 



laugh ; but for a month this friendless, 
desirable girl had been within his power, 
and he had made no smallest effort to 
possess her, tho the sweetness of her ran 
like a potent liquor thru his veins. 

"Art thou — happy ?" he asked her now 
with the brusqueness that characterized 
him. "Is this better than thy home-hut 
and thy black bread, little nestling?" 

So spoke his tongue, but his heart cried 
out different words: "So small I could 




YOLANDA PLAYED CATS CRADLE ABSORBEDLY WITH BORIS 



of the handsome apartment he had pro- 
vided for her, playing "cat's cradle" as 
absorbedly as tho it were an affair of 
state. That, at least, was the attitude of 
the girl. She did not guess, as her slim 
fingers fluttered over the strings and her 
childish laugh rang out, what grim emo- 
tions she was causing behind the iron 
mask of the face opposite. Boris was 
puzzled and strangely uneasy with her. 
Her utter defenselessness seemed to raise 
between them an impalpable veil. Bar- 
riers he could break down with his great, 
merciless hands ; walls of prudery or 
modesty he could overleap with a jeering 



crush thee with one of my hands ! So 
weak, so wonderful ! Am I a dog of a 
peasant to be baffled by a maid ?" 

"I am so happy I could dance all day 
long!" laughed Yolanda. "Every one is 
so good to me! The ballet-master is 
gruff to the other dancers, but he smiles 
at me and says I shall succeed. And 
Petrograd is like the fairy-tales my 
mother used to tell me. When I have on 
one of the lovely dresses you gave me 
and the wide hat with the plumes, I look 
in the glass and I bow and cry 'Good day 
to you, Princess of the Fairy-tale V ' 

"There should be a Prince in your 



52 



THE GLORY OF YOLANDA 



story," said Boris, gruffly. He was un- 
skilled in fanciful banter, but he knew a 
blush when he saw one. It flooded the 
girl's rounded cheeks ; it drowned her lips 
and blinded her pure white eyelids; it 
washed in a sweet red wave over the roots 
of her golden hair. 

"Yolanda !" he cried thickly, and would 
have caught her to him, but his fingers 
were webbed with a grotesque criss- 
crossing of strings. Before he had freed 
himself of them, she had sprung to her 
feet and was swaying across the velvet 
carpet in a measure of the ballet. 

"One-two-three, one !" she chanted. 
"See ! I am a flower now, bending in the 
wind " 

His moment was gone for the time, and 
Boris went away, sullen at its loss. Her 
surrender would solve the puzzle of pos- 
sessing her, yet there was something very 
akin to shame in the torpid soul of the 
Duke. For the first time in many years 
he desired a woman cleanly for his wife 
under the eyes of the world. But there 
was a pale, high-born, thin-lipped Duch- 
ess — he had long ago ceased to admire 
her — who had borne his title for twenty 
years. 

If he could have guessed the reason for 
that blush of Yolanda, he would have 
ground his strong white teeth in a passion 
of rage. 

"Yesterday Duke Boris came," Yo- 
landa explained, swinging her slim feet 
in their new finery of gray suede shoes, 
as she perched on the edge of the table. 
"We played 'cat's cradle.' He does not 
do it very well ; his fingers are so thick." 

She regarded her feet with naive ap- 
proval, and the young artist in the paint- 
smeared frock regarded her with even 
greater approval. Then his look dark- 
ened. 

"I dont like your having that old rake 
coming to see you !" he frowned. "Yo- 
landa — dearest heart ! How soon are you 
going to let the whole world know our 
secret? Since I first saw you, six weeks 
ago, at the cathedral,. I cant paint for 
thinking of you — and yesterday, when 
you did not come, I was beside myself 
with fear!" 

"Such an ugly face it is now!" sighed 
Yolanda, regarding his despair critically. 



She dipped a brush in a pool of crimson 
on his palette and touched his lip-corners, 
turning them streakily upward. 

"Now, that is better!" she clapped her 
hands in childish glee. "Thou art my 
handsome Alexander again ! As for 
when I will marry you, you shall paint 
many pictures, I shall dance many dances 
before then!" 

"You are cruel," said Alexander Priby- 
lofT, gloomily. "I almost wish I had 
never seen you." 

Yolanda slid down from the table. "If 
you like, I will at least go away now and 
you need never see me again," she said 
pleasantly. "Perhaps that will be just as 
well. You do not like my dancing ; you do 
not like my kind Duke, who has been so 
good to me, and now you do not like me!" 

"Sweetheart! Forgive mel" Alexan- 
der cried remorsefully. "I am selfish, 
but it is love makes me so ! If I hate 
every one who will watch your dancing, 
it is because I would have you dance only 
for me. If I hate Duke Boris, it is be- 
cause I am not rich enough to give you 
all the things he can. "Sometimes, when 
I think of thousands of greedy eyes in the 
theater watching your beautiful face and 
the beautiful figure God meant only one 
man to see, I wish I could take you up 
in my arms and carry you off to some 
desert place, where there would be no 
one except us two " 

"Foolish Alexander," said Yolanda 
softly, creeping into the circle of his arms, 
"if there were only us two on your island, 
you would forget I was the most beautiful 
woman in the world, because there would 
be no other women to compare me with ; 
and I would forget you were the hand- 
somest,, bravest, strongest of all men " 

The words died on her lips. She stared 
over his shoulder with dilating eyes at the 
frightful face in the doorway, purple 
with congested blood, seamed and twisted 
with brute rage. They had been too 
much engrossed with each other to hear 
the lifting of the latch. 

Even as she gazed, the look was wiped 
from Duke Boris' face as tho by a 
sponge. Heavy of jowl, with small, 
cruel eyes peering under the bushy over- 
hang of brow, he stood before them, 
smiling suavely and showing his great, 
square teeth that gleamed thru the black 



THE GLORY OF YOLAXDA 



53 



beard. Behind him Prince Drolinski's 
tired gaze touched the girl's face an in- 
stant, then lowered to the coat of arms 
on the head of his cane. 

"Pardon this intrusion," begged the 
Duke, smoothly. ''The mother told me 
I might find the little dancer here. So 
you are having your picture painted? It 
should inspire the artist — such a model !" 

He bowed from the waist in Alexan- 
der's direction. The painter coldly re- 
turned the 
w i t h the 
erness of a 
ering difrl- 




bow. Yolanda. 
instinctive clev- 
woman in cov- 



that had seemed strangely full of mut- 
tered things ; the cold of his fingers on 
hers — a cold that burned like fire on her 
flesh ; remembered and shuddered be- 
cause, at last, she knew why Boris had 
been so kind to her. 

'This fine house! these soft clothes!" 
It was Serge, her brother, who spoke in 
a slow voice, choked with rage. With 
Leo he had come to Petrograd to make 
his mother and sister a visit, and they 
had just finished a tour of 

the beautiful ^^^ rooms 








IT SHOULD INSPIRE THE ARTIST SUCH A MODEL?' 



cult situations, slipped into her white fur 
coat and cap, chattering gaily of a dozen 
irrelevancies. But in the carnage, op- 
posite Boris' ominous bulk, with her 
audience eliminated to one, her volu- 
bility deserted her. Remembering his 
face of ten minutes ago, she suddenly 
felt very small and very much alone. 
He was different, and she knew he was 
different, but experience had not yet 
taught her what to fear. 

Later she remembered that drive with 
Boris thru the frozen city gardens, by the 
brown stubble-fields beyond — remem- 
bered his short words and long silences, 



He pointed a rigid finger at Yolanda, 
who had just come in. "She is shame- 
less ! Not a blush, not a quiver of an 
eye. Better to have toiled barefoot in an 
honest hut than to live in a palace as the 
mistress of the Grand Duke!" 

The ugly word struck the girl like a 
blow on her naked heart. She flung out 
her hands as tho to ward off some evil 
thing. 

"No! no! — Serge, I swear " she 

panted. The old mother put her arms 
about her, facing her son with a flash in 
her dim eyes. 

"Shame on thyself to speak such words 



54 



THE GLORY OF YOLANDA 



to thy sister!", she cried. "The great 
Duke Boris is like a father to her. May 
my tongue shrivel in my mouth if I lie !" 

"Mother! Hush! Dont you see — he 
is here." She flung the great, velvet 
hangings back. "You speak for me !" she 
begged the Grand Duke Boris. "Tell 
my brother he is wrong!" 

Above the honev-colored head the two 



the beast trust the hunter? Does the 
great lord give and ask no reward?" 

"The giving is my own pleasure, the 
reward is my own busi- 
ness," replied Boris, 
coolly. "If that does 
not satisfy you, I must 
ask you to leave. Yo- 
landa is free to go, too, 






YOLANDA SHRANK AWAY FROM SERGE S UNSPOKEN DEMAND 



men faced each other 
— the high and the 
low, the aristocrat and 
the peasant; the one 
faultlessly groomed, with soft hands and 
hard smile ; the other in a coarse, artisan 
blouse, bent and bruised and flayed by 
countless generations of numbing tasks. 
Involuntarily, the serf cowed under the 
nobleman's lofty stare. But there was a 
strain of manhood in him that bade him 
stand his ground. 

"Does a dog trust the hand that wields 
the knout?" he asked hoarsely. "Does 



if she wills." Serge turned his haggard 
eyes to his sister, but she shrank away 
from their unspoken demand. Slowly, 
head bent, shoulders bowed with the bur- 
den of the centuries, he turned and passed 
out into the winter streets of -Petrograd. 

After Boris had left, an hour later, 
Yolanda crept into her mother's room, 
and the two peasant women clung to- 
gether, trembling and mingling their 
tears. 

"Serge is right," sobbed Yolanda. "I 
see it now — blind fool I have been ! It 
is not to be kind, not to make a great 



THE GLORY OF YOLANDA 



55 



dancer of me, but to — to own me. That 
is what my Alexander fears. Who 
knows, if I did not have his love to lead 
me ■" 

She dried her eyes and sat up, clench- 
ing her little hands. 

''After I make my appearance in the 
ballet I shall be famous, and then I can 
pay him the money he has spent on me !" 

But the old mother only rocked her 
arms desolately. "He is a great lord, 
and we less than the dust,' 1 
she wailed. "Harm 
will come of it — 
and weeping 
of bitter 
tears." 



umph of the last act, at her dressing-room 
door. 

Crimson-lipped, starry-eyed, she turned 
to him, holding out impulsive hands. 

"I have you to thank for this!'' she 
cried. The purple stain of the bruise 
seemed to spread over his fierce counte- 
nance. He was like a thirsty man tan- 
talizing himself with the sight of drink. 
"I dont want your thanks, Yolanda," 
he said, in a breathless, strangled 
voice; "I want you!" 

It had come, then! 

Yolanda flung a 

bare, pearly 

arm across 

her eyes. 




I KILLED 



WOLF THAT WAS AT MY THROAT ! 



The very old have the gift of prophecy. 
On the night of Yolanda's debut, Alex- 
ander hotly resented the Grand Duke's 
patronizing kiss on the little dancer's 
cheek, as she returned from the stage in 
a storm of huzzas. And he followed his 
resentment with a blow on Boris' sneer- 
ing mouth. 

Yolanda did not see the scuffle nor its 
ending. She was floating too far above 
mundane things for the moment even to 
wonder at her lover's abrupt disappear- 
ance, or the purple bruise on her patron's 
cheeks when he appeared, after the tri- 



"Oh !" she wailed," "how can you?" 
He bent over her, speaking hurriedly, 
the words stumbling over one another. 
"I'll marry you. Of course it will have 
to be morganatic, but that's recognized. 
I've got to have you, Yolanda. I'm 

hungry for you — starving " 

Wildly she beat him oft" and flung her 
cloak about her. She fled out into the 
snowy night, but when her carriage 
started, there he was at her side. They 
did not speak during the ride thru the 
dizzily lighted streets, where the crowds 
were discussing her triumph even now. 



56 



THE GLORY OF YOLANDA 



The silent menace of the great, motion- 
less bulk opposite her chilled her blood. 
She swayed as she went up the steps and 
into her apartment, Boris at her side like 
a monstrous, misfit shadow. 

In the drawing-room she faced him at 
bay. 

"Let me pay you for what you have 
done for me," she begged — "pay you in 
honest gold. My love is given to Alex- 
ander Pribyloff, the painter. I have only 
gratitude and affection left for you.'' 

Boris burst into a 
great bel 
low of 
laugh- 
ter that 



"I've got you now I" he growled. 
"Dont struggle, pretty pigeon— you'll 

only break your pinions ■" 

He boasted too soon. Yolanda, in the 
moment of defeat, caught up a paper- 
knife from the table and stabbed him to 
the heart. 

Her shuddering scream awoke the si- 
lent house. Footsteps stumbled to her 
side. Serge snatched the ensanguined 
knife from her stiffening fingers. 

"I was — with the mother," he gasped 
incoherently. "Yolan- 
da — what have 
you done?" 
"I killed a 
wolf 




DROLINSKI PLEADED TO SAVE HER FROM EXILE 



set every nerve in her body jangling. 

"Alexander! The pretty painter!" he 
jeered. ''He is not likely to stand in my 
way. Tonight he gave me this" — he 
pointed sardonically to his angry cheek — 
"and in return I ordered him sent to 
Siberia. A dirty artisan does not insult 
the Grand Duke with impunity. I might 
have had him beheaded, but I was merci- 
ful. He will start with the convict train 
tomorrow evening. Perhaps the climate 
of the steppes may cool his ardor a little." 

Then, as she recoiled in horror from 
the terrible announcement, he was upon 
her, his hot breath in her face, his great 
arms crushing her to him. 



that was at my throat!" she said in a 

far-away voice — "a hungry wolf " 

"You killed the Grand Duke Boris," 
Serge groaned, "and they will kill 
you " 



But it was not death for Yolanda, after 
all. 

"Siberia!" the judge pronounced in 
awful tones — "Siberia for life!" 

Those who crowded the court-room to 
catch a glimpse of the young danseuse, 
whose triumph had so soon turned to 
tragedy, were amazed at the look of the 
white, lovely face when Yolanda heard 
the judge's words. 



THE GLORY Of YOLAXDA 



57 



"Poor thing, she has lost her mind. 
Did you see how she smiled?" 

But the saturnine Prince Drolinski 
discovered the true reason for her radi- 
ance. He had gone to her in the prison 
with an offer to save her from the dread- 
ful doom of exile, but she shook her head 
with a quiet little smile. 

"Alexander is going to Siberia," she 
told him. "It will not be exile if we are 
together. It will be heaven, for I love 
him and he loves me." 

Later the Prince leaned from his cush- 
ioned carriage, and eagerly watched the 



straggling procession of criminals driven 
like animals along the streets to the train. 
Guards, armed with whips, lashed at 
them savagely ; most of the prisoners 
shuffled along, heads bent, spirits broken, 
like sheep to the slaughter-pen. But t\v< i 
among them walked proudly upright, arm 
in arm — a tall man and a slender, grace- 
ful girl — as on some brave adventure. 

Prince Drolinski sat back against his 
silken cushions. In his eyes was a vast 
weariness. 

"I. could find it in my heart to envy 
them," he sighed. 




PAULA BLACKTON, CHAMPION MOTOR-BOAT1ST, WHO IS NOW STARRING 
IN VITAGRAPH PICTURES 



Have You Tried "Dancing with Folly"? 



By VAL FRANCOIS 



In this story the fault fundamentally 
is that of the husband. Edward Arnold, 
as Enoch Drummond, a famous chem- 
ist, is so wrapped up in his laboratory 
experiments that he clean forgets he 
is married to a lively young woman 
who both demands and deserves lots 
of love and attentions. There are 
many husbands who are guilty of 
that same fault. And in nine out of 
ten cases their wives will do just 
what Marguerite Clayton, as Alice 
Drummond, does. She seeks enter- 
tainment in the company of other 
men. Alice falls an easy prey to the 
handsome young ''society'' man of 
evil intentions, and before she knows 
^ it has contracted a bill with the 
p|| fiddler. Alice's innocence saves 
her. She does not make the ter- 
rible mistake and attempt to 
purchase the villain's silence. 
She goes direct to her husband 




cause of the high cost of cabaret- 
ing been brought to light? Is it 
the checkroom trust which extorts 
its quarter or half-dollar? Or the 
waiter who disdains your orders for 
less than a handsome tip? Or the 
cost of the food and wine you con- 
sume ? Or is it the fiddler ? 

"Dance with Folly,'' and 
you will learn right 
speedily. 

The secret is revealed 
in one of Essanay's dra- 
matic series, "Is Marriage Sacred?" 
which deal with problems of matrimony 



and divorce. 
Folly." 



Its title is "Dancin« 



ith 



58 



and con- 
fesses the 
entire 
truth. 

And he is man enough to realize that 
he, not his wife, is the one to blame. 



WELL! WELL! HERE THE Y ARE AGAIN ! NOW JUST LISTEN TO— 



& 5i»nnr32n/: 

DY • JflM/fy G GaDUT • 



.... 



...... 



HURRAH! THEY VISIT A PICTURE SHOW 



"Is Mrs. Cullen a fri'nd av yours ?" asked 
X Mrs. Brannigan, as she and Mrs. 
Lannigan took their seats at the 
Empire Theater just after the perform- 
ance began. 

"Yis, she is," Mrs. Lannigan re- 
sponded. "What has she been savin' 
about me?" 

"Nothin' bad. She says she's niver 
goin' to tell nothin' but the truth about 
ye." 

"Well, if she does," declared Mrs. 
Lannigan, energetically, "I'll have her 
arristed." 

"She's settin' .over there now," Mrs. 
Brannigan went on, "watchin' the pic- 
tures wid her eyes wide open and her 
mouth fast shut." 

"Her mouth shut ? Hivens ! 'tis impos- 
sible ! It reminds me av a miracle I saw 
lasht winter. In 'A Dangerous Fri'nd' — 
tho, for that matther, all fri'nds are dan- 
gerous ; you niver know when or what 
they are goin' to borrow — but in a play 
av that name a man was operated on in 
a horsepittle. The operation was a grate 
success, but the man died. They cover 
his body wid a nice, clane shate, knowin' 
that it wont hurt the cloth an' they kin 
use it agin as good as iver. Thin the 
docthers an' nurses file out, lookin' awful 
solemn, for he was good lickin's whin he 
was alive, an' 'tis a sad thing to lose a 
male-ticket. Thin the marshy elled wife 
comes rushin' in, to see if he has ray- 
mimbered her in his will, an' carries on 
som'thin' dreadful whin she finds she is 
too late, an' all the while the shate was 
risin' an' fallin' wid ivery breath the dead 



59 



man drew. 'Twas as grate a miracle as 
Mrs." Cullen kapin' her mouth shut." 

"I dont care," Mrs. Brannigan re- 
torted. " 'Twas a mighty fine fillum." 

" 'Twas, indade," Mrs. Lannigan 
agreed, "the best I iver slept thru. 
I " 

"Pardon me, madam," broke in an 
icily, polite voice, and a man in front 
turned and addressed them pointedly. 
"Pardon me, but I paid my hard-earned 
money to see the play and not to hear 
your idle chatter." 

"Thrue fer yez," agreed Mrs. Lanni- 
gan, amiably, "an' by that same token I 
paid my husband's honestly earned cash 
to see Hubbard Rollingstone's handsome 
face an' not your ugly mug, so plaze turn 
your free-lunch destroyer the other way." 

"But, madam " 

"No," interrupted Mrs. Lannigan, de- 
cisively, in a louder tone, so that all 
around could hear — "no, ye cant take me 
home. I have no objection meself, havin' 
wanct worked in an unseed asylum an' 
so bein' used to all kinds av idjits, but me 
husband is more partiklar an' might not 
like it." 

"Dear me," said Mrs. Brannigan, ad- 
miringly, as the man in front subsided, 
with flushed face, into angry silence, amid 
the titters of the surrounding spectators. 
"Isn't Alasky Sorehat swell? What did 
ye say the name av the play was? I 
clane forgot the title." 

" 'The Sole av Broadway,' and fer 
wanct I can agree wid ye. The play is 
indade fine. Tis a grate advance they've 
made since the dear, dead days when the 



60 



THE LANNIGANS AND BRANNIGANS 



swellest theayter was in the worst ould 
store they could find ; where the air was 
as bad as the breath av a Prohibitionist ; 
whin a phony chase or a thin polaceman 
in a fat suit fallin' over an apple-cart was 
the acne av photoplay art — but still I 
sure miss the ulcerated pictures an' the 
songs by the primmer donkey. They 
was " 

"Madam," angrily interrupted an el- 
derly gentleman sitting at one side of 
them, "if you dont stop this senseless 
jabber, I shall call the usher." 

Mrs. Lannigan turned a beaming face 
upon him. "Do," she acquiesced ; "call 
him annything ye like; he's no relation 
av mine." 

"Hivens!" exclaimed Mrs. Brannigan, 
in tones of awe, indicating the figure on 
the screen; "she's gettin' a check fer 
twelve hundred dollars from the ould 
fool. Why, that would take us to the 
Motive Fixtures fer life !" 

"Yis," agreed Mrs. Lannigan, "that is 
almost as much as Mary Mild Winters 
makes in a minit." 

"Who is she?" Mrs. Brannigan asked. 
"I aint niver heard av her." 

"She's a grate salubrity," Mrs. Lanni- 
gan responded. "She was five months 
old nine years afther she was born, an' 
she's been growin' younger iver since." 

"Did ye see Violent Mercyno in 'The 
Path to Happiness,' got out by the Red 
Father paple?" 

"Naw, I didn't ; but I do know that the 
path to happiness lades away from 
matthrimony." 

"I seen Eduth Starry in 'The Slop 
Gyurl' an' she sure was swell," Mrs. 
Brannigan stated. 

"I aint seen her," Mrs. Lannigan re- 
sponded. "Why should I pay good 
money to look at a slop gyurl whin I kin 
see Annie Kelly anny time fer nawthin' ?" 

"What are they 'atin'?" asked Mrs. 
Brannigan, referring to the picture where 
the hero and his mother, impersonated by 
Gertrude Berkeley, were dining together. 

"Nawthin'," Mrs. Lannigan replied. 



"Well," admitted Mrs. Lannigan, 
"some paple miscalls it sqush. But I l'ave 
it to you, Mrs. Brannigan, just the same 
as if ye had intelligence: Why should 
paple ate sqush whin they kin take p'ison, 
which is asier an' quicker?" 

"They do say 'tis fine for soldiers — 
makes thim fight." 

"Well," declared Mrs. Lannigan, "I 
dont blame thim ; 'twould make anny 
man fight that had to eat it." 

"What a nice home that Grace Hamil- 
ton has !." said Mrs. Brannigan, tactfully 
changing the subject. 

"She has that," Mrs. Lannigan as- 
sented. "What a lot av edification ye get 
from the fillums ! Me daughter bein' a 
school-taycher, I spake wid aut'ority on 
the subject." 

"Indade, ye do that," Mrs. Brannigan 
agreed; "I always thot it didn't matther 
how ye wint around at home befoor your 
husband an' childher, till I saw how nate 
Mrs. Sidney Drew looked in her kitchen, 
an' now I'm so careful in me own home 
I'd make the Quane av England ashamed 
av herself." 

"Ladies," broke in a man sitting di- 
rectly behind them, "I do wish you 
would keep quiet ; you distract my atten- 
tion frightfully." 

"Why !" exclaimed Mrs. Lannigan, in 
a tone of delighted surprise, "there's 
Mickey Ragan, who was put in jail for 
b'atin' his sick wife ! How are ye, 
Mickey?" 

"Madam," said the man furiously, "my 
name is Montgomery Marshfield, and 
I've never been in jail in my life. I wont 
stay here to be insulted." And he left 
precipitately, the picture of wrath. 

"1 think ye've hurt his f'alin's," ob- 
served Mrs. Brannigan. 

"I couldn't," Mrs. Lannigan declared 
— "he has too manny. But I wish I was 
out-of-doors wid him — I'd mash his 
face !" 

"Dear me! have ye been 'atin' sqush 
lately?" asked Mrs. Brannigan, inno- 
cently, "and aint it a shame to be nanny- 



Nawthin' ?" 


echoed '. 


Mrs. Brannigan. 


goated be a sthranger ?" 




g 2 Sh 








C 



Our Versatile Comedians 

Film Comedy of Every Trade and Pro- 
fession as Exemplified by Ham and Bud 

By STANLEY W. TODD 



« 




IN producing modern film 
comedy, it seems to have be- 
come more or less of a fixed 
fashion to draw upon the pro- 
fessions and trades for material. The 
mad chase is after something that "has 
never been done before." When a com- 
pany has two star comedians, as Kalem 
has in Ham and Bud, the demand for 
something new is almost maddening, and 
the solution is found in poking fun at 
every known occupation of man. 

Practically every film comedian finds 
it necessary to follow the same tactics. 
Sometimes the chief fun-maker will go 
so far as to assume the costume of the 
trade or profession he is burlesquing, but 
more often not. How many times the 
poor police-force has been maligned is 
not on record, but it must run up into 
the millions. Ford Sterling, for instance, 
is, among other things, a well-recognized 
comedy police chief. 

Charlie Chaplin, of course, should not 
be left out in this collection. Since his 
departure from Keystone he has fired 
comedy howitzers at every trade imagin 



able. He 
has been ^a 
«**- dentist, a 

prize-fighter, 
a doctor, a stage-hand, a floor-walker, a 
fireman — but the catalog is too long. 
The human vocations that the late John 
Bunny insulted during his time were also 
without number. 

Of present-day film comedians, men- 
tion in this connection should be made 
of Roscoe Arbuckle, Chester Conklin, 
Charles Murray, of Keystone ; of Billie 
Ritchie, Billie Reeves, George Ovey. 
Burns and Stull, Riley Chamberlain, 
Frank Daniels, to say nothing of many 
others. Each week brings them on the 
screen in some new role common in our 
daily life. 

But if any championship prize is to be 
awarded in this regard, it should, with- 
out doubt, go to Ham and Bud, who have 
been before us for over two years, por- 
traying things that never happen in any 
one of the hundred or more vocations 
they have "taken up." The popularity 
of the Ham and Bud comedies is one 



61 



62 



OUR VERSATILE COMEDIANS 



of those indefinable things that defy ex- 
planation. Perhaps it is the good-natured 
way they turn things topsy-turvy in their 
conceptions of business life. If 
you should ask a so- 
ciety belle about them. 



Yet, these two "trades-people" deserve 
to stand in the spot-light, because, at 
times, they succeed in being really funny, 
which is a very difficult thing to do. 
Lloyd V. Hamilton and Bud 
Duncan — when their names 
are stretched out to the full 
eno;th — first excited the 




she would probably remark that "they 
aren't much to look at." The 
criticism is entirely justified. 
Ham is never well dressed ; in 
fact, he is a mussy-looking in- 
dividual, with a dilapidated derby, gen- 
erous clothing, huge feet, and a mushy 
mustache. Bud is no better — a diminu- 
tive individual who is a stranger to a 
white collar — a second fiddle to Ham and 
a human football. 



interest of photoplay fans when Ruth 
Roland and John Brennan were grinding 
out comedies for Kalem. The two jani- 
tors that slid around the wet floors in an 



OUR VERSATILE COMEDIANS 



63 



is wanted, it is 



office-building set forthwith blossomed 
out into Ham and Bud, ready to shoot 
holes into various jobs about which 
comedies were written for them. They 
soon became as well-known characters as 
"Mutt and Jeff," which incidentally 
speaks eloquently of the universal vogue 
of the Motion Picture. 

When a new comedy 
only necessary for the 
scenario writer to ask : 

"Have they been tra- 
peze performers?" 

A negative answer 
will result in another 
"vehicle," with Ham 
attempting to imitate 
the circus acrobat and fail- 
ing miserably, with Bud 
getting the worst of the 
bargain and a pretty girl 
thrown in for good meas- 
ure. It was some such 



BROT! 



of his strenuous pictures not so very long 
ago, he fell and broke his leg. The in- 
jury was more serious than at first 
thought, and Bud had to go it 

a lone f o r J^^ _ some t i m e. 

Xevertheless, 

the recent 

Ham and 
















ht< \ 


jP ^ ■ 








%&T 




m K-JP* 


^^£. 


m&'~--~--' '1MB 












Bud 



process as this 

Bud on the screen 



that brought 



Ham and 
as doctors, den- 
tists, printers, lion-trainers, band-players, 
street-cleaners, artists' models, art con- 
noisseurs, car conductors, army officers. 
and other jobs without end. 

"\\ nat next?" you will be tempted to 
ask. 

But Ham has nearly come to the end 
of his string, for, in the making of one 



come- 
dies have 
shown the 
same disre- 
gard for the 
personal comfort 
of the two insepar- 
ables and may be taken 
as typical of all produced by them. 

In "Millionaires by Mistake," Ham 
and Bud started as street-cleaners and 
then ventured forth into society. Ham's 
idea of appropriate evening dress was 
certainly weird, and he fell very readily 
for the vampire's wiles, but it wasn't long 
before he was back to manicuring boule- 
vards again. ''Ham, the Diver" was 
Bud Duncan's idea, and Ham had a rig- 
orous experience in a typical diver's suit. 
In "Ham and the Hermit's Daughter," 
the comedians played surveyors and 
seemed to enjoy it when assisted by a 
wavy-haired vounsr ladv-hermit. In 
"Ham, the Fortune-teller," the said in- 
dividual took charge of a gypsy tent and 
gathered in the shekels with the aid of 
the cards. 

Just a few more : In "Ham and the 
Masked Marvel," the comedian was an 



64 



OUR VERSATILE COMEDIANS 



absolute fiasco as a knight of the prize- 
ring. In "The Tank-town Troupe," the 
comedians were, for a time, the band, but 
it was, fortunately, the silent drama. In 
the same picture Bud was the trapeze 
artist aforesaid, while Ham performed 
some remarkable "lifting" stunts. In 
"Ham, the Lover," the burly comedian 
practiced some questionable tactics as a 
dueler, and, as Ham's second, Bud had 
no interest in the result either way. Just 
what would happen to the country if we 
had generals like Ham and Bud in "JHam 
Agrees with Sherman" is not difficult to 
predict, but, to judge only by their 
get-up, there were very few military 
proceedings in the drama. 

This, then, is a sample of the versatility 
required of our Moving Picture come- 
dians, who must be a combination of 
acrobat, actor, and human target. Ham 
and Bud have always made things hum 
at the Kalem Hollywood studio, and they 
are, in fact, the busiest persons about a 
place that teems with activity. A visit 
to watch them work is of much interest. 
It may be early in the morning before 
the carpenters have had time to put up 
the "set." But Ham and Bud are not 
idle; they are discussing how to get in 
something "that has never been done 
before." 

"You lift me high up in the air by one 
hand," you may hear Bud suggest, "and 
then kick me, and I'll fly straight out of 
the picture." 

Then the thing happens, and Bud, hav- 
ing invited punishment, takes it without 
wincing, merely picking himself up and 
rubbing his injured anatomy rather rue- 
fully. But something happened to the 
camera, or the film "buckled," or the 
comedians weren't satisfied. 

"That wasn't right. Let's do it over 
again." 

Bud isn't awfully enthusiastic, but he 
goes thru it, for he knows Ham's turn 
is coming soon, and maybe the smile of 
satisfaction that he registers on the screen 
has some feeling behind it, after all. 

Of course both Ham and Bud, in their 
extended picture career, have had some 
lively experiences which threatened life 
or limb, but, possessing apparently 
charmed lives, nothing serious happened 
until Ham broke his leg. There was one 



time when a truant officer stopped the 
company's work while outdoors, because 
Bud, in knickerbockers, looked as tho he 
should be in the little, red schoolhouse. 
Bud must have had a guilty conscience, 
and certainly the officer must have lacked 
spectacles, for Bud ran, and the truant 
officer chased the wayward "boy." The 
explanations were somewhat humiliating 
to the officer. 

When Ham was making scenes for 
"The Diver," San Diego Bay was se- 
lected as the marine location. It was 
intended to let him down only a few feet, 
but a cog slipped, and you cant convince 
Ham that he did not touch the bottom or 
that he was under the water less than 
four or five hours. 

Albert Edward Duncan — Bud's name 
on Sundays — really achieved a picture 
career when he was chased out of Mexico 
two years ago. He was born in Brook- 
lyn and educated at a military school. 
His father was a well-known ventrilo- 
quist, and the son naturally went on the 
stage. After appearing in vaudeville, he 
seemed to fit in perfectly as little Jeff in 
"Mutt and Jeff," as it was produced in 
the pictures. After that, for some un- 
explained reason, Bud went with a com- 
pany that took a voyage from San Fran- 
cisco to Mazatlan, Mexico, to take edu- 
cational pictures of the sea-life peculiar 
to the gulf of lower California. 

When Bud gets to reminiscing, he can 
tell some interesting things about this 
trip. The company made the voyage in 
a forty-foot yawl, arriving at Mazatlan 
in the midst of a nice little Mexican 
revolution. Sailing up the gulf to Guy- 
mas, they were stopped by the U. S. S. 
York town and put under navy orders on 
that ship. At Cerros Islands they re- 
mained in hiding for two days in the 
brush, and succeeded in getting photo- 
graphs of a fish-hawk's nest with its 
young. At Magdalena Bay they made a 
three-reel picture of the whaling in- 
dustry, and Bud started his comedy tricks 
again, when he fell overboard while the 
whale was being captured. Ultimately, 
things got so hot for the little party that 
they had to seek refuge on the U. S. S. 
Justin. Bud arrived later at Los Angeles 
and hooked up with Kalem to form a 
comedy team with Ham. 



, *2 : ~^ JM. 


B 


LiA^V ^,£^4--^*^ „ ***** ', 

EI ft X* 





DAVE KELEHER IN 'THE BABY AND THE BOSS" (THANHOUSER) 

Acting on the Street 

By ARTHUR HORNBLOW, JR. 



It is the ever-present duty of the Motion 
Picture player to do what is asked of 
him. Whether it be falling down a 
cliff, being run over by an automobile, 
or sliding down a drain-pipe with an 
armful of fair tho not light heroine, it's 
all in the day's work for the intrepid 
Thespian who has cast his lot where the 
movies grow. But of all the tasks that 
are his, there is one thafr towers above 
them all. That, indeed, is more filled 
with difficulties, obstacles and troubles 
than all the others put together ; and that 
is the seemingly simple "acting on the 
street." 

By the very nature of things, "ex- 
teriors" must be taken out-of-doors. 
When a scenario calls for a street, the 
stage carpenter cant lower drop No. 3 
and comply with the request. The proud 
realism of the movies demands a real 
street, a lively-looking street, a street of 



/ 



65 



precisely the nature the story requires. 
Perhaps this seems easy. Sometimes it 
is. In a rural story, the action of which 
may be laid in a jerk-water, no-stop-on- 
Sundays town, streets are readily acces- 
sible, and working on them is as simple 
a matter as one might wish for. But 
when big city streets are required, then 
does the director toss in wakeful nights, 
the actor grow grayer as the day ap- 
proaches, and the camera-man curse the 
fact that pictures were ever invented ! 

Have you ever seen a crowd gather at 
the first sound of fire-engines? Have 
you ever seen the small boys seemingly 
spring from the ground at the first sign 
of a fight? Have you ever seen, any- 
where, something unusual happen when 
there were many people in the vicinity? 
If so, your imagination will be aided in 
picturing what occurs when the movie- 
folk settle down in a busy spot to "shoot." 






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SCENE FROM ''GRIP OF EVIL" (BALBOA). JACKIE SAUNDERS, CENTER; 
H. O. STECHHAN FACING HER 



[It is to the credit of the art of the 
Motion Picture director that he generally 
manages to keep the curious away from 
his camera's eye. There is nothing more 
disillusionizing in a picture than sud- 
denly to see an alien face enter the scene 
and gaze, astounded and open-mouthed, 
towards the camera, and when working 
in a crowded place a director's every 
effort is devoted to avoiding just such 
calamities. 

The rubberneck contingent is as an- 
noying to the player as to the director. 
The latter's duty is to keep the curious 
away, far out of sight, so that by no 
possible chance will they interfere with 
the work. When there are several hun- 
dred hangers-on, with nothing much to 
do, in the vicinity, the enormity of this 
task is appreciable. But even this pales 
into insignificance when compared with 
the arduous duty of the actors them- 
selves. Theirs is the task to perform 
before sometimes huge and totally un- 
controlled throngs. And, as those 
throngs never quite know what it's all 
about, anyway, their conduct is usually 
as permeated with the happy-go-lucky 
mob spirit as is that of the boardwalk 
gangs at a Coney Island Mardi Gras. 
Comments that degenerate into jeers and 
insults are frequently the unhappy lot of 
the film players who have to do scenes 
in places where crowds grow like mush- 
rooms, and the misfortune of their situa- 



66 



tion rises proportionately with the senti- 
mental nature of the scene they are 
enacting. A crowd will sometimes fall 
into the spirit of a comedy scene and en- 
joy it just for itself; but when it comes 
to pathos, all the lower, derisive instincts 
of man seem to be aroused. Mob joy 
feeds fat on "soft stuff" ! 

The erudite souls who observe and 
write about crowds from the psycholog- 
ical standpoint might do well to cast an 
eye upon this comparatively new field for 
their studies. Certain is it that better 
demonstrations of the mob spirit Cannot 
be witnessed than when the movie-folk 
desert the studio for outside work in 
places where Philistines are wont to 
gather. The problem of just why a 
handful of people, who feel awed and 
privileged at being thus permitted a 
glimpse behind the screen, should de- 
velop quite the reverse attitude when it 
increases to twb handfuls, is respectfully 
submitted to any rising young psycholo- 
gist with a penchant for mobology. 

For the unfortunate player, especially 
be he inexperienced, every picture which 
calls for busy street scenes is a tragedy. 
The present writer attended the ''shoot- 
ing" of a few exterior scenes, recently, 
in which a well-known star of the legiti- 
mate stage was called upon, for the first 
time, to air his talents on the cold and 
inhospitable streets of New York City. 
The play was vaguely connected with 



THIS IS AN ARTIFICIAL STREET AND VILLAGE BUILT BY THOS. H. INCE (WHO STANDS 
IN THE FOREGROUND). IT WAS USED IN "CIVILIZATION" 




67 




THIS IS AN ARTIFICIAL STREET AND THE PEOPLE IN IT ARE ALL EXTRAS, HIRED FOR 

THE OCCASION 



the Civil War, inasmuch as the hero, 
clad in the most resplendent of uniforms, 
was required to bid a fond and lingering 
farewell to his heroine in front of her 
papa's home. When it is further ex- 
plained that the scenic director had 
chosen, to serve as the papa's home, 
an antebellum mansion in Washington 
Square, which location was doubtless as 
quiet as could be desired in the 'sixties," 
but which today, despite its literary rep- 
utation, is continually crowded with a 
motley rabble with rubberneck tenden- 
cies, it can be readily understood that by 
the time the camera was in place, and the 
actors run thru a "business" rehearsal, 
the cry ''Movies !" had spread and the 
tribe had gathered. The director cursed 
fate and made speed; the little heroine 
wrung her hands and looked doleful -in 
anticipation. The hero, alone, of the 
little group of film-folk, was undismayed. 
He would show this herd what art was ! 
If you have ever heard a small boy 
imitate a kiss — noisy, long-drawn-out 
and wet ; if you have ever been mocked 
and taunted at a moment when you least 
wanted to be ; if ever you have seen a 
crowd play the bully, cruel and sarcastic, 
but funny withal, you can imagine what 
happened when "action" was begun. 
Generally, pandemonium of this sort is 
started by some single spark of common 
interest or amusement which lifts the in- 



68 



dividuals out of themselves and makes 
out of the whole a mob with figuratively 
one mind and one voice. The bond which 
drew this particular crowd together re- 
sulted from the hero's make-up. Enor- 
mously fond of his handsome eyes, he 
had sought to accentuate them by unusu- 
ally heavy applications of the black pen- 
cil, and the result was his looking more 
like a pirate than a properly licensed 
soldier. As he advanced into the scene, 
a somewhat beery sot in the first row of 
spectators ejaculated, "Blesh my soul, 
it's Lizzie !" A great hoot went up from 
the assemblage, whose funny-bone had 
been tickled, and then started a series of 
heckling comments which could be guar- 
anteed to remove the starch from the 
stiffest self-esteem. The climax came 
when the kiss came. The air resounded 
with a dozen echoes and various other 
noises which are frequently considered 
appropriate by the hoi polloi for such 
occasions. The kiss was supposed to be 
fond and lingering. The hero lingered 
as long as he could under the circum- 
stances, and his expression upon comple- 
tion was anything but fond. And, to 
make matters worse, the heroine had re- 
ceived a large smudge of black on her 
forehead from the hero's eyebrows, and, 
as he gracefully descended the stairs, 
looking back at her after the manner of 
the movies, his sword caught in his legs 




LOYOLA O'CONNOR IN A CHILD OF THE PARIS STREETS 



and he tripped. Of course the whole 
scene had to be taken over again ; the 
ordeal thru . which the uninitiated hero 
had to pass had proved too much for even 
his art. Incidentally, when the scene 
was taken over, it was done in New Ro- 
chelle, with no one around but the birds. 
And in an interview which the hero re- 
cently accorded the press, he confessed 
that acting on the street wasn't the most 
desirable feature of picture work. And 
there isn't one of his screen-mates that 
doesn't agree with him. 

Sometimes, tho not often, a gathering 
crowd is utilized as part of a scene. In 
the popular serial, ''The Goddess," Miss 
Anita Stewart, in the title role, had to 
pass, mesmerized, garbed in flowing 
Grecian robes, thru the great Pennsyl- 
vania station in New York. It was, of 
course, quite natural that a crowd should 
follow her. Accordingly, a small crowd 
of about fifty extras was taken to the 
station to play the scene. When they 
began to film, every person in the station, 
except the employees who couldn't leave 
their posts, flocked forward to see the 
fun. As a result, the extras were as a 
drop in the bucket. Five or six hundred 
people followed Miss Stewart thru the 
station, yelling and laughing and tugging 
at her robe, while she, poor girl, having 



to be faithful to her supposedly mesmer- 
ized condition, had to proceed onward, 
looking neither to left nor right, and trust 
that at least some of her clothes would be 
spared. Meanwhile, outside the station, 
word had spread that Jess Willard, the 
champion fighter, was arriving from the 
scene of his victory over Johnson, and so 
many gathered on Seventh Avenue that 
when another scene was filmed outside 
the station the police reserves had to be 
called to quell the riot! 

It is becoming quite customary to 
utilize large volunteer crowds in street 
scenes, and not infrequently the crowds 
are used without their being aware of 
the fact. In ''An Alien," for example, 
the picture featuring George Beban in 
his famous "rose" story, several scenes 
were taken in the crowded districts of 
lower East New York by a rather in- 
genious method. A large truck wagon 
was driven thru the heart of the Ghetto, 
attracting no attention, for it was like 
hundreds of others that daily pass the 
same way. And thru the thronged and 
narrow sidewalks roamed Beban in his 
realistic Italian make-up, unnoticed by 
reason of his resemblance to the myriads 
who streamed along the same quarter. 
But the wagon and Beban kept close 
(Continued on page 160) 



69 



Popular Plays and Players 

You have not seen nor heard from our contributing poets in a long while ; that's 
our fault, not theirs. We have received hundreds of clever verses 'bout 
plays and players, but lack of space has forbidden our use of them. Needless 
to say, they were valuable, and we sent each one on to the player to whom it was 
indited. Our Limerick Department has usurped the place for praiseful verse, but 
occasionally we will publish a few pages of the bestest best. 



Comes a "first offense" from Leonard 
M. Hall, 1330 Beach Avenue, Lakewood, 
Ohio. If this is to be offensive, then 
have we read the dictionary wrong! 

Oft have I heard some rabid soul proclaim 
The glories of his patron movie queen ; 
Rave long and loud anent her "brow 
serene" ; 
Her pictured smile, eyes, hair, complexion — 

fame. 
I missed the thrill that greets the idol's 
name.; 
I lacked the joy of other fans I've seen 
Burn incense to some goddess of the screen ; 
That is — till dainty Edna Mayo came. 

Then felt I like some seeker, travel-worn. 
Who gains at last the object of his quest, 

And, banishing all thought of hardship borne, 
Feels but attainment's joy within his 
breast. 

No more do smitten friends arouse my scorn, 
For now, I humbly worship with the rest. 

Something else so old that it's new — 
an acrostic ! But this is an uncommonly 
good one, methinks, so here goes ! It is 
from "An Earle Williams Fan" : 

EARLE WILLIAMS. 
E arnest endeavor has made his name 

famous, 
Added to charm of both manner and face; 
R eally good acting, and not merely posing, 
L eads us to gladly accord him first place — 
Ever is Earle Williams first in the race! 

Work conscientious is shown in his pictures, 
I ntelligent study of plot and of pose ; 
L aying aside for a moment all prejudice, 
L et us admit 'twas by merit he rose. 
I n plays like "The Christian," and also 

"Love's Sunset," 
A gain, in "The Juggernaut," who will denv 
Manly appearance, and clean, wholesome 

action, 
Show in each film and delight every eye? 

Rose Rosenblum, address also ungiven 
(why are you so secretive about your- 
selves?), raises her voice in the multi- 
tude when she Chants Chaplin Can- 
tos ( ?) — but it is a voice — also verse 
—that has been heard. Wherefore : 

THE "CHARLIE CHAPLIN FAD." 

Oh, the world is raving mad 
'Bout another "latest fad," 



70 



And, of course, it's in a Motion Picture 
way ; 
For people, the world over, 
Think they surely are in clover 

When they're seeing Charlie Chaplin in a 
play. 
Eating is of no account ; 
If they have the right amount, 

The whole fam'ly goes to see a movie show — 
Not to see the lively Mary, 
Who is pretty as a fairy; 

It is Charlie Chaplin that they want, we 
know. 

Every movement that they see 
Causes all to yell with glee, 

For it's done in such a reg'lar Chaplin way ; 
All the young ones — old folks, too — 
Love to see what Charles can do : 

He can fill the saddest heart with feelings 
gay. 

There is laughter at his dress — 
. At 'most everything, I guess, 

From his crudely fitted shoes to his 
mustache ; 
So on all days, rain or shine, 
When they see a "Chaplin" sign, 

People go to see him — if they have the 
cash. 

Laughter sometimes seems too rare, 
But, when Charlie Chaplin's there, 
All who see him wear a smile for many 
days; 
So, for lots of this world's fun, 
We're indebted to this one — 

Charlie Chaplin, of the Moving Picture 
plays. 

Moses Rountree (University of North 
Carolina) thinks an immense lot of 
Pearl White. If you dont believe me, 
just glance below: 

TO MISS PEARL WHITE. 
I've searched the world to find a pearl 

That can with her compare ; 
But others gleam with duller beam, 

And none are quite so fair. 
Her smile defies the sun-kist skies, 

And they turn dark with shame; 
The stars of night creep out of sight, 

To see her eyes aflame. 
Of roseate hue her cheeks are, too, 

And golden is her hair ; 
With matchless grace, and winning face— 

A goddess-queen, I swear ! 
And when hope fades in gloomy shades 

Of feverish despair, 
Ah! then there beams, like radiant dreams, 

"My" Pearl, so bright and rare. 




MARGUERITE CLARK IN "SNOW WHITE" (FAMOUS PLAYERS) 



The Boy Who Couldn't Keep a Job 

An Evening's Chat with the Successful Failure— Edward Earle 



By PETER WADE 



1 could get no concep- 
tion of him from 
his voice over 
the phone ; the wires 
were crossed at the 
time, and it sound- 
ed like a cracked 
phonograph record 
— scolding, jump- 
ing and whining. 
But I managed to 
get his address, and 
that evening I stood 
in front of the desig- 
nated apartment in 
Bedford Park, a hilly 
suburb of New York. 
On either side of the 
h omey, modern 
apartment stood an ^ s 
ancient, granite jj| 
convent and a |fp 
Quaker-gray §| 
church of bygone 
days. The follow- 
ing lines from Byron 
popped into my head 

I stood in Venice, on the Bridge of Sighs 

A palace and a prison on each hand. 

"I think I know my man without see- 
ing him," I muttered— ''a high-pitched 
voice, and, judging by his surroundings, 
a cross between a nun and a Sunday- 
school superintendent. Me for a drab 
evening !" 

First actual contact with my prey shook 
my belief a little. There was Edward 
Earle, waiting in the doorway of his 
library, as I ascended the stairs, and, 
in a musical and boyish voice, giving me 
an invitation to "step right in." I was 
literally pulled into his abode, with the 
aid of a vigorous handshake, and, from 
every feature of his face — light-blue, 
sparkling eyes; crinkled, dimpled cheeks 
and grinning mouth — "Welcome to Our 
Home" expressed itself. Evert the one 




72 



gested luxurious hospitality. 
I was led to an easy-chair, offered a 
choice of cigarets, cigars, or pipe, and 
ordered to "hang my feet on the table." 
Under the spell of his boyish openness 
of manner, my preconceptions of Edward 
Earle were rudely shattered. 

The room itself was set in perfect 
taste. The few paintings and etchings, 
interspersed with trophies, books and 
bronzes, neither cluttered the eyesight nor 
gave the effect of pretension. And then 
my eyes came back to the half-humorous, 
half-sentimental mouth, with the twink- 
ling eyes that vouched for its expression, 
and above them a 'crop of rough-brushed, 
crinkled, boy-lustrous, blond hair. 

"I feel that we are good friends al- 
ready," I half-apologized, "so let us be- 
gin at the beginning. What did you do 
the first thing after you were born?" 



THE BOY WHO COULDN'T KEEP A JOB 



73 




Mr. Earle's lips 
twitched appreci- 
atively. "I'll have 
to wire my mother 
in Toronto/' he 
countered, ''for 
such early particu- 
lars ; but when I 
was eight years old 
I started in business. 
It was a newspaper route, 
and I was on the job at 
four A. m., disseminat- 
ing daily knowledge 
Ijl k to the area ways of 
Toronto. 
"In those days," 
he went on, prop- 
erly warming up 
to his subject, "bi- 
cycles were all the 
rage, and it was 
my greatest ambi- 
tion to possess one. 
So I gave up the 
P newspaper route 
■"* and became an ap- 
prentice in a bi- 
j£g* cycle repair shop. 
P? The hours were 
very long — we had 
bicycle joy-rides, too, 
you know — and I 
sometimes worked 
till early in the 
morning, mending 
damaged wheels. 
I earned my two- 
wheeled Pegasus 
||a, all right, and, 
^^ seated in the sad- 
dle of my prize, a 
sudden distaste 
came over me for 
further tinkering. 
C a n d y," c o n- 
fessed Edward 
Earle, "has al- 
w ays been a 
weakness of mine, 
and here is enough 
evidence to convict." 
He tapped his gold 
molar sign ific a n tl y . 
I took a job in a car 



74 



THE BOY WHO COULDN'T KEEP A JOB 



store, thereby coaxing my livelihood and 
my sweet tooth to be bedfellows. 

"When the down began to blossom on 
my upper lip, my great ambition was to 
own a department store, and soon I be- 
came a clerk in the stock-room of one — 
the tail that wagged the dog, as it were. 
I was lost in the shuffle — one among five 
hundred other cogs in the great institu- 
tion — and settled for life with the mag- 
nificent salary of three dollars per week. 
But you see," he explained, "while I had 
been considerable of a rolling-stone, it 
was ambition, as well as inclination, 
that made me roll, and I felt that I could 
gather no moss on three dollars per. At 
an auspicious moment I approached the 
superintendent of the department and 
suggested three dollars and twenty-five 
cents. Upon that slender coin we split, 
and I put on my coat, determined to let 
the department store go to ruination 
without me. 

"At this crucial period in my career," 
confided my host, "I was eighteen years 
of age, grown to manhood, a clean five 
feet nine, and tingling with resolve to 
better myself. The Valentine Stock 
Company was then forming in Toronto, 
and my eyes turned to the stage. About 
the easiest way to kill off a 'tenderfoot 
of the footlights' is to give him utility 
parts, especially in stock. Our hours 
were from nine in the morning to twelve 
at night, rehearsing our next week's per- 
formance and putting on our daily 
matinee and evening show. Then, too, 
there were the constant changes of cos- 
tume and make-up that a utility man is 
heir to. At the end of an overcrowded 
month I found six dollars in my weekly 
envelope and a large, tho superficial, 
knowledge of the stock stage in my 
cranium. 

"I managed to scrape together some 
twelve dollars, and decided to strike out 
for New York, hit or .miss-. I reached 
the Grand Central Station on a balmy 
morning, with a carpet-bag in one hand 
and fifty cents change hard-fisted in the 
other. I was about the best example 
of 'heck' actor that had struck the 
white lights in many moons. But, with 
the 'blind virtue' of a utility man, I made 
the circuit of the theaters, ready to pry 
loose an opening. At last, 'way out on 



the outskirts of Brooklyn, I landed in 
'The Dairy Farm,' a one-horse road 
show, and, seeing that I was young, 
husky and innocent, its manager under- 
studied me for every part in the cast, 
including the colored mammy, and, not 
strange to say, in the course of time 1 
played each and every one of the roles. 

"Then came a period — a bleak year, 
too — in which I toured the Southern tier 
in 'A Pair of Spectacles' with Tim 
Murphy. I played the part of a half- 
starved boy, which required no art at 
all, as I looked and felt it as well. 
But I felt that 'it was in me' and that 
better days were coming, and, with the 
opening of a new season, I played in 
support of Wright Lorrimer in the ill- 
starred 'Shepherd King.' At last I had 
filled a tiny niche on Broadway, and my 
joy was complete. After that I played 
in 'Sweet Kitty Bellairs' with Henrietta 
Crosman, and supported Mary Manner- 
ing in 'Glorious Betsy.' 

"You would think," Edward Earle 
suggested, as he stirred a most inviting 
looking rarebit, "that the devil of unrest 
would have been quite cast put of me by 
this time, but I forgot to mention that 
I could carry an air well, and sang as 
well as played the mandolin in strict 
privacy. Perhaps these slender accom- 
plishments set my desires toward musical- 
comedy. At any rate, it wasn't long be- 
fore I was singing lustily with Jimmy 
Powers in 'The Blue Moon.' After that 
came solos and duets (mixed with some 
applause) with Mary Cahill in 'The Boys 
and Betsy,' De Wolf Hopper in 'The 
Matinee Idol,' Ralph Herz in 'Dr. De 
Luxe,' and Clifford Crawford in 'The 
Quaker Girl.' 

"Moving Pictures were still in their 
dramatic infancy. I knew little or noth- 
ing about them, but what was more nat- 
ural than that, after my burst of song, I 
should seek the silent drama? I made 
my introduction to the Motion Pictures, 
strange to say, thru my voice. About 
three years ago the Edison Company were 
all worked up over their talking pictures, 
which, you no doubt remember, were a 
synchronization of the phonograph with 
the camera. I 'read my lines' and acted 
for Edison at night, and in the daytime, 
(Continued on page 162) 




'DUSTY" AND HIS PAL, "MONTY," WHO IS THREE-QUARTERS ARABIAN 

Stones That Are True 



As Others See Us 

By DUSTIN FARNUM 



Ihad been out on what is called the 
Kern County Land Company's hold- 
ings, in Kern County, with a Dr. 
Salsbury and a Mr. Whitaker, who was 
the head irrigation engineer for this con- 
cern, after geese and ducks. 

We had been out on the irrigation 
ditches for two days and two nights — 
nights we had spent sleeping in a hay- 
mow in an old barn ; consequently, I had 
not had a shave or combed my hair or 
washed my face in the two days, and 
was pretty well covered with mud, burs 
and everything else when I drove into 
Bakersfield on the way home. 

We stopped at Mr. Whitaker's home, 
unloaded his share of ducks and geese, 
and were out on the back porch hanging 
them up. Mr. Whitaker has a cook — a 
colored lady who weighs about two hun- 
dred and sixty-five pounds and is the 



75 



most ardent picture fan in Bakersfield. 
Whitaker afterwards told me that when 
she had five minutes to spare she would 
run around to a picture house and see 
whatever was going on there. 

While we were hanging up the ducks. 
Mr. Whitaker's little girl, of about nine 
years of age, came out, and Mr. Whit- 
aker, introducing her, said, ''Helen, this 
is Mr. Farnum — Mr. Dustin Farnum, 
whom you have seen in the pictures so 
often/' Out of the corner of my eye I 
saw the big, husky cook looking at me 
with a very stern expression. She went 
back to her work and then turned and 
looked me square in the face again, 
put both hands on her hips, and said : 
"Urn! urn ! that man aint no Dustin 
Farnum — no, sir! Dustin Farnum's a 
picture man — yes, sir!" Which proves 
that sometimes we are not what we seem. 



76 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



Her Give-Away Eyes 

By CLEO MADISON 



Our company was working down at 
San Pedro, one day, taking some 
scenes on the street near the wharf. 
We hadn't been there long when some 
little newsboys gathered around to watch 



aint you ?" I pleaded guilty to the charge. 
A little pause, and then he began again. 
"Say, was youse married in th' pitchers?" 
I nodded a quick assent. "Say, are youse 
reallv married?" Before I had time 




Photo by Carpenter 



CLEO MADISON 



us. After one of the scenes I was stand- 
ing by myself a little apart from the 
others, and two of the newsies edged up, 
little by little, until they were standing 
in front of me. After they had duly 
inspected me from every point and angle, 
Newsboy Number One mustered up 
courage to say, "You're Cleo Madison, 



to answer, Number Two nudged his 
rival and piped up, scornfully : 

"Naw; 'course she aint." 

Number One turned on him with, 
"How do you know ?" The answer came 
with no hesitation : 

"Aw, shucks ! I can tell by her eyes 
she aint married !" 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



77 



Gay Plumage 

By MARY FULLER 



Birds have their molting" seasons twice 
a year, I believe, but picture stars 
change their plumage more often — 
every five weeks or less, according to the 
length of the picture — and these gay 
feathers, once used, are seldom seen 




MARY FULLER 

again on the screen, for duplication of 
costumes is remarked and commented on 
by the "fans." 

"What becomes of all scenic investiture 
of the photoplay actress after the initial 
display? — all the multitudinous hats and 
gowns, peignoirs and cloaks? Where the 
"heiress frocks," the serviceable working 
clothes of the "stenographer," or the glit- 
tering gauds of the demi-mondaine ? 
Where the sunbonnets of Susan and frou- 



frous of frolicsome Flora? I will tell 
you. 

So many, many letters come in my 
voluminous daily mail — letters from 
South, from East and West, from high- 
school fan, from spinster, from factory 
girl — asking the same question, "What 
do you do w r ith your movie clothes ? Will 
you send something to me ?" — as a souve- 
nir, as a present, or because of necessity 
in straitened circumstances — so many 
of these requests asking an answer, 
that I would like to give a wholesale 
rejoinder as to the disposition of my 
wardrobe — a wardrobe which grows 
and overflows, into racks of hangers, 
boxes, shelves, drawers, trunks, et 
cetera. When one seldom repeats 
costumes and plays a great variety 
of roles, an alarming amount of big 
things and little things accumulates. 
"Please send me that striped red- 
and- white blazer that you wore in the 

tandem scene of the picture," 

writes one observant devotee, picking 
out of my wardrobe a delectable Gid- 
ding's sport-coat which I myself am 
rather fond of. 

"I would like the sequin gown in the 
picture," writes another, wha evi- 
dently has views of cotillion conquests 
before her. 

"Any little thing will do," comes from 
Butte, Montana. "The black riding-suit, 
and a velvet afternoon gown, and a hat 
or two is really all I need." 

Or, "Couldn't you send me some serge 
dresses for office wear and a pair of 
evening .slippers ?" et cetera, et cetera. 

I do not quote these requests in any 
levity of spirit, because I am very glad 
to have my girl friends of the screen turn 
to me for help, and many of these I can 
take care of, sending what I think will 
suit them according to their measure- 
ments and coloring as described in their 
letter; but, of course, all applicants can- 
not receive a favorable reply for one of 
several reasons, chief among which is 
(and this is what I started out to tell you 
about) my rummage sale. 

Yes, every two years I have a delicious, 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



delightful rummage sale, where every 
one at the studio, from actors, actresses, 
et cetera, to factory girls and office boys, 
is invited and comes crowding into my 
dressing-rooms ; and I stand on a chair 
and auction off things — frocks and 
cloaks, suits and shoes, hats and gloves, 
and blouses, and furs, and everything — 
wonderful values at next-to-nothing 
prices, and some have never been worn 
at all; and a friendly girl assistant, or 
my maid, makes change for me ; and the 
heap of quarters, and dollars, and dimes, 
and five dollars, and tens and twenties 
piles up on my dressing-table, or in an old 
hat; and every one is talking at once and 
exclaiming on the bargains they have 
bought ; and an outer fringe to the circle 
of buyers is a friendly, grinning audience 
that plunges in now and then to bid for 
"A silk smock going at $2— $2.25— $2.50 
-—$2.75— $5. Sold for $5; here's your 
change. Hattie, wrap this up for 

Miss . Green velvet, evening 

cloak, Fifth Avenue style ; who will bid? 
Ten dollars— going at $10 " 

"Oh, you promised that to me yester- 
day for five dollars ; I need it so badly." 

"Oh, did I? All right; sold for $5. 
Wonderful value !" 

Ten pairs of silk stockings sold for $1 
the bunch; silk shirt-waists for 50c, in 
perfect condition. Here is a $75 suit 
sold for $7, and a $55 hat for $3. 

"Oh, tell Miss So-and-So to come back. 
Here is just what she wants in a neg- 
ligee for $2 — lace and silk — hurry !" 

"That suit will fit my wife. How 
much?" 

"Four dollars." 

"A bargain ; Fll take it." 

"It's yours. Hattie, some change for 
Mr. ." 

And so it goes. Heaps and heaps of 
fun for me, and a wonderful help to 
studio girls, who cant afford to pay Fifth 
Avenue prices for the . garments which 
are sold at my auction for a song — and 
go like hot cakes. It is this part of it — 
the philanthropic side — that appeals to 
me most. And, of course, it helps reduce 
my excess baggage, which, with six 
trunks and a big window-box full, is no 
inconsiderable item. 

One girl bought ten hats, all distinc- 
tive, fresh and astonishingly low in 




Copyright Martsook 



BLANCHE SWEET 



STORIES THAT ARE TRUE 



79 



price. Some hats I sold as low as five 
cents, which is, of course, laughable, as 
I intended it to be, to keep the crowd 
effervescing. And yet, with the very 
low prices, I made over two hundred 
dollars on my last rummage sale, which 
is somewhat of a gauge of the innumer- 
able things offered. Everything was 
sold, and while I received not one-fifth 
of its original price for an article, yet 
the fun of it, and the joy of it, and the 
clearance of surplus, makes it very much 



worth while. And the buyers, humming 
away like busy bees laden, or in the thick 
of bidding, enjoy it, too. I wish I had 
a picture to give you of me on the chair 
auctioning off in the midst of a rush of 
bidders, but, alas ! there is none, for 
during the three days' sale I was too 
busy to think of a photograph for the 
occasion, and besides, this is a true story, 
not a press agent's yarn. 

So, at my next auction, you are all 
cordially invited. 



My Undramatic Sneeze 

By BLANCHE SWEET 



I have heard of disastrous sneezes — of 
burglars concealed under the bed 
or in a closet, waiting for some one 
to retire or leave the room, being sud- 
denly seized with a sternutatory desire 
and having their plans entirely discon- 
certed; and I have been sitting in a the- 
ater, watching, w i 'th bated breath, a 
wonderfully dramatic climax, only to be 
brought unceremoniously to earth by a 
violent sneeze from the tragedy queen- 
but never before have I heard of an en- 
tire company of players being held up 
for a whole day because of a sneeze. 

In one scene of my picture, "The 
Silent Partner," I carefully and cau- 
tiously open a door, close it behind me, 
and advance into the room just as my 
employer is about to end his life. It is 



a very tragic moment and any false move 
would ruin the scene. Just as I opened 
the door in the final rehearsal, I sneezed. 
The door escaped from my grasp, swung 
back against a stand, knocking over a 
vase, which broke into a hundred pieces 
as it fell. This was the first scene taken 
that morning, but not the first scene in 
which the vase had been used ; conse- 
quently, a delegation from the property- 
room was immediately sent out to dupli- 
cate the vase. The search over the city 
occupied the entire day, while the com-, 
pany enjoyed a holiday. To leave the 
sneeze in the picture was impossible — 
occurring, as it did, in the midst of so 
dramatic a scene — so there was nothing 
to do but suspend all operations until 
another vase could be secured. 




x£ v^ "s^ 

The Passing 

By M. M. MURPHY 

hey do not die, the folk upon the screen. 
When they have "shuffled off this mortal coil"; 

Were life but mortal days, what object then 
In vain endeavors, strife, in endless toil? 

They live, they love, they hope, perchance they dream, 
And thru the myriad dramas they reflect 

Upon our lives the joy we've yet to glean, 
Or, having gleaned, 'twere then a retrospect 

They shift the load from off our hearts the while, 
We love with them, we smile, we sigh, we feel; 

We care not that they only hours beguile — 
We fancy life a never-ending reel. 

Then can they die — the folk of whom we're fond? 

They "pass" as heroes in the tales of old; 
Their semblance drifts unto a Great Beyond — 

Their spirits help our life-reels to unfold. 



IRENE FE.WVICK 




A Girl Like That 

(Famous Players) 

By EDWIN M. LA ROCHE 



T 



wo-FrFTY meld ; fifty to go," drawled 
Bill Whipple. 

"It's yours," snarled old Gor- 
don. "Nell, take the curse off the cards, 
wont you? And cough up six iron men 
for Bill." 

The girl dropped a half-mended sock 
and explored the deep pocket of her 
apron. She tossed a slim roll of bills on 
the table. 

"That's the last of it, pa," she said — 
"honest money, too." 

Old Gordon's fleshless frame shook with 
a spasm of coughing. "I'm thru with 
you," he threatened feebly — "thru with a 
hive of drone bees." 

Silence fell among the three card- 
players, while the girl watched them 
alertly. 

"Things aint as they was in your day, 
Bill," defended Joe Dunham, the fancy 
"dip ;" "and you cant crack a crib as easy 



81 



as you can a nut. There's the time-clock, 
and " 

"You fellers make me sick!" exploded 
the old cracksman. "You've done a good 
day's work if you snatch a pocketbook 
from a kid or lift a watch from a 
come-on." 

Bill Y\ nipple laughed uneasily. "The 
crook business has changed, Jake." he 
said, "and it takes brains to plant a lay 
and pull off a job nowadays." 

Joe leaned over the table, his eyes shin- 
ing, a faint color in his pallid cheeks. 
"I'll put it to you straight, Jake," he 
cried — "seeing as Bill aint got the guts. 
You know, you're a lunger and may croak 
any day — down and out, too — and haven't 
wised your girl how to glim. Who's 
going to look out for her when " 

"That's enough, Joe ; you said it," par- 
ried the old man feebly. "I got a sort of 
hunch that maybe she'd go straight." 



82 



A GIRL LIKE THAT 



"Listen !" exploded Bill. "Cut out the 
sob stuff and I'll tell you what's in the 
cards. Nell's a decent-acting girl and a 
dandy bookkeeper. All right? I've 
scouted a heck bank that's looking for 
a ledger-slinger. The job is just waiting 
for Nell. All she has got to do is board 
with the minister, keep her books — 
straight, mind you — and when Joe and I 
give the word, pass the combination of 
the vault on to us. After that we'll do 
the get-away, and it's you for fifty-fifty." 

Old Gordon's face was a study in mixed 
passions. Below the money-glitter in 
his pale eyes, the mouth twitched and 
softened. 

"I'm the only old granny she 
knows," he mumbled, half to himself, '* 
"and she still talks baby-talk to ML 
me, like as if I was her ma. Get 
her the job," he said, with a rising M 
voice ; "it will do her good to get M 
away from us, but to h — 11 with IB 
the combination!" 

"Give me your mitt on that," 
said Bill, grasping Jake's hand ; 
"keepin' company with crooks ] 
aint her quality." 

Old Gordon's head nodded 
feebly over his collarless shirt- 
bosom, and Nell and Joe lifted him 
to his feet and guided his uncer- 
tain steps to an adjoining bedroom. 

The door had no sooner closed upon 
the ex-cracksman than Bill faced the 
girl. 

"You see," he cried fiercely 
"how long he's got to Jive in a 
rotten tenement. A year in the 
mountains would "keep him 
going, and you stand by and 
let him croak on your hands." 

"I'd do anything to save him," 
she said hoarsely. 

"Then take the job. In two months 
the farmers' crop money begins to come 
in, and the vault will be stuffed to the 
doors. Remember, that little combination 
of figures saves old Jake's life !" 

The girl's eyes searched his untrust- 
fully. . "I'll do it," she said ; "but if you 
let him know that I'm not going straight, 
I'll quit." 

"Trust me, girlie," laughed the vic- 
torious Bill. "I wouldn't be such a 
fool." 



It seemed an endless train- journey to 
the girl, as she lay back and watched the 
lush pastures and waving corn thru half- 
closed eyes. She had left old Jake in the 
care of a motherly Irishwoman, and she 
knew that Bill and Joe would look out 
for his comforts as long as she reported 
progress. After that, if anything went 
wrong— well, she would try to get back 
to him. The Reverend Isaiah Singleton 



met her at 
drove her 



the station and 
sedately to the 




THE CASHIER WAS INDIFFERENT T( 

parsonage. From the very first peep at 
Greenacres she knew that she was go- 
ing to fall in love with it. There were 
a few stores near the station and a few 
little weather-worn cottages, smothered 
in honeysuckle, but these were only the 
gateway to the village green that lay 
up the road. It was all as quaint and 
spick as a toy village carved and set up 
by a Black Forest wood-carver. The 
double row of elms, the whitewashed 
cottages, the prim beds of flowers, and 



A GIRL LIKE THAT 



83 



even the snug little, ivy-covered bank, 
were fit to be picked up and hugged. 

She wished that old Jake could be one 
of the silver-haired old men, smoking on 
his tiny porch, and she his obscure 
handmaiden, busy among the rose-bushes. 




VILLAGE CHARMS 



CHARMERS 



"This is the parsonage," said the min- 
ister, drawing up before a two-story 
brick house with green shutters, "and 
permit me to introduce my boarder, Mr. 
Hoadley, the cashier of our bank." 

The girl saw a tall and slender young 
man on the porch unfurl his long legs 
and bow to her confusedly. She noticed 
the black, almost clerical clothes, and his 
mild eyes framed in tortoise-shell glasses. 

"Miss OToole, the new bookkeeper 
for the bank," she explained. 



"I'm awfully g-glad" — he stammered — 
"that is, the bank is glad you've come. 
Can I help carry your trunk upstairs?" 

Xell smiled reassuringly and followed 
the procession of the Reverend Isaiah 
Singleton, the cashier, and her heaving 
trunk. It was deposited, after sundry 
puffs and groans, in front of the sweetest 
little, chintz-curtained, sunny- windowed 
room she had ever dreamt of. 

She flew around it, humming to her- 
self, to the accompaniment of measured 
words on the porch below. Nell nipped 
a summer frock from her trunk and 
stopped to listen. The cashier was tell- 
ing his landlord and spiritual adviser 
about the latest success in rose culture. 

"A Marechal Niel," he affirmed— "a 
perfect beauty. I pruned it back to the 
main forks last winter, bedded it with 
straw, and sprayed it with whale-oil all 
spring." 

It suddenly came over the girl that she 
was now in an utterly different world. 
Here were men who spoke her language, 
after a fashion, and who wore pants and 
neckties ; outside of that they might have 
been birds or beasts, as far as their like- 
ness to Joe and Bill was concerned. 

Presently, dressed in a simple, white 
frock, with her sunny hair caught up 
with a ribbon, she went below and joined 
the cashier on the porch. 

He was visibly embarrassed at being 
with her alone. 

"I heard you speaking of roses," she 
said. "You are fond of them?" 

He brightened perceptibly. "There 
isn't much to do in Greenacres," he con- 
fided, "and you've got to have a hobby 
of some sort. When I was younger, I 
was in the hose company and was fond 
of boxing, but now I've taken to roses." 

She appraised the slightly grayed hair, 
the smooth cheeks and clear, studious 
eyes. He might be thirty, forty, even 
fifty. 

"Would you like to see my Marechal 
Niel?" he asked timidly. 
. She nodded vigorously, and the} 
walked across a path in the green. On 
the way he explained that the rose-bush 
was in his Aunt Jennie's garden, and that 
she was blind, but could distinguish each 
rose by its scent. "She has a finer ap- 
preciation of them than I have," he 



-- i 



84 



A GIRL LIKE THAT 



added, "so for several years I have kept 
adding to her collection." 

They stopped in front of one of the 
little; snow-drifty cottages, and he opened 
the gate-latch for her. The house, set 
back some thirty feet from the street, 
was literally bedded in roses. Jacque- 
minots, pale tea-roses, yellow Austrians, 
rambling Ayrshires, were plotted in beds 
or climbed the posts and lattices. 

The riot of soft colors sprang to the 
girl's cheeks. "And did you do all this," 
she asked, "for a blind woman?" 

The cashier winced, and she was sorry 
she had spoken. He led her proudly to- 
ward his favorite bush. 

"This is my Niel," he said — "the only 
one in the county." 

The morning dew was still on the deli- 
cate buds, and one royal, red blossom 
stared up, open-eyed, at her. 

"It is beautiful!" she said awesomely — 
"the gift of a prince to his bride !" 

She thought she heard him sigh back 
of her. "Are you coming to the bank to- 
day?" he asked. "We open again at one, 
you know." 

The colors in the dream-garden danced 
before the girl's eyes. Figures in serried 
columns seemed to fleck the air, and, 
after a while, several of them joined to- 
gether on a white slip of paper which a 
man's hand held before her. 

She closed her eyes. The figures were 
gone, but the hand that had held them 
was flicking a bug from the rose-bush. 

"I guess I wont report today," she 
said faintly ; "I've got to get my things to 
rights." 

That night Nell sat in her room and 
dashed off a note to Bill Whipple. It 
ran: 

I've met the cashier already, and he's a 
scream. Nuts on rose-bushes! If I take 
up rose-gardening, the combination's mine. 
Expect an early strike. 

She awoke the next morning bright 
and early and lay in her swan's-feather 
bed, listening to the far-off scolding of a 
guinea-hen. At seven o'clock she ate a 
delicious breakfast, and, after a fitting 
blessing, the Reverend Mr. Singleton told 
her that Tom Hoadley always ate his 
morning meal at six sharp — to steal a 
couple of early hours for his roses. 



As she walked to the bank, Nell found 
all of very old and very young Green- 
acres on their porches. She wondered if 
she were late and if there were any other 
young people in the village. 

At the bank she found that the books 
were absurdly simple — a couple of hun- 
dred accounts posted in an old-fashioned 
ledger. 

If the cashier and bookkeeper were 
honest, well and good ; if not, they could 
walk off with everything but the furni- 
ture. She meant to speak to Mr. Hoadley 
about it. 

Presently he entered, a bit flushed and 
looking much younger than the day be- 
fore. His blue eyes fairly beamed at her 
thru the heavy glasses. 

Nell asked him to spare her a few mo- 
ments and explained the nai'veness of the 
bank's bookkeeping system. 

"Why, bless you," the cashier said, after 
her learned discourse, "no one ever sees 
them but you and I. The president is a 
very venerable, retired farmer and comes 
to the bank only on dividend clays." 

"Who is responsible, then ?" she asked, 
rather tartly. 

"Somebody once asked Napoleon," the 
cashier explained, "what was the law on 
a grave question, and he said, 'The law? 
/ am the law!' I guess I'm the bank." 

Her respect for him instantly rose, but 
she marveled at his simplicity. "Very 
well, Mr. Bank," she suggested ; "see that 
you dont go broke." 

After that they got on swimmingly. If 
Tom Hoadley was a benighted book- 
keeper, he was an astute banker and a 
bond of influence with his farmer ae- 
positors. He was patient/broad-minded, 
generous and evert humorous in a timid 
sort of way. 

She could not help but admire him — a 
man who pursued and guarded the dol- 
lars of others, and whose hobby was rose- 
gardening for a blind aunt. He was a 
plodding, cheerful monument of self-sac- 
rifice and did not know it. His greatest 
thrill was the touch of a sightless old 
lady's hand. 

One morning she surprised herself by 
getting up with the sun and by walking 
over to Aunt Elvira's garden. The 
cashier's tall shape was doubled-up 
among his fragile treasures. 



A GIRL LIKE THAT 



85 



"I've come over to rob you,'' she said, 
"of a share of your fun." 

Hoadley fairly shivered with pleasure. 
His attitude toward her had always been 
deeply respectful or precise, after the 
manner of a counting-house. 

Now he was emboldened to thrust a 
border-edger into her hands and to admit 
her into the privacy of his hobby. They 



She had not written to Bill Whipple 
in weeks. She kept putting it off and 
putting it off, with a gulp in her throat, 
as she blew out her lamp each night. 

Then, one rain-driven day, Hoadley 
came to her at her desk and handed her 
the combination to the vault-lock. She 
saw his hand stretched toward her and 
the row of figures, just as before she 




GOD BLESS HER FOR WANTING TO BE HAPPY 



worked the black, rich glebe for an hour, 
the silence of content between them. 

And that was the beginning of their 
labor of love together in Aunt Elvira's 
"vineyard." Cool, sun-swathed morn- 
ings followed each other with delicious 
regularity, and their breakfasts were the 
demolishments of hired hands. 

The Reverend Isaiah Singleton's atti- 
tude changed perceptibly toward her. He 
smiled with a bless-you-my-children 
grimace as they bent over the food. 



had visioned them in the rose-garden. 

"But I dont want it," she pleaded, 
shutting her eyes tight. "Please take it 
away." 

"I may be sick some day. Miss 
O'Toole" — the words were very precise 
— "and in twenty years I've never had a 
confidante." 

She shivered slightly, for the first time, 
at the sound of her assumed name. 

"But I want you to have it," the voice 
above her went on ; "I want vou to feel 



86 



A GIRL LIKE THAT 



that the bank is part of you — is safe in 
vour hands." 

She looked up quickly and he turned 
very red. She saw that his hands were 
gripping the sides of her desk firmly and 
that the paper had fluttered down be- 
tween them. 

The girl moaned softly and her head 
slipped forward on her arms. 

"Nell! Nell!" he cried pitifully; "dont 
do that; dont let me unnerve you." 

"I was thinking," she said slowly, be- 
tween clenched teeth, "of the first day in 
the rose-garden — I saw you hand me the 
figures then. But I felt differently. 

I " 

She felt the caressing touch of his 

hand on her head and sobbed softly. 
And yet there was a glory in the thing. 
She knew that her bared heart was un- 
ashamed in the presence of his nobility. 

Back in the murky tenement, old Gor- 
don had thriven and grown stronger 
under the care of the good-hearted Irish- 
woman and his two young pals. He 
never suspected that Bill and Joe were 
fattening the turkey, as represented by 
himself, for a prize killing. 

As the weeks wore by and no further 
letters came from Nell, Bill began to 
grow uneasy. His suspicions began to 
take root, and one day he took the train 
down to Greenacres and looked the 
ground over. 

Late that night he and Joe held a hur- 
ried consultation in the back room of a 
crooks' hang-out. 

"I tell you," cried Bill, "she's double- 
crossed us ! Nell's grown soft on the 
cashier and is waiting her chance to 
frame us up !"• 

"Let's get Jake out of bed," advised 
Joe, "and down here. Stick a gun into 
his ribs and you'll find that he's standing 
in with her." 

Stung to fury by their discovery, the 
pair jumped into a taxi and were whirled 
to old Gordon's tenement. It was a raw, 
drizzling night, past midnight, but they 
had no heart-wrenchings about getting 
the old man out of bed and hustling him 
into the cab. 

Once in the dive's back room again, 
they locked the door and faced the ex- 
cracksman. "Nell's gone back on us," 



announced Bill, grimly. "She's going 
straight and is ready to frame us up." 

"She might be going straight," said 
old Gordon, firmly, "but she'll never play 
you double — she aint built that way." 

"Jake Gordon," said Bill, standing over 
the sunken old man, "We got you down 
here to give you a shake-down and make 
you eat your words. Here's a pen and 
paper ; write a note to Nell, ordering her 
to deliver the combination at once !" 

Old Gordon studied the eyes of his 
two young pals. What he saw made him 
shiver and sink deeper into his chair. 
They were ready to murder him, that he 
knew. 

"I cant do it, boys," he said slowly, as 
tho pronouncing his own sentence. "God 
bless her for going straight and wanting 
to be happy !" 

The silence of a dreadful doom fell 
upon the room. The two glanced at each 
other, and suddenly Joe's hands shot 
forward, pinioning old Gordon's arms to 
his sides. Then Bill slid his gun up un- 
der the old man's vest and pulled the 
trigger. 

Old Gordon sank still deeper into his 
chair. His grizzled head bent forward. 
The pair leaned over him to catch his 
muttered words : "God bless her for want- 
ing to be happy." 

"Stick the gun in his hand and beat 
it!" whispered Bill. "We got to show 
ourselves in some live joint until tomor- 
row night's train for Greenacres." 

The day following her father's mur- 
der Nell had made up her mind to quit 
her dream village. She knew that she 
was not fit to give herself to Tom Hoad- 
ley and that he stood ready to ask her 
the dear question. 

All that day she quietly put her books 
in order, and, after supper, retired to her 
room and began to pack her trunk. 

Presently she heard obsequious foot- 
steps, and the Reverend Isaiah's gentle 
knock sounded on her door. 

"There are two gentlemen below who 
wish to see you," he announced. 

She gave some sort of reply and shiv- 
ered into a dressing-sack. Her intuition 
told her that the long-delayed reckoning 
had come. 

Under the shaded- glow of the living- 



A GIRL LIKE THAT 



87 



room lamp Nell found Bill and Joe wait- 
ing for her. She came forward, without 
hesitation, and shook hands with them. 

"Well ?" A world of words crowded 
into Bill's brief question. 

"I just couldn't do it," she said simply. 
"It's like robbing a child. If you had 
only lived with these people — worked 
with them, knew them — you wouldn't 
have the heart to hurt anv of them." 



the door. Presently Bill turned, half- 
crouching, toward her. 

"It's too early to do anything," he said. 
"Leave the door unlocked and let us in 
at one o'clock." 

Then she nodded quickly in assent and 
knew that the inevitable must happen. 
The house was perfectly quiet and the 
minister had retired. In three hours they 
would be back and she must do this thing 
to save her father. 

Under the lamp her eyes caught sight 




"I VE GOT THE COMBINATION AND THE BANK KEYS 



Joe coughed sympathetically, but Bill 
drew her close under the light. 

"Is that all you've got to say?" he 
asked with a low intensity. "Are you 
playing square? 'Any of them' you say. 
Isn't there another story to tell about the 
cashier?" 

She faced him with wide, frightened 
eyes, square in the lamp-light. 

"Nothing more," she said. "Now, 
please let me go." 

She gasped with surprise as both men 
reached for their hats and walked toward 



of a folded newspaper, and she picked it 
up unconsciously. There, in bold head- 
lines, her fascinated eyes read the details 
of the suicide by shooting of the notori- 
ous ex-cracksman, Jake Gordon. At the 
end of the story — a mere casual remark — 
was the information that two of his young 
crook-pals had been seen with him earlier 
in the evening. 

Instantly the truth flashed across Nell's 
mind. Her agonized brain projected a 
vivid Moving Picture of the whole grew- 
some affair before her eves. Her father 



88 



A GIRL LIKE THAT 



had gone to his death trying to shield her 
— that much she knew ! 

A burning hatred for the murderers 
flooded her heart to the bursting point. 
She must sacrifice herself and act at once. 

After what seemed a tortured hour, 
she got Tom Hoadley on the telephone. 
He was spending a golden evening frat- 
ernizing with his old friends of the hose 
company. The insane words that winged 
over the midnight wire to him almost 
crumpled him up in his tracks. 

"They are 
going to rob 
the bank," 
she said, 
"atone 




"I LL 



THERE 



PITY 



I pave it. I'll be 



o clock. Combination- 
there — God pity me " 

Nell hurried into some heavy clothes 
and waited, shivering, in her room. Her 
ears were attuned to catch the slightest 
sound. 

Presently a slight foot-scrape sounded 
on the porch, and she knew that Bill and 
Joe had returned. In an instant she had 
sprung down the stairs and joined them. 
They could not see the horror in her eyes, 
but her quick, gasping words gave them 
the needed answer. 

"I've got the combination and the bank 
keys. Quick! let us get on the job!" 



The sinister group, in dark clothes, 
stole out under the shadows of the elms 
and approached the bank building. It 
lay shrouded in darkness — the security of 
twenty years of undisturbed slumber. 

Bill made a rapid circle of the building 
and nodded to Nell to unlock the doors. 
With just the faintest tinkle, as the key 
caught the tumblers, the doors opened 
part way and the three edged inside. 
The girl slipped the telltale slip of 
paper into Bill's hand and guided him 
thru the stone-black passageway to 
the vault-room. 

There came a long moment when she 
held her breath and the hot tears 
sprang to her eyes. Then the 
click-click of the tumblers in 
the vault-lock told her that 
Bill was at work. 
Suddenly some one sprang 
back of her and pushed the 
door shut, turning the key 
sharply in the lock. 
"What in h — 11!" growled 
Bill. 

The answer came in a siz- 
zling, tiny spark from one 
corner of the room that rap- 
idly grew to the power of a 
calcium light. Some one had 
lit a slow-fire rocket. 
Nell's scream first broke, the 
silence. There, in the cor- 
ner of the room, stood Tom 
Hoadley, crouched to spring 
upon Bill, who stood with 
eveled gun back of the open 
vault-door. 

She saw the cashier make 
his flying leap, the quick jet 
from Bill's gun, and then a 
blow whirled the room into 
blackness as she sank to the floor. 

Hours — it might have been years — 
afterward Nell opened her eyes in the 
little chintz- windowed room that she had 
learnt to love. The Reverend Isaiah 
Singleton stood at her bedside in an atti- 
tude of prayer. 

"Have I been here long?" she asked 
faintly. "And do you usually pray for 
me to wake up?" 

The Reverend Isaiah blushed deeply 
and stole from the virginal room. Other 
footsteps — springing ones — took the place 



of flame 
crashing 



A GIRL LIKE THAT 



89 



of his on the stairs. Nell rubbed her 
eyes smartly. They must be lying to her ; 
for there, with his eyes beaming brightly 
bacljc of his glasses, stood Tom Hoadley. 

"Why is every one so interested in my 
getting up?" she demanded. 

Tom gulped for an answer. "It's 'way 



"Why, that's terrible, Mr. Hoadley!" 
she cried. "Who do you think the thief 
was?" she asked. 

"A dozen guesses." 

She shook her head in despair. 

"Aunt Elvira! When she heard that 
vou had — er — hurt your head in the 




WHY AND FOR WHOM HIS ROSES HAD GROWN' 



past time," he said finallv, "for our work 
in the rose-garden, and the bank's doors 
are open." 

She lay back, staring, trying to piece 
her little world together. 

"Besides that," he went on, after a 
silence, "this morning I went to the 
Marechal Kiel and found that all his 
roses had disappeared." 



bank — er — working after hours, she 
groped her way out to the garden and 
plucked old Kiel as naked as a fowl." 

He laid the fragrant roses by her on 
the pillow and took her hand softly in his. 

Xell understood. His great heart quick- 
ened hers. She buried her cheeks in the 
blossoms and kist the dew from the 
bloom. 



A gently blazing fire upon the hearth, 
A cushioned chair, an oft-read book or 
two, 

A mellow pipe to aid me in my dreams, 
Sweetheart, of vou. 



Before and After 

By HUGH HOLBROOK 

These things once brought contentment to 
my soul, 

But nevermore such solitude I'll woo. 
When I can go to movieland each night 

And dream with vou. 






it 



Photo by II. Tarr 



90 



My Lady o' 
the Dimples 

She Wanted to Play Seri- 
ous Roles — But Her 
Dimples Said 

Her Nay! 

When Lillian 
Walker's merry 
smile, w i t h its 
generous display of white 
teeth and two deep dim- 
ples, bubbled over the 
footlights from the ranks 
of Gus Edwards' ''School 
Boys and Girls," her for- 
tune was made. From 
there to pictures was an 
easy step — made still 
easier by those self-same 
dimples, aided and abetted 
by a merry twinkle in 
eyes of cerulean blue. 

So when she went to 
Vitagraph she was as- 
signed to a comedy direc- 
tor. For a long, long 
time she played comedies 
and did what she was told 
with a cheery good-nature 
that made her popular. 

But it is a well-known 
fact that the tragedienne 
yearns for comedy, and 
vice versa. So it's per- 
fectly natural that, in 
time, the desire for dra- 
matic, emotional work 
should come to .Miss 
Dimples. 

So, with much misgiv- 
ing and puzzled head- 
shakes, she was given the 
script for "The Ordeal of 
Elizabeth." Lady Dim- 
ples emerged from the 
emotional scenes with 
colors flying. Since then 
she has played "Hesper of 
the Mountains," "The 
Man at the Curtain," and 
"Indiscretion," in a way 
that does credit to her. 




IIEXRY ALUEUT 1'HILLIl'S 



The Photodrama 

A Department of Expert Advice, Criticism, 

Timely Hints, Plot Construction 

and Market Places 

Conducted by HENRY ALBERT PHILLIPS 



Staff Contributor of the Edison Company, formerly with Pathe 
Freres; Lecturer and Instructor of Prfotoplay Writing in The 
Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences, also in the Y. M. C A. 
nf New York; Author of "The Photodrama" and "The Feature 
Photoplay" and many Current Plays on the Screen, etc. 



Close Views 

and 

Inserts 



Just to say nothing of 
the director who writes 
his own plays. 

But why say noth- 
ing, when there is so 
much to say? For several years now 
the director has been doing all the talk- 
ing, all the everything. The wilting 
author has had to sit back and acknowl- 
edge, "You're right, sir — I'm a dub, sir/' 
The point is that the director used to 
be right in nine cases out of ten. 

The director would be handed a manu- 
script to produce. He would read it and 
try to understand it. An idea might be 
plaving hide-and-seek somewhere be- 
tween the lines ; but the director is a 
busy man and has little time for parlor 
games. Or the author had probably 
written the play according to fiction 
methods, which are as different from 
photoplay development as night is from 
day. Whatever it was — it was not a 
photoplay all ready for putting on. 

It was but natural, logical and just 
for the director to exclaim, "Aw — well, 
I could do better than that myself !" 

And so he could — and probably did: 

And so the director got into that de- 
liciously bad habit of picking up an 
extra hundred or so, every time he put 
on a new play. 

But plays and play technique and good 
photoplays have multiplied since those 
days ; but, alas, the director's habit of 
the itching palm has become worse than 
the hives. He cant see a good play- 
manuscript with a telescope — unless he 
writes it himself. "It cant be done!" is 
his frequent verdict on manuscripts that 



are easy to do and contain dramatic ideas 
far superior to any he might be able to 
conceive. 

Let him devote his energies to direct- 
ing — that art demands concentration, 
study and endless pains. 

A jack-of-all-trades never becomes 
master of one. 

The general manager of one of the 
biggest companies told me that he had 
to forbid the submission of plays by 
directors at all, so pernicious had be- 
come the, habit of straddling their jobs. 

Nevertheless, some research in this 
particular reveals the startling fact that 
more than ten per cent. — at the very 
least- — of the plays screened are "written 
and directed by — Mr. Same Person." 

If the producers honestly-cross-their- 
hearts cant get good plays otherwise, 
tli en I shall immediately proceed to eat 
my words, even if they asphyxiate me ! 

Today I think they can. 

But that does not let the writers out. 
A few writers are doing better stuff : 
but the majority are turning out poorer 
material than ever. It all seems so easy 
and the rewards are so big. Just like 
taking candy from the baby — only the 
baby is beginning to cut his wisdom- 
teeth, as the careless writer learns who 
places his finger in his mouth instead of 
the candy. 

Careless writers are worse than di- 
rectors with the itching palm, for there 
is some excuse for the latter. 

And so we end another chapter on 
Why the Public Is Getting Poor Plays. 
But Mr. and Mrs. Public needn't feel so 



91 



92 



THE PHOTODRAMA 



smug about it! We are going to show- 
why they are as much to blame as the 
Prospering Director, and the Careless 
Author, and the Self-Satisfied Producer. 



Plotting 

the 

Photoplay 



A Photoplay Plot is 
the unpolished ma- 
terial for a complete 
decisive action; it is 
composed of cumula- 
tive and interesting incidents rising to a 
dramatic climax, ^nd terminating in a 
manner calculated to gratify and war- 
rant the interest roused in its beginning. 

To the producer, a Plot is material 
capable of being dramatized thru vis- 
ualized action into a life-story. 

To the playwright, the Plot is sugges- 
tive material capable of being developed 
into the nucleus of a story. 

The average plot-builder makes the 
mistake of looking upon Plot material 
a's so many ready-made plots. He thus 
confuses the Plot Germ (or Material) 
with Complete Plot. 

Plot Germs lie about us by the score ; 
Complete Plots are hidden in the most 
evasive creases of our imaginative 
genius. The Plot Germ is merely an 
item of suggestive plot material, which 
may be lost sight of entirely in the 
search for logical incidents to complete 
the plot that is eventually led up to. 
Plot germs then are ready-made; but 
complete plots are made-to-order. 



Screenings 

from 

Current Plays 



Why inject any "popu- 
lar" serum into a per- 
fectly healthy play and 
make it sick unto 
death ? 
We are asking Metro Pictures Cor- 
poration this with "The Brand of 
Cowardice" as the patient. The real 
victim is the star, Lionel Barrymore. 
We often wonder how an actor of re- 
pute, who would disdain the "ten-twenty- 
thirty mellow-drammer" as a vehicle for 
his highly developed talent, must feel 
when he sees the inanities of a flaring 
movie thru which he has been made to 
cavort. 

The lamented popular serum referred 
to is Mexico. 

Just as we have seen "The Heart of 
Paula" several months ago ruined by 



Mexicanization, so we see "The Brand 
of Cowardice" made a veritable 
"greaser" of plays. 

The point seems to have been that 
topical interest is centered on our boys 
in Mexico, therefore do let's write a play 
that brings in Mexico ! So they proceed 
to take out of the chest of chestnuts that 
worm-eaten plot wherein the hero acts 
the cuvvard in the presence of the 
heroine, whereupon the heroine scorns 
him and hands him back his ring. There 
is but one thing left for him to do — be- 
come the bravest of the brave in spite 
of his native cowardice, and then be 
dubbed the sure-enough hero of the play 
at the end. 

We have no quarrel with the directing 
of "The Brand of Cowardice" — on the 
contrary, it is above the average. But 

the story ! We quite agree with 

Shakespeare, "The Play's the thing." 

In another play we would say there 
was something wrong in putting to- 
gether the film — but nothing seems to 
trouble the makers of this play, so why 
worry ? For here is the heroine lost 
and found by the Mexican villain, who 
is carrying off the machine-gun to his 
hacienda. He takes the heroine with 
him. The hero learns this and follows 
alone, for the poor old Indian is bitten 
by a venomous serpent. Single-handed 
the hero goes to the Mexican village and 
vanquishes the villain. Takes the heroine 
away. Is pursued by a horde of dusky 
Mexicans some time the next day. 
Three rounds of cartridges are left, and 
heroine decides to die by one of them 
rather than fall into the hands of the 
Mexican fiends. Hero is about to fire 
the ball thru her heart, when father and 
troop appear, and before the entire 
army of several hundred soldiers he is 
branded a hero! 

Still they ask, Why aren't the audi- 
ences satisfied? 



Lessonettes 



Most failures are due 

to minor faults, not 

major errors. In his 

feverish scramble to 

hurry his idea to the photoplay editor, 

the inexperienced writer too often 

(Continued on page 160) 



Breaking Into the Movies in California 

A Diary 

By SUZETTE BOOTH 

(This series began in the January number, and this is the third instalment) 

Note: To the many girl readers all over the United States whose one ambition in 
life is California and the movies, I dedicate this diary. It is not the great stars that can 
give advice. When they broke in, it was very easy; but the girl of today, that comes 
here alone and unaided and tries to get in, is the one that can relate the hard, cold facts. 



January 22, 1916 (continued). — 
On the line with us two well-dressed 
women stood near me and amused me 
with their conversation. One, a middle- 
aged lady of fifty, said, "If my hus- 
band or sons knew their mother chased 
the studios, they would never for- 
give me, but I love it ; no more card clubs 
for me." The other said, "My husband 
would divorce me, but I get home be- 
fore he does, and he is none the wiser." 
Have discovered a new disease — "Movie- 
itis" — very contagious to young and old. 
My turn came, and I told Captain Ford 
Mr. DeMille sent me. I was willing to 
work "extra" for a while, but he would 
not listen to it. "You are too beautiful for 
that. Will place your name, et cetera, in 
my book and give you the first chance, 
but cant promise anything immediate," he 
said. The book was filled with the names 
and addresses of some of the best-known 
people in the business; he read some of 
them to me. I decided my chances would 
be slim, and said I would rather work 
"extra" at three dollars a day than not 
at all. He replied, "Very well- 1 — seven 
a. m. at the studio Monday." 

January 24, 1916.— Monday. Left 
call at hotel to ring me at five-thirty. 
Telephone is ringing. I am so sleepy ; 
so dark outside ; dress wearily. Around 
the hotel all is still ; out on the street it 
is cold and pitch dark. Must have some 
coffee ; none of the restaurants are open. 
Finally find one just opening, so I have 
some breakfast and start for Hollywood. 
The car is filled with Mexican laborers. 
At the studio a great crowd is gathered 
around the office ; all are sleepy-eyed — 
cold. Captain Ford arrives, and says, 
"Ladies first. Go to window and receive 
yellow slip," which says, "Miss Booth 
employed January 21st— $3.00." A tall 
girl, seeing I am a stranger, shows me 



93 



where to go for my costume. A shrill- 
voiced woman in charge screams, "Girls, 
hurry up ; if you dont I will take them 
away from you." I tell one of the as- 
sistants my size, and she hands me a big 
bundle. Then I and my new friend hunt 
a dressing-room. A narrow walk, sur- 
rounded by frame sheds on -either side, 
were the dressing-rooms. Opening 'one, 
it was so packed with girls that they 
screamed, "Dont any more come in here : 
we are suffocating!" Opening another, it 
was just as crowded, but we had to get 
in, so we dressed on a postage stamp. 
Before we could get into our costumes, 
came the command, "Everybody en the 
lot at once." On the lot we were a queer- 
looking sight — the men in short trcusers 
and yellow curls, and the girls in their 
demure, Quaker-gray dresses. The play, 
"To Have and to Hold," featuring Mae 
Murray and Wallace Reid, had hardly 
been working an hour, when Captain 
Ford called, thru a megaphone, "Miss 
Booth !" "Well, here is your chance," 
every one said. The director looked me 
over. Well, I was too young ; he wanted 
an older woman. We worked until three, 
without stopping, in the broiling sun, and 
were told we- were thru for the day. 
Cashing our checks at the office, we went 
to a little tea-room for lunch, and came 
back to Los Angeles. Am completely 
worn out, and have resolved this is my 
first and last experience as an extra. If 
I cannot land a good position in some 
studio, I will give up my ambition to be 
a. movie star. 

February 25, 1916. — Friday, the rainy 
season is on ; it has rained incessantly the 
last month. Studios are flooded (the 
papers state). The sun is shining today : 
guess I'll visit some studios. Fox 
promised me a position a few weeks 
ago ; will go there first. Board car for 



94 



BREAKING INTO THE MOVIES IN CALIFORNIA 



Edendale. At the studio Mr. Rodgers 
greeted me cordially: "So glad you 
came, Miss Booth — have been waiting the 
last two weeks for one of our stars to 
come from the East. If she isn't here 
by Monday could you take her place? 
You are a dandy size for Win. Far- 
num ; he is such a large man he prefers 
a tall girl." Mr. Farnum came in and 
Mr. Rodgers introduced me, saying: 
"What do you think of this girl for 
your leading lady?" Mr. Farnum, who 
is noted for his affable disposition, 
smiling, said: "She suits me." Mr. 
Rodgers said I should phone him at 
ten in the morning. I leave studio 
trembling like I had a chill, my heart 
fluttering. At last the fatal moment 
had arrived ! My first position— "lead- 
ing lady." Ate my dinner so fast I 
nearly choked to death ; phoned all my 
friends and told them I was engaged 
as leading woman for William Farnum. 

February 26, 1916. — Certainly slept 
very little last night ; when I did, 
dreamt I was living in that little rose- 
bedecked bungalow in St. James Court, 
riding around in a Mercer roadster, 
reading Suzette Booth and Wm. Far- 
num on all the sign-boards. Phoned 
Mr. Rodgers at ten, but he wasn't in; 
phoned at one- he answered (not 
very cordial). Said: "Come out to the 
studio at five." It was dusk when I 
started for Edendale and bitterly cold. 
At the studio office a log fire burnt 
brightly in a huge fireplace (being 
Saturday the office was crowded with 
extra people). Mr. Rodger's tone was 
as cold as the fire was warm. He said : 
"I dont know anything about it, Miss 
Booth; come out some other time." 
"Oh!" was all I could say, as I 
grasped the counter for support. I 
was limp as a rag, but my temper was 
aroused so I blurted out : "Hope you 
have enjoyed yourself, Mr. Rodgers," 
and hastily left the Fox studio. Ate no 
dinner tonight, threw myself across my 
bed and sobbed and sobbed all that 
"leading lady for William Farnum" stuff 
out of my system. 

February 27, 1916. — I feel like a bal- 
loon with the gas all out of it. Phone 
rang several times, cant answer it — so 
afraid some one might congratulate me. 



February 28, 1916. — Editorial in 
morning's paper said George Washing- 
ton was knocked down many times, 
but always got up again. Guess I'll do 
likewise. Have decided to try Hors- 
ley's Studio (Mutual), so I start out to 
find the studio at Main and Washing- 
ton. At the office the girl in charge 
says I must see Mr. Bishop any even- 
ing at six. It is now three. I'll go 
back to town and try tomorrow. 

February 29, 1916. — Again start for 
Horsley's. At the studio wait in a lit- 
tle summer pagoda in the yard. It is 
cold and dark. Bostock's animal 
jungle occupies half the studio lot, and 
lions roar and roar, adding a dismal 
touch to the scene. Two poorly 
dressed girls come in, also an old 
couple. Mr. Bishop finally arrived. 
He talked quite a while with me, said 
they could use me some future time, 
but had nothing for me at present. As 
I passed the office an employee (a Jew- 
ish girl) called after me: "Have you an 
evening gown?" I said: "Yes." "Well 
come out tomorrow and 'atmosphere.' ' : 
"I am leading lady, not 'atmosphere/ ,: 
I retorted disdainfully. When extra 
people work it is called atmosphering. 
Dined at "Levy's" this evening, Los 
Angeles' swellest cafe — wine, women 
and song were very much in evidence. 
Next table to me sat Charlie Chaplin 
and Edna Purviance. Charlie, who 
earns $600,000 a year and spends $10.00 
a week, was drinking ginger ale. Mae 
Marsh sat at another table, looking 
very bored. Robert Harron, her fiance, 
was with her. Cecil DeMille, of 
Lasky's, was using a chafing-dish. All 
looked so prosperous. Well, I hope I 
shall be one of them before long. 

March 1, 1916. — Met a well-known 
movie actor today. He said I should 
try Kalem, the studio that made Alice 
Joyce famous. Dressed in my best, I 
start out to the studio at Flemming 
and Sunset Boulevard. The Kalem 
Company is directly back of Griffith's 
Reliance. At the office three little 
white puppies played around the floor. 
One of the 57 varieties of old maids 
was busy pounding a typewriter. Said 
I wished to see the manager. 

(Continued on page 158) 



A Child of Fortune 



By JOHNSON BRISCOE 



That was the very title she applied to 
herself, and, surely, if any one 
should believe it, it should be Mae 
Murray — yes, the 
same Mae Murray 
who a short while 
ago was a glitter- 
ing, dazzling figure 
in Broadway's 
night-life and who 
more recently has 
been so successful 
upon the screen. 

"How could you 
bring yourself to do 
it — abandon Bo- 
hemia for filmdom?" 
was my first ques- 
tion, as we settled 
ourselves for a chat 
in her dressing- 
room at the Famous 
Players studio. 

Miss* Murray 
looked at me in 
genuine, wide-eyed 
amazement. "W h y 
do you and so many 
other people ask me 
that same question? 
Is it so very hard to 
understand ? I be- 
lieve, just now at 
any rate, that pic- 
tures are the bigger, 
more important me- 
dium. My oppor- 
tunities on the stage 
were always rather 
limited, for I* was 
never permitted to 
do much but sing 
and dance. And I 
want to act!" she 
finished off, quite 
dramatically. 

"Oh, yes, indeed, I do. I'm quite 
serious in my determination some day 
to be a dramatic actress, and, meanwhile, 
pictures are a happy field in which to 
grow and develop. Then, there is the 
opportunity of getting established more 




MAE MURRAY IN THE BIG SISTER 



95 



quickly, of being better, more generally 
known. On the stage you simply appear 
before a theater ful of people, while 
on the screen tens of 
thousands may see 
you every night. 
My name is better 
known today, after a 
season in pictures, 
than in all the years 
I was on the stage. 
When the day comes 
that I shall return to 
the spoken drama, 
cant you see what a 
valuable asset all 
this will be to me? 
People will be more 
curious than ever to 
see me in the flesh. 
And think of the 
change and variety 
in a single day's 
work ; you come in 
touch with so many 
phases of humanity, 
from smart society 
to the poorest slums. 
Why, would you be- 
lieve it," she con- 
tinued, very serious- 
ly, "until I went into 
pictures I had never 
even visited the 
slum's of a city ! In 
a single year in pic- 
tures I've gained 
more knowledge of 
life than all the rest 
of my days put 
together. 

"How did it all 
come about that I 
was able to begin at 
the very top in pic- 
tures Well, firmly 
believing that I am a child of fortune, 
yon may remember the little, comedy 
screen appearance I made in 'The Fol- 
lies of 1915.' Apparently I was more 
successful at that than I knew, for 
immediatelv I received dozens of offers 




Mae Murray, the girl who tired of dancing and singing on the stage, and who craved an opportunity to act 



A CHILD OF FORTCXE 



97 



from the various manufacturers. And 
I accepted Mr. Lasky's. Nervous at 
first ? Well, I should say I was ! In my 
initial picture, 'To Have and to Hold,' 
I scarcely knew what I was doing at all, 
I felt so strange and frightened and self- 
conscious — the people around the studio ; 
the noise, bustle and confusion, and the 
absence of an audience and footlights. I 
sort of gripped myself tensely, humped 
up my shoulders, so to speak, and 
plunged ahead. But all this wore off 
with my second picture — thanks largely 
to the tact, consideration and helpful 
suggestions of my director, James 
Young." 

Somehow or other, I had a set, firm 
belief in my mind that Miss Murray was 
missing the glitter, gayety and excite- 
ment of her recent stage career, a life 
as diametrically opposed to filmdom as 
one could possibly imagine. But she 
would not yield to my contention. 

"No, I never really liked Broadway 
night-life, for my dreams and ambitions 
were centered upon something above 
that. The greatest difficulty I had was 
to readjust myself to the working hours; 
you see, now I arise at about the same 
hour at which I formerly went to bed! 
We have to be in the studio, ready and 
made up, at nine o'clock. But I dont 
mind that, either, because I got used to 
the new order of things in the wonderful 
California air. Oh, California, how I 
love it, and how glad I shall be to 
return there again ! You see, the picture- 
players' colony at Los Angeles is really 
much like a touch of Paris in its freedom 
and gayety and good fellowship. Oh, 
and the parties they give there!" Here 
she gave an eloquent, expressive gesture, 
breathing of a spirit of freedom, which 
showed plainly that the screen-players' 
life in California is all that it is cracked 
up to be — and even more than that! "I 
had such an attractive bungalow out 
there that I hated to give it up," and her 
face wore a fleeting, wistful sort of smile. 

Either by accident or design, or, more 
likely still, the call of the day's work, 
Miss Murray was a most attractive- 
looking little figure of ingenuous girl- 
hood. Plainly dressed in a little, black 
silk frock, with collar and cuffs of simple, 
sheer lace attached, she looked more like 



a school-girl than a rapidly growing, in- 
ternational film favorite. A mass of 
golden-brown curls topped her head, sur- 
mounting a pair of most expressive blue 
eyes. And here I would set it down, she 
hasn't a frill or an affectation in her 
whole make-up. Indeed, her genuine 
simplicity of manner, her unstudied, 
wholesome enthusiasm for her work were 
almost disconcerting to one who had a 
preconceived idea (always an absurd 
thing to possess) that she would probably 
prove to be a haughty, proud, somewhat 
aloof creature, full of airs and graces. 
Not a bit like it. She admitted her age 
to me, but details like that seem super- 
fluous when one doesn't look it by a good 
half-dozen years and more. ''What? 
Oh, yes; I'm sure I look as old as I am, 
and I wish I didn't." In the vulgar ver- 
nacular — she should worry! With Mary 
Pickford, Marguerite Clark, Marie Doro, 
Marguerite Courtot and Mae Murray all 
flying the Famous Players-Lasky colors, 
that firm would appear to have gathered 
in most of the delicate, feminine bric-a- 
brac of the studios. They are each such 
charmingly dainty, piquant bits of femi- 
ninity that the wonder of it is how they 
are all provided with suitable material*. 
Naturally, we talked of many thing's — 
from the French salons to Flo Ziegfeld, 
and from slum experiences to Marguerite 
Clark, whom she happily and aptly de- 
scribed as ''The Dream of the Screen." 
And also, ''Wallie Reid, dear boy, is 
just as good-looking off the screen as on, 
with the most wonderful profile, and he's 
so devoted to his wife ! . . . My Lasky 
contract is for three years, thank good- 
ness ! . . . Owing to the great success 
of 'The Dream Girl,' I sometimes won- 
der if I am to specialize in slum pictures 
. . . John O'Brien, my present director 
in 'The Big Sister,' is really a wonder — so 
big and fine and understanding ... I owe 
a lot to Julian Mitchell, who gave me my 
very first chance behind the footlights 
. . . You would be astonished at the let- 
ters one receives from every quarter of 
the globe ... It is certainly mighty nice 
of you to want to interview me (art- 
ful little flatterer) . . . Did you ever 
see anything as foolish as the photo- 
graphs of screen stars in bathing-suits? 
(Continued on page 156) 



MAY ALLISON AND HAROLD LOCKWOOD HOLDING THEIR OWN DOG-SHOW 




98 



On Location with Harold Lockwood and 

May Allison 



By BENNIE ZEIDMAN 



My assignment from the editor read : 
"Trail Harold Lockwood and May 
Allison on their location tour to 
Monterey, California," and I herewith 
report the results. 

We arrived in Monterey on a bleak 
Monday morning, and continued in our 
automobile to the fashionable Del Monte 
Hotel, where opulent Californians spend 
their winters. By the time we had 
finished breakfast, the sun was out, and 
we started on a tour of the seventeen-mile 
ocean drive, which encircles the entire 
Monterey peninsula. We speeded thru 
old Monterey, with its historic memories 
and romantic associations of the padre 
days and early life of the State. We con- 
tinued motoring thru Pacific Grove, then 
into the beautiful pine forests along 
sandy beaches and surf-beaten rocky 
shores. This is considered one of the 
most picturesque drives in the country. 
The Lockwood automobile made this 
trip in exactly an hour. Chauffeur 
Harold averaged about twenty miles an 
hour on the seacoast driveway. 

Harold Lockwood suggested that we 
carry some luncheon, change our attire 
to climbing suits, and spend the after- 
noon tramping along the rocky coast. 
We acquiesced to this brilliant sugges- 
tion, and promptly at two o'clock, with 
a loaded Graflex, we motored in the 
direction of Monterey Bay, where we 
stopped to change a tire. Poor Harold 
was compelled to "get out and get un- 
der." While the screen hero was chang- 
ing the tire, we wandered over to the 
bay, and one of the fishermen, a kindly- 
old soul, volunteered to assist Miss Alli- 
son into a rowboat and provided her 
with a fishing outfit. Beginners are al- 
ways fortunate in their initial endeavor, 
for charming May soon caught a fairly 
large fish. 

"Gee! what a lucky catch!" spoke up 
Harold Lockwood, as May Allison, clad 
in a becoming sporting suit, called her 
co-star's attention to the captured fish. 
Harold presented the kind fisherman 
with a cigar: "A two-bit cigar for you — 



99 



bit off at each end," he concluded, smil- 
ingly, leaving the Coast resident to won- 
der if it were Mark Twain who had 
presented him with the cigar. 

We later learnt that no less an authority 
than David Starr Jordan, president of 
Leland Stanford University, recently said 
that more forms of marine animal life are 
to be found in Monterey Bay than in any 
similar body of water in the world. 

Once again started on our journey, we 
passed the Pebble Beach Lodge, a very 
unique club-house built of large pine- 
logs. . The road then led thru the pretty 
villa town of Carmel-by-the-Sea, the 
home of a large colony of recognized 
artists, past the old Carmel Mission, 
along the valley, and over the placid Rio 
Carmelo to Point Lobos. Handsome 
Harold stopped his motor, and we pre- 
pared for our climb. For almost an hour 
we traveled over large, pointed rocks of a 
very freakish formation and at last 
reached our destination. We had been 
fooled by distance, and climbing over 
these rocks was not so pleasant as Harold 
MacGrath so vividly describes in his sea- 
coast story, "Pidgin Island." It was 
this book that the Yorke-Metro Company 
were picturizing along the seventeen- 
mile drive, which accounts for Harold 
and May's trip to Monterey. Lockwood 
donned his sou'wester and waterproof 
hat, and then suggested that we rest for 
a while. He quoted : "With long travel 
I am stiff and weary," from Shakespeare, 
and Miss May Allison chirped, "My 
kingdom for a cherry sundae." Ten 
minutes had passed ;the waves were dash- 
ing madly against the rocks, and we, fresh 
with ambition, continued our expedition 
and walked out to the extreme point, and 
here I snapped some photographs of 
the two screen stars. One high wave 
completely covered Lockwood a second 
after I had snapped my lens. May Alli- 
son, in climbing from a large rock to a 
small one covered with seaweed, almost 
slipped, but Harold proved himself a 
hero in real life, in addition to his screen 
record. May Allison made us happy with 



100 



ON LOCATION WITH LOCKWOOD AND ALLISON 



the announcement that the boxed lunches 
were in the automobile. We started back 
to where the car was parked, and oh, how 
we enjoyed the turkey sandwiches and 
hard-boiled eggs ! We arrived at the 
hotel just at sundown and planned to 
spend the next morning visiting historic 
Monterey. Here, in 1602, eighteen years 
before the Pilgrim Fathers landed at 
Plymouth Rock, came Vizcaino, a bold 
adventurer who took possession of Cali- 
fornia in the name of the King of Spain. 
One hundred and sixty-seven years later 
came good Father Juniper o Serra to raise 
the cross and found missions which to- 
day delight students of history with their 
collections of quaint books, records and 
relics. ' 

True to our arrangements of the pre- 
vious day, we started early, under the 
supervision of a guide, to visit Monterey. 
Our first point of interest was the old 
customs house, where the American flag 
was first raised by Commodore Sloat in 
1846. On the hill we found Colton Hall, 
the first capitol of California, where the 
State constitution was drafted and first 
legislative , session was held. Almost 
every turn we made we saw sites of 
historic interest : Robert Louis Steven- 
son's house, in which the famous author 
wrote many of his beloved books ; the 
first theater in California, where Jenny 
Lind sang in the early days ; Washington 
Hotel, once a Spanish barrack, later the 
most fashionable hotel of the town, and 
now in complete ruins ; the first sawed 
lumber-house in California, made of lum- 
ber brought by a sailing ship around the 
Horn; the first' brick-house built in the 
State, and the old whaling station, of 
which Dana wrote in his early book, 
'Two Years Before the Mast." Scat- 
tered thru back streets and about the 
town we saw quaint abodes that housed 
proud Spanish families. 

It was then almost noon, and the call, 
issued by Producer Fred J. Balshofer, 
was to be made up and ready to leave the 
hotel for location at one o'clock. We 
hurried back to the hotel, ate a quick 
lunch, and Lockwood and Allison went 
to their respective rooms to make up for 
their characters. They were both cast 
to play Secret Service agents — one to 
gain luxuries, and the other, the girl, to 



shield her criminal father and brother 
from the law. 

I journeyed with them to location, took 
a few more snaps of the two pleasant 




HAROLD LOCKWOOD AND "SNOOKY 

stars, had a most harmless chat with 
Lester Cuneo, the bloodthirsty screen 
villain, and boarded the afternoon train 
for Los Angeles. 




WALTER LAW AND VIRGINIA PEARSON IN "THE WAR BRIDE'S SECRET" (FOX) 



How Helen Holmes Became 



By PEARL 




Five years ago J. P. MacGowan was 
peacefully directing two-reel pic- 
tures in Jacksonville, Florida, hav- 
ing for his leading players Alice Hollister 
and James Vincent, under the Kalem 
brand. Five years ago Helen Holmes 
was peacefully working out in California, 
with no thought in her pretty head of a 
tall, lanky individual who was destined 
soon to cross her path for life. 



102 



Kalem wired Mr. MacGowan to leave 
immediately for California, where George 
Melford was directing the destinies of 
Alice Joyce, and to form another Kalem 
company. Mr. MacGowan was, appar- 
ently, the unofficial organizer for Kalem, 
since this was the sixth time he had re- 
ceived similar instructions. So he set out. 
He arrived in Los* Angeles, and, since it 
was Sunday and he had little chance of 






Mrs. Mack and a Picture Star 



CADDIS 




engaging actors on that day, he hired an 
automobile and set out in search of loca- 
tions, having worked out the plot for his 
first picture on his way West. Alone in 
the car, twenty miles from a habitation, 
the car broke down. It was up to him 
to fix it, since everything had gone wrong 
at once. He did it, eventually, but it was 
pitch dark when he was ready to go on. 
Of course, in his twisting and turning 



103 



about, trying out promising-looking roads 
and trails in search of locations, he had 
gotten hopelessly lost. 

Now, when one is hopelessly lost, espe- 
cially on a mountain road in California, 
there are two things one may do. The 
old trails of the Spaniards are still in 
existence, slightly broadened to permit 
the passage of wagons. Some of them 
lead you somewhere, some of them lead 



104 



HOW HELEN HOLMES BECAME MRS. MACK 



you somewhere else, or nowhere in par- 
ticular. So the two things you may do — 
you may keep going, hoping that there 
was some truth in the old gag about all 
roads leading to Rome, or you may sit 
down and wait for some one to come 
along, who speaks your brand of English, 
and to direct you on your way. If you 




PERHAPS THIS IS HOW SHE LOOKED 
WHEN HE SAID IT, AND 

choose the latter course, and do not die 
of starvation before some one comes 
along, you will probably emerge from the 
canyon next Thursday, or thereabouts. 
As Mr. MacGowan happened there on 
Sunday, one may see that the second 
alternative lacks many fine points. So he 
chose the former. 



I shant attempt to describe that night. 
In the first place, it beggars my poor 
powers of description, and in the second 
place, Mr. MacGowan — or "Mack," as he 
is known at the studio — the only living 
witness of the occasion, does not remem- 
ber all that passed, or that he passed, him- 
self. Suffice it to say that, as the church 
clocks struck six-thirty Monday morning, 
he rolled up to the hotel, from which he 
had departed with such joyous lack of 
knowledge of the consequences the after- 
noon before. 

He had no time for breakfast, but, 
leaving a call for two hours later, he 
slid upstairs, fell into bed, and slept. 
The call was never given, but when he 
awoke, several hours later, he discovered 
that he should have been at the studio an 
hour or more ago. He had telephoned 
Mabel Normand — an old friend from the 
East — the day before, to send him some 
players, and she had promised to send 
several. So he knew they were waiting 
patiently, and it was no easy matter, five 
years ago, to get players. Therefore, 
still in the khaki of his ill-fated auto-trip, 
unshaven and unshorn, wearing his bed- 
room slippers, and red-eyed for,; sleep, he 
looked for his hat, and, failing to find it, 
set out without it, about half-awake. 

The girls were waiting patiently at the 
studio, and, after some talk, he engaged 
one of them, and invited the whole bunch 
to lunch. During the midst of the prep- 
arations for lunch, another girl entered 
and asked for him. She was invited to 
lunch, also, as Mr. Mack hated to refuse 
her work and luncheon at the same time. 
He became interested in this late-comer — 
yes, it was Helen Holmes — and the more 
he talked to her the more interested he 
became, and the more certain that in en- 
gaging the other girl he had made a 
miscalculation. During the meal he in- 
vited the other girl — the engaged one — to 
a private consultation. 

"In lieu of the position I offered you," 
he said succinctly, "I am going to give 
you these two weeks' salary out of my 
own little pocket. Now dont ask me any 
questions. Just take it for granted and 
come back and let's finish eating." 

Short and to the point, you see, just as 
all his statements and decisions are. 

The first picture produced by Mr. Mack 



HOW HELEN HOLMES BECAME MRS. MACK 



105 



carried Helen Holmes in the second lead, 
the first lead being played by May Harti- 
gan, with Paul C. Hurst and William 
Brunton, both of whom are still with Mr. 
Mack after five years. 

At the time all this happened, Helen 
Holmes was visiting Mabel Normand, 
and when the call came for players for 
Mr. Mack, Mabel dispatched Helen, with 
this admonition : 

"Now, Helen, whatever you do, dont 
you dare fall in love with this big Aus- 
tralian. I'd always feel guilty, for I 
know him, and he's not meant for a 
benedict. He's been a globe-trotter too 
long. Remember that now !" 

Helen promised Mabel that she would, 
and, with high hopes of a splendid posi- 
tion, set out for the studio. What hap- 
pened there has already been told. It is 
generally understood by cynics, wise- 
acres, and misogynists, that the surest 
way to make a girl fall in love with a 
man is to warn her not to do that very 
little thing. At any rate, that is what 
happened to Helen Holmes. 

They met on April fourth, and on July 
fourth, five years ago, they slipped away 
to the minister's, and when they returned, 
both were wearing plain, gold bands on 
the third finger of the left hand. And 
those same plain, gold bands are still 
reposing peacefully on the same fingers. 

Being an intrepid sort of person, and 
having grown impervious to outraged 
glares when I trespass on ground that 
would never know the light footfall of 
angels, I asked Mr. Mack how it hap- 
pened. No, he didn't glare at me and 
call a studio worker to have me thrown 
into the rain-water barrel or off the 
premises. He just grinned, shifted his 
cigar, took another look at his scenario, 
and said, with likable boyishness, despite 
his six-foot-two of brain and brawn : 

"I'll be dog-goned if I know how it 
did happen, now that you come to ask 
me. We just drifted along, enjoying 
each other's society ; never grew senti- 
mental ; were always pals, comrades 
rather than sweethearts. Still, we just 
sort of took it for granted that it was 
bound to happen sooner or later. So we 
were, in a measure, prepared for the blow 
when it fell. I'm not a demonstrative 
sort of individual, and I dont even re- 



member what I said when I said it. I 
do remember that Miss Holmes had the 
good taste not to say that it was 'so 
sudden' or anything like that. Nor did 
she fall on my neck and burst into tears 
of joy — I'm afraid my nerves wouldn't 
have been equal to the shock if she had. 
Instead, she took it very much as I did — 







THIS IS HOW SHE LOOKED AFTER IT 
WAS ALL OVER 

for granted. I presume that she said 
'Yes' — she must have, in the light of 
after events, and from the evidence of 
the ring on my hand the next time I 
chanced to look at it. But, so far as I 
know, no record remains of any of that." 
And Helen Holmes-MacGowan merely 



106 



HOW HELEN HOLMES BECAME MRS. MACK 






grinned a little boyishly, and said she 
didn't know of any, either. 

Now for some side-lights on the home- 
life of these two undemonstrative peo- 
ple. They live very simply in a pretty 
little bungalow (dark red with white 
trimmings), overgrown with vines and 
flowers. This sits just back from Pasa- 
dena Avenue, in the center of a mass of 
California foliage. The back yard is 
hedged in on all sides by a wall 
which is overgrown with great masses of 
honeysuckle and smilax. Now for the 
most interesting part. This back fence 
forms, on one side, the boundary of the 
MacGowan home ; on the other side, the 
boundary of the Signal studio. So Miss 
Holmes is separated from her home, 
when at work, by a garden gate and a 
flower-bordered path. It is almost like 
working at home, and, to the best of my 
knowledge, is the only studio bungalow 
in the world like this. 

Helen drives her own car: — or cars, for 
she has three — but the pet of them all is 
a white racer, upholstered in dark red. 
When she is driving in civilization, she is 
a model of propriety and careful driving. 
She breaks no traffic laws, and children 
and pedestrians need have no fear of be- 
ing run down and crippled by her car. 



In the outskirts of Los Angeles, on the 
San Fernando boulevard, there is a 
stretch of road with a notice that informs 
the gentle speeder, "Speed. Limit, One 
Hundred Miles Per Hour." Miss Holmes 
pays visits to this portion of the road 
when things have been too quiet and 
peaceful at the studio ; then let all comers 
watch their step ! Thus far she has never 
met Barney Oldfield or Teddy Tetzlaff 
on this course; some day she will, and 
the result will go down into the annals 
of speed history. 

But her love for motoring doesn't inter- 
fere with her love for horses. In the 
stables at the studio, Mr. Mack's power- 
ful mare and Miss Holmes' Dicksie 
(given her by Mr. -Spearman, just before 
beginning "Whispering Smith,'' and 
which was named for the character, Dick- 
sie Dunning, in the story) are treated 
with the respect due such aristocracy. 
And the two do a great deal of riding in 
the hills around Los Angeles. She is also 
very fond of dogs. She has a brindle. 
bull, a big, white, bow-legged bull, one 
collie, a Spitz, and five coyote pups ! 

Personally, Miss Holmes is charming, 
and Mr. Mack is the sort of man that 
makes you sorry the other girl saw him 
first. 



T 



Maxims of Methuselah 

(Interpreted by HARVEY PEAKE) 

rain up a child in the way it should go to the Motion Playhouse, and it will 
not depart from this track into the saloon or gambling-house. 

And I say unto thee that all the blood of bulls and goats will not wash 
white the tongue of that female who goeth into the public picture theater to 
gossip out aloud of her neighbors and her friends. 

Bend thine ears to the ground and hearken unto the voice of the people, 
and thou wilt hear only increasing praise of the wonder-working films, film 
players and film producers. 

And do not fail at divers times to lift up thy hand and give thanks to 
the powers that 'be that thou mayest see a film whose cost was fifty thousand 
shekels of silver for only ten pieces of copper. 

O daughter of mine old age, allow not thy heart to go pitapat at the 
advent upon the screen of the handsome actor, for in nine cases out of ten he 
is not only muchly married, but muchly bored with love. 

And lastly, my son, look not upon the exit lamp when it is reel, for no 
sooner wilt thou get out of the picture theater than thou wilt wish thyself 
back, and in order to accomplish this it will cost thee another admission fee t 




Mte Jsevi/y Jay JLdrgr 








There are times when, wearied of 
tending" the subterranean fires, Satan 
turns his undivided attention to the 
earth. He makes of it a vast bowl, and 
for ingredients he takes men and women, 
love and passion, hatred and fanged jeal- 
ousy, open fields and city paves, May 
dawns and fevered lights. From the con- 
glomerate mixture he evolves — etched in 
living flame, blurred by tears — a tragedy. 
From the wrecked lives and crushed 
hearts, the still-born hopes and ashes of 



107 



desires, the futile prayers and faiths gone 
bad, he takes his horrid pay. 

Jean Haskins was of the May-dawn 
variety. Her soul and her body were as 
fresh as its first flushing, and her heart 
was as eager. She was quivering, raw 
material for the Satanic heart : a tender, 
malleable thing, exquisitely ready for 
laughter and joy. poignantly ready for 
suffering, for pain. She held within her 
lovely self the fine potentials of many 



108 



THE DEVIL'S PAY DAY 



things — for those things which are high 
and good and those things which are evil. 
Out of her very tenderness — out of the 
innocence which was ignorant even of it- 
self — the woman would be born. 

Gregory Van Houten was of the 
fevered lights — their veritable son. Be- 
hind him there lay a record unsavory to 
relate — a record all sodden with staled 
wines, and wearied with girls' smiles gone 
cynical, and tragic with the light he had 
quenched in his parents' eyes. A typical 
record — such a record as may be re- 
peated times without end on Broadway; 
an old one and a sad one. 

When he met Jean Haskins he met a 
''something new"— something to quicken 
the sated palate of his emotions; some- 
thing fresher and fairer and sweeter 
than those night-blooming flowers, whose 
bright eyes dulled with the dawning, 
whose scarlet lips showed garish and 
carmined when the night lights were 
turned down ; something that, when bit- 
ten into, did not turn bitter and rotten 
at the core. 

When Jean Haskins met Gregory she 
met the consummation of all her inno- 
cent, fervent dreams — that mythical, mys- 
tical, passionate "some one" of whom she 
had dreamed, for whom she had yearned. 
With the fine ardor of simplicity, than 
which none is keener, none stronger, she 
loved him. The eyes of faith are blind, 
blind eyes — the scales over them heavy 
and opaque. 

There lived for them a month that, 
in the years that followed, neither of 
them ever forgot. It was an interlude — 
or perhaps a prelude — throbbing, fiercely 
tender, breathless. There were trysts in 
the fields when May threw her morning 
banner, pinkly, widely across the sky ; 
when the birds choired, reckless of mel- 
ody ; when the strong odors from bruised 
meadows rose up and dizzied the senses. 
There were trysts in the woods when 
the slim, May moon rose, silver-sweet, 
above the tree-tops, and all the world was 
stilled and only love was good. And, at 
the last, there was the late afternoon 
wedding in the flower-filled parlor of 
Jean's home — the wedding, simply spoken 
by the simple man, who tended souls in 
that -countryside, and sanctified by the 
mother, who smiled thru her tears, and 



the father, who doubted while he smiled. 
Then there were weeks in the tiny cot- 
tage, at the end of a wonderful hawthorn 
lane, and at length Gregory, listless, en- 
nuied, wearied of milk and of honey. 

"We cant ahvays live here, you know," 
he said to Jean, one evening, as they sat 
on the tiny porch, wrapt about in the 
rising scents of wild, rose and honey- 
suckle as in a mantle; "it would be 
deadly." 

Perhaps a woman never forgets the 
instant when the Great Lover becomes no 
longer the lover but the husband, or, even 
worse, an inimical being, with wishes and 
plans and dreams vastly at odds with 
hers. To Jean life had been nothing else 
but the countryside — the rose-embowered 
cottage and Gregory at her side all their 
lives thru. She had desired nothing else ; 
to her there was nothing left to be desired. 
She had thought that Gregory felt the 
same. 

"Where— where shall we live?" she 
faltered, her heart throbbing in instinctive 
fear of some great change that was to 
drive them, stripped of dreaming, out of 
Eden. 

"In town, of course, my dear," Gregory 
laughed, not pleasantly. Simplicity had 
begun to pall. "I could no more stand 
this pastoral we are living in than you 
could stand — well — other things. Butter- 
cups and daisies are all very well for 
a health cure or a midsummer-night's 
dream, but for the life of every day — 
enough, my dear!" 

The following week the Gregory Van 
Houtens returned to the Van Houten 
home near Fifth Avenue. It seemed to 
Jean anything but a home — a great, gor- 
geous, luxurious place ; but the soul of it 
was not there — nor the warm heart that 
keeps heart-fires bright. 

Gregory took to the old ways. At first 
he took Jean with him, but her ways were 
not his ways nor the ways of the crowd 
he traveled with. He came to fear and 
to dislike the wonderment in her great 
eyes — those eyes he had told her were like 
violets seen by moonlight. He grew to 
shrink from the reproaches never spoken, 
save by the pitifully drooping lips or the 
wistful smile she greeted him with. Si- 
lent things, they rose up and clamored 
to him with a million tongues. He won- 



THE DEVIL'S PAY DAY 



109 



dered why he had ever been so infernal 
a fool as to tie himself to what he con- 
temptuously styled a "dairymaid.'' He 
cursed the doctor who had sent him 
to the country for his health. He cursed 
Jean for the softness and sweetness that 
had so befuddled him. He, who had 
known the greatest sirens on Broadway, 
who had toyed with women the world 
around and escaped scot free ; he, Greg- 
ory Van Houten, to be snared, at last, 




Gad ! it 



was a jest! 



a faint amazement, tinged with a faint 
pity for the unfortunate mate of so much 
gaucherie. All this was subtly implied. 
She looked upon the unfortunate mate 
with all the lure of which she was past 
mistress. She won. 

Jean was left alone — to spend money ; 
to entertain, coldly and timidly, the few 
acquaintances she had made ; to wander 
about the shops, and to sob her heart out 
at night on her high and stately bed. 
For there was one thing Jean had learnt 



wm 




IIAXLEY BECAME HER CLOSE CONFIDANT 



Well, matrimony did not mean monog- 
amy "nor imprisonment for life. He had 
served a pretty good sentence down there 
in that rosy villa, and served it — by Jove ! 
— with a d — n good grace. He had 
quaffed buttermilk and sipped the nectar 
from unsullied lips like any adolescent ; 
now he was wearied. The very best an- 
tithesis he could find was Hazel David- 
son. She had to offer all that Jean had 
not — and considerably more. She had 
played the game till her finesse was ex- 
quisite. She wore super-daring gowns 
with a super-daring grace. She looked 
upon the most brutally murdered conven- 
tion with the uttermost nonchalance. 
She looked upon Jean Van Houten with 




— one lesson she 

letter perfect ; one 

Van Houten had in 

into the deeps of her 

— the need of love. His she wanted more 

than anything — more than any one's on 

earth. If she could not have his. then 

the great ache at her heart must be 

otherwise stilled. 

Xo woman with eyes like great violets, 
a mouth like a rose, and hair like living 
sun, need be desolate in Xew York. 
James Hanley saw to it that Jean Van 
Houten was not. Her simplicity won him 
even as it had won Gregory Van Houten 
— only he was older ; he knew more 
thoroly the difference between the glitter 



110 



THE DEVIL'S PAY DAY 



of brass and the clean sun of gold. He 
could put Hazsl Davidson and Jean to- 
gether on a scale and laugh at the scale's 
balance. 

Jean was not skilled in the ways of in- 
trig-ue. She allowed Han- 
ley to come to see her ; she she raised 
wore his flowers and mo- and clu 

tored to luncheon and tea 
with him, merely because 
she was very lonely — 
very heart-hungry — 
and more grateful 
than amorous. He 
stilled a little bit 
the unceasing 
aching that 
Gregory Van 
Houten had 
started and 
that would 
never be 
appeased. 
Not for one 
instant did 
she forget 
that Greg- 
o r y was 
her one 
love; not 
for one 
minute did 
she lose the 
t r e m-u lous 
hope that one 
day he would 
come back to 
her — that the} 
would return to 
the Villa Rosa, at 
the end of the haw- 
thorn lane, and the 
nightmare she was liv- 
ing would fade away. 

It was Gregory who, ,., 
last, tore the last scale from her $^^ 
eyes — shattered the faith she ^ 
had held so fast to ; took from 
life and from love, from heaven 
and from earth, the garment of illu- 
sion the years of her childhood had 
given her. He sued her for divorce and 
named James Hanley as co-respondent. 
It took the family lawyer the better 
part of a day to make her understand 
just what it all meant. He afterward 



admitted it to be the hardest job he had 
tackled in many a legal year — '"like tell- 
ing a child there is no Santa Claus," he 
said, "or a nun that there is no God. I 
believe I took from the girl the core 
of her life that day." 
up her arms Gregory came to see her 
ng to him that night. In her black 
gown, with her gold hair 
and her white, great-eyed 
face, she looked like some 
angel that earth has 
stunned. "Yo u 
know," she told 
him, swiftly, hurt- 
dly — "you must 
know, if you 
know anything 
of me at all, 
that what you 
are doing is 
a great, great 
wrong. Oh, 
Gregory — I, 
who have 
loved you 
so " 




at 



The man 
laughed 
and lit a 
c i g a ret. 
Jean no- 
ticed, quite 
irrelevantly, 
that his hands 
trembled, and 
that, as the 
flame lit up his 
face, there were 
pouches under his 
eyes. Just as irrele- 
vantly she thought of 
Hazel Davidson and her 
super-daring gowns. To 
Jean there was coming a sinis- 
ter understanding of many 
things — of men and of women, 
of the city and its ways, of love 
and its ghastly parodies. 
"You have loved me so," he was 
saying, "that it has taught you quite 
successfully how to love another. Women 
do not motor with a man to out-of-the- 
way inns, wear his flowers, accept his 
caresses, for the love of — their hus- 
bands, you know. It cannot be possible 




THE DEVIL'S PAY DAY 



111 



that you expect me to believe that!" 
The girl, who had become a woman, 
looked at him steadily. "I want to tell 
you something," she said, "and then I am 
thru — with you — and with many things. 
"When you came into my life — down there 
— it was full — full of the happiness that 
flowers bring — sunshine and birds — 
work and books — the simple 
things. You infused into it and /gi 
into me the strangeness and need ^* 
of love — man's love. When you 
had accomplished your 
purpose, when you 
had had of me 
all that you 
wanted, 



will remember me and this hour. I did 
take James Hanley's flowers ; I did motor 
with him to places away from town — 
places where it was green, and cool, and 
still — places something like — down there. 
You did see him trying to kiss me — you 
never saw him kiss me. And all these 
things were only because I was 
lonely — so lonely — I failed to 
understand. I understand 
now — perfectly — so per- 
fectly I can never be fooled 
again ; but I think — I am 
sure — that I will be 
able to make — 
fools — of 
others " 





THE EASY WAY 



-THE 
IN TIME 



left me — alone — with the need ^ 



the love of you left. I did not 
understand then what I have 
come to understand in this day — in 
this hour — the complexity of man's rela- 
tions with woman — the horridness of the 
world's eyes — the bitter unfairness of a 
society that will condemn on circumstan- 
tial evidence — for that is what you and 
your world are doing to me. I pray God, 
Gregory, that such a thing will never 
happen to you, and that if it does you 



FOOL-KILLING WAY- 
BECAME HERS 



(0 Van Houten moveci uneasily ; 
then he smiled. After all, it 
was easier than he had expected — 
this getting rid of his "dairymaid 
wife." Me crossed the room and extended 
his hand. "Good-by," he said; "I'm glad 
you're taking it in a sportsmanlike way. 
I'm sorry it has had to be unpleasant. 1 

hope you and Hanley will " 

He paused. The great, violet eyes were 
welling with tears. In this last moment 
memory rose up and smote her hard — 



112 



THE DEVIL'S PAY DAY 



smote her tender heart for the last time. 
She raised up her arms and clung to him, 
suddenly, fiercely. "Gregory," she mur- 
mured brokenly, "it is — isn't it? — all a 
mistake — a terrible joke — down there — 

all that you said — dearest — dear " 

An instant later she stood alone in the 
room. The front door banged. Then 
there was silence. Jean stood motionless. 
Then she laughed, and in the sound there 
was something curiously like Hazel 
Davidson. 

Two weeks later Jean faced James 
Hanley at a table in the Claridge. 

"So you did come back?" he was ask- 
ing for the hundredth time. "After all — 
you did come back!" 

"Yes," she laughed, "I did come back 
— not particularly because I wanted to, 
you know, but because they wouldn't 
have me — down there. My people — 
and divorce — and co-respondents — dont 
wince, James ; it's true — do not sit well 
together. I did not fit in any more — 
down there. I have become of the town 
and its ways now. I have been drawn 
into the game. Suppose we play it out to 
the end?" 

The man leaned toward her over the 
table. "It's a go!" he breathed. "Let's 
drink to it — here's how!" 

The man in the Palm Beach chair 
shaded his eyes from the blind of the sea 
and turned to his companion. ''Anything 
new at the hotel, Jim?" he asked, with a 
wink. 

"Yes" — the other man roused himself 
a bit — "for this hole-in-the-ground there's 
the best looker I've seen anywhere out- 
side of — Budapest." 

"Go on; I'm listening." 

"Oh, I only caught a glimpse. Daz- 
ling blonde, superb carriage, smile like an 
angel's, eyes like a devil's — violet eyes 
with wicked lights in them — some 
queen !" 

The two men relapsed into silence. 
Gregory Van Houten was thinking. The 
last time he had been ordered away for 
his health he had become involved with 
a pair of violet eyes — it had been a seri- 
ous involvement. It was all over now — 
five years ago — ended decorously in the 
divorce court. He and Hazel had mar- 



ried immediately after, and he had lost 
track of the owner of the violet eyes. 
He supposed he and Hazel had been 
happy. He had been thinking, of late, 
that he had better look up the definition 
of happiness in the dictionary — he was so 
damnably ennuied all the time — the same 
old thing, the same old crowd, the same 
old scandals, with an occasional change 
of actors — the same old days and nights. 
After all, the freshest, most poignant 
memory he had was of a cottage at the 
end of a hawthorn lane. Diablc! but life 
was a monotone ! 

"Here she comes now," his friend was 
whispering in his ear. "By Jove! she's a 
winner!" 

Gregory raised his head. He stared. 
Then he* dropped back into his chair 
again and invoked the deities to witness. 
It was Jean — Jean taken by Life and 
pruned and shaped and modernized and 
rarely beautified ; Jean born again. 

She was coming toward him, and he 
rose from his chair. He felt surprised at 
himself. He could have sworn that noth- 
ing on earth would have roused him from 
that chair — much less a woman. "How 
do you do?" he said. 

It began all over again, then and there 
— only there was a difference — something 
had gone from the quality of Jean's atti- 
tude. The eager sincerity was lacking; 
somehow she did not care in the same old 
desperate way. She cared more as he had 
cared himself — perhaps not so much. 
The whole thing was he did not know 
how she did care ; he could not solve her 
at all. Outside and beyond the gorgeous- 
ness of her beauty, she was impalpable, 
vague, maddening. 

There came to them again May dawn- 
ings and the bird-calls, nights under 
the silver-gilt ' moon, trysts in ' aisled 
woods ; there came to Gregory, at least, 
the old love intensified. 

"Who has said love cannot be re- 
caught?" he told her once. "Even after 
all that we went thru together ; even 
after Hazel — and Hanley — we come to- 
gether again — this time forever, my love. 
Listen" — he caught her to him, and she 
felt, for the first time, the loud thudding 
of his heart — saw, for the first time, the 
dross of self wiped out of his eyes — heard, 
for the first time, the strained note of 



THE DEVILS PAY DAY 



113 



sheer want in his tones — "a man does not 
forget — his wife. I know now that I 
have never forgotten )ou. I went back 
to the things I had been used to ; your 
newness — your difference — I could not 
understand. But now — oh, Jean, my one 

love, my one, true love " 

A bird over their close heads stopped 
singing. Such a laugh came from the 
woman beneath him that his song was 
stopped in his throat. "You 
fool!*' she was sayine: 




"To live — with men such as you — to 
swim and not to sink — one must learn — 
the rules of the game." 

Gregory stepped toward her. The 
veins on his forehead stood out ; his 
hands twisted like a satyr's. "Then we'll 
discard the game, at last," he said; "we'll 
get back to first principles — we " 

"We will." broke in a decisive voice, 
and James Hanley's hand flung him back. 
They reverted to type — there in the aisled 
woods. Like primitive men they gripped 
and wrestled, and rose 
and fell. 



IT BEGAN ALL OVER AGAIN, THEN AND THERE 



&** 

'# 



"you silly, silly fool ! You steal my 
youth — my faith — my dreams — my peace ; 
you plunder me right and left of every- 
thing there is worth while in life ; then, 
after years, you come to me and drivel, 
'My one love — my true love — this is the 
real love ! Gregory, Gregory — even the 
high gods laugh !" 

The man stared at her. ''Then you 
have been playing these last days," he 
said, slowly, ''like all the other painted 
dolls — you have been playing — with 
me " 

"Like all the others," she acquiesced. 



And the woman, watch- 
ing, one jeweled hand to the lace on her 
breast, cried out to Van ITouten to spare 
the man who had, after all, made life 
possible for her — who had worshiped her 
consistently — who had not left her to the 
dregs, alone. 

Down the path they twisted and ran, 
and came back, and went on. Jean fol- 
lowed them, begging, pleading. "You 
are within sight of the hotel," she cried; 
"come into the room — dont create a scene 
here." 

Once insid r lier room, the men started 



114 



THE DEVIL'S PAY DAY 



again — Gregory had the upper hand, and 
Hanley was losing out. He was the older 
man, and his years were against him. A 
sudden desperation seized Jean. Was this 
man, Van Houten, to rob her life again 
of all that, after all, there was in it? 

She seized the gun Hanley had given 
her for clay-pigeon shooting. "Take it," 
she cried, hysterically, trying to press its 
stock into his gnarled fist, "take it — your 
last chance Oh, my God, my God !" 



the death sentence at all. His mind was 
hearing and seeing other things : a cot- 
tage at the end of a hawthorn lane — 
the strong odor of mown hay under a 
May dawn — violet eyes all full of faith 
and love — violet eyes struck dumb with 
hurt and pain — a voice saying, "I pray 
God, Gregory, that such a thing will never 
happen to you — and that if it does you 
will remember me — and this hour." He 
fainted. Memory's hour had struck. 




"YES ,1 KILLED HIM," HE SAID "YOU WIN !" 



When the officers reached the room, 
Hanley was lying in a great pool of his 
heart's blood — Jean was shrunken into a 
corner of the room, nerveless, speechless. 
Over the dead man stood Van Houten 
with the gun thrust into his hand. "Yes, 
I killed him," he said, and, as they took 
him out, his eyes said to the stricken 
woman, "You win !" 

They convicted him — on purely circum- 
stantial evidence. But he did not hear 



In the room of a hotel not far away, a 
woman fainted, too; and as her white 
lids closed over her eyes they were sterile 
of faith and dreams — barren of hope and 
prayer — two dumb things, haunted and 
wild. 

From the wrecked lives and crushed 
hearts— the still-born hopes and ashes of 
desires — the futile prayers and faiths 
gone bad: — the sin-stained souls — he takes 
his horrid pay. 




^yytfiU 




^enft. 



it th, 



PAPER CUT-OUTS OF POPULAR PLAYERS FOR THE CHILDREN 

PEARL WHITE 

trie K,~^ fJjj U , , e ,. ' then c , ut dotted lme »n hat and slip over 

the head, h old base on dotted line to make figure stand 



Climb Out of Yourself and Look Yourself 

Over! 

Rut-Commuters, Grouches, Desk-Slaves— Try a Limerick and 
Spread Your Wings of Fancy 



THE MIRROR OF VILLAINY 
T Te admits he's fair of feature, and would make the sort of 
creature 
That most girls would like to treasure for their own; 
But in a Motion Picture story, he doesn't yearn for glory, 

For his heart is most deceitful, and his breast is made of stone; 
To him it doesn't matter, whose ideal he has to shatter, 

If he plans to have your fortune or to take from you your wife; 
He'll engage in pleasant chatter, while he's using subtle flatter, 
He'll shake your hand, and try to take your life ! 

N. L. 




STUART HOLMES 



Once there was a city man — a flat-dweller — who stood still in the middle of the 
street and gazed up at the majestic moon. A crowd collected around him. 
"What's doing aloft?" they asked. "I am looking at the moon," he said; "how 
beautiful it is !" Thereupon they all laughed and scattered, preferring the bright 
shop-windows a-sparkle with imitation jewels. 

Again, there was a woman — a slip of a- girl — who spread her wings of gossamer 
and steel and flew over the fro^c. river-beds across half the continent. Neither the 
flat-dweller nor tb$ nying girl were crazy — they had simply climbed out of themselves; 
scorned che beaten path. 

This brings us around to the Limerick. Would you like to climb out of yourself 
— miles away from the ledger, the gas-range, and the typewriter — and give free rein 
to your fancy? The body is only the hangar of the poetic soul! Go to it! Put 
every aching care aside and chase a Limerick thru the clouds. Each month we 
dispense $12 for the brightest ones — in flights of $5 and $3 each, and four little 
skips of $1 each. Those who have spread their wings the best this month and have 
captured the sky-prizes are, in the order named: Nanna Lynch, Arthur Lenox, Mary 
E. Rouse, Mary A. Koch, Frederick Wallace and M. H. Toner. 



EDITOR, PLEASE PAGE "PEGGY"! 

Vuss" to precious "Peg" Hy- 



HERE 



ERE s a 
land, 

Into filmdom she dropped straight from 
skyland ; 
A light o' the screen, 
A moviedom queen, 
Some day I'll, draft Hyland to Myland ! 
M. B. Sherard. 
Belton, South Carolina. 



WANTED— AN UNSUSCEPTIBLE 
HERO! 
f\H, somebody write us a play, 
^ > ^ For a bracer, just once in a way; 
Where our hero wont fall 
For her wriggles at all, 
When the vampire dame stalks him for 
prey. 

Lizzie Cheney Ward. 
958 Acoma St., Denver, Colo. 



116 



CLIMB OUT OF YOURSELF AND LOOK YOURSELF OVER 



117 



HOPE SHE DOESN'T HAVE TO DIE 
TO PLAY IT ! 

J\yriss Valentine Grant, so I read, 
1V1 A harp has received, yes, indeed, 

From a fan, and I think, 

As I say with a wink — 
' 'Tis just what an angel would need!" 
Harry J. Smalley. 

1207 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 




HAZEL DAWN 

FOR SHAME, HAZEL! 
O aid the big, yellow moon with a yawn, 
^ "Little Stars, why so pale and so 
wan?" 
''Aint it awful," sighed they, 

"We must fade and turn gray 

Not a 'Star' has a chance* with the 
'Dawn' !" 

Emma Stewart Card. 
901 13th Ave., Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

H(E) ART-SICK! 
A pretty young thing from Brazil 
/ ~*> Was nuts on a fellow called Bill; 
Tho she used all her art, 

Yet she couldn't win Hart 

And now she's reported quite ill ! 

Nanna Lynch. 
132a Danforth St., Portland, Me. 




BITOT 
OT2URH 



PROSPECTS! 

Dryant Washrurn, proud "Daddy of 

Stands a chance to be sire of a score; 

I wonder if he 

Has "ambish" to be 
"Bryant I" of a hundred or more! 

William C. Parkhurst. 
Winters, Yolo Co., Cal. 




WILLIAM S. HART 



118 CLIMB OUT OF YOURSELF AND LOOK YOURSELF OVER! 




CHARLES 



(SPENCER) 
WOW! 



CHAPLIN! 



J Tis name in the middle is Spencer, 
A A For fitting our Charles it's immense, 
sir; 
It is nearly all "pence," 
Which is Charlie's sixth sense; 
He clings to the coin, does this gent, sir ! 
Mary E. Rouse. 
1942 Warren Ave., Chicago, 111. 




CHARLES CHAPLIN 



A 



THIS BEING LEAP YEAR. 
handsome young Spaniard named 
Tony 

Had studied well up on Marconi; 
From a lady one day 
Came this wireless to say, 
"I should like to propose matrimony." 
M. H. Toner. 
533 E. 144th St., New York, N. Y. 

"HEAD-ON" HELEN. 

When fellows watch Helen Holmes, 
They simply go nuts in their domes 
When she jumps from a hack 
To a railroad train's back 
And over its spine calmly roams. 

Nell Yancy. 
Bakersfield, Cal. 



"THE OLD MAN O' THE MOVIES!" 

Charlie Kent, in your hair there is rime, 
But j^our acting is splendid and 
prime ; 
As old wine, that the test 
Of the years proves the best, 
So your art is enripened by Time ! 

Harry J. Smalley. 
1207 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



L 



THE ANSWER MAN. 
et 'em rave over Kerrigan's frizzes, 
And the hit Bushman makes with the 
Lizzes ; 
They're fine, I agree, 
But the hero for me 
Is the fellow who tackles those quizzes. 
Frederick Wallace. 
Bristol, Conn. 




AFTER A STRUGGLE— YES! 

There was a young Jap from Nabisoo, 
Who said to his girlie, "I'll kiss 
'oo" ; 
But she sized him up well, 
Then let out a yell: 
"You can — but you'll have to use jit soo !" 
Marcelene Michael. 
17 Penn. Ave. S., Cumberland, Md. 



ELECTRICITY" DOUG. 



airbanks, 



th( 



of 



SESSUE HAYAKAWA 



DOUGLAS 
hour, 
He looms above all like a tower; 
He's the best in the bunch, 
For he's there with the punch 
And he draws like a thousand 
power. 

Arthur Lenox. 
Lock Box 1214, Washington, D. C. 



horse- 




DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS 



CLIMB OUT OF YOURSELF AXD LOOK YOURSELF OVER! 119 




THEDA BARA 

SHE'S A BUD! 

There was an old maid quite narrow, 
Who never would look at a sparrow, 
Unless fully dressed 
When he came from his nest — 
I wish she could see Theda Bara ! 

M. C. Moloney. 
1227 E. 44th PL, Chicago, 111. 





J. WARREN KERRIGAN 



57 EXPRESSIONS (NOT PICKLED). 
A clever young lady is Grace, . 
*~* Whose very remarkable face 
Can look sweet or sad,. 
Or happy or mad, 
In one short minute of space! 

Hattie Clark. 
Stromsburg, Neb. 

A JURY OF WOMEN COULDN'T 

CONVICT KERRIGAN! 
T^aith, I dont know how to begin, 
A Whin I think of that shtrong, noble 
chin, 
Wid his big Irish eyes, 
And a shmile like the skies, 
Sure, me heart is entirely "all in!" 

Mary A. Kocn. 
30 N. Dorcas St., Lewistown, Pa. 

AND SHE'S PAID TO DO IT, TOO! 

(Beverly Bayne) 
Wou're the luckiest one of our sex, 
A Your job I would like to annex — 
Pretty soft for you, dear, 
To be kist and held near 
The heart of that sweet Francis X ! 

Mary E. Rouse. 
1942 Warren Ave., Chicago, 111. 



Max Under Comes Back ! 

By CLEMENT F. CHANDLER 

(Continued from the February number) 



"¥ was indifferent with the brush, so I 
was sent to a musical conservatory. 
But I did not wish to study music. 
I wanted to be an actor. 

"I was the naughty boy. I pretended 
to go to the music college, but instead 
attended a dramatic school. At the end 
of the year I won the first prize. 

"Ah ! what you say — the cat was out of 
the bag? If I had been smaller, my 
father would have spanked me. As it 
was, he gave permission to go on with 
my study. 

"At nineteen I was engaged to play in 
the Classic Theater. I played in 'Cyrano 
de Bergerac' and 'Le Romanesque.' Then 
I went to Paris, where I was on the stage 
several years. Afterward I toured 
Europe. 

"I was. becoming interested in the si- 
lent drama, and, while still on the stage, 
gave part of my time to this work. At 
twenty-seven I quit the stage altogether 
to work for the cinema. 

"Later I established my own theater 
at twenty-four Boulevard Poissoniere. I 
am- now building a fine theater there. 
My films that I make in America will be 
shown there. 

"Then came the war. I offered my 
car and my services to the minister of 
war. I carried dispatches to the front. 

"No, I was not an officer, monsieur. 
I was a private. The man with military 
experience should be the officer and is. 
We were glad to serve in the ranks. 

"I carried many dispatches. What 
they were and to whom, that I cannot 
tell. Those are military secrets, monsieur. 

"I can tell that one night, not twenty- 
five miles from Paris, there was a shot 
in the dark when I was going fifty miles 
an hour without a headlight. 

"I was past the trenches on the way 
to a scouting party in advance. The 
soldier beside me slid forward in his seat. 
His shoulders shook, and he was still. 
I could not take my hand from the 
wheel, monsieur, to learn whether he was 
living or dead. Dispatches must be 
delivered. 

"We took my comrade out of the ma- 



chine, dead, monsieur. We dug a hole 
with sticks and our bare hands and we 
buried him. It is the fortune of a 
soldier, monsieur. 

"I was driving thru Vailly Soissons 
with important dispatches. They were 
not delivered. A shell struck one hun- 
dred feet in front of my car and plowed 
thru the road. I stopped on the brink 
of a gap ten feet deep. I crawled out 
of my car and hid behind a wall. There 
was another shell. It struck just behind 
my machine, and it was blown to atoms. 

"A scouting party approached. My 
comrade and I — for there are two, in the 
hope that one may get thru — ran to the 
creek, a few hundred yards away. We 
jumped into the water up to our necks. 
There we stayed while the)' searched 
for us. They crossed the bridge. It 
was dark. They did not see us. 

"In the morning our own soldiers 
came up, and the scouting" party re- 
treated. I was taken back to Paris. I 
was ill. I was very ill, monsieur. I had 
contracted pneumonia from hours in the 
cold water. I lay in the hospital for 
w r eeks. 

"When I was fit for service, I was as- 
signed to the Thirteenth Regiment by 
General Gallieni. I was in the light 
artillery. The guns are mounted on 
motor vehicles, which charge ahead of 
the foot-soldiers. They clear the way for 
the bayonets after the big guns have 
done their work. 

"The charges? They are terrible, but 
they are inspiring, monsieur. We were 
all excitement. We 'rode hell for 
leather,' not caring whether we lived or 
died. 

"But we could laugh, monsieur. It 
was necessary to laugh to relieve the 
tension. It is just as necessary for the 
busy people in America to laugh to re- 
lieve them from the strain of business 
cares. ■ That is why they go to the 
cinema. 

"We laughed when a crow in the 
fields was repulsed by its mate. Our 
comrades were dying. We would be 
It was necessary, 



120 



next, but we laughed 




MAX UNDER, FAMOUS FRENCH ACTOR, NOW WITH ESSANAY 

1 £ L 



122 



MAX UNDER COMES BACK! 



as I have said, monsieur. It was not 
laughter because there was any laughter 
in the situation. That was entirely seri- 
ous. We felt the terrible havoc. But 
our nerves must be relieved, or we go 
mad. 

"My turn came. It was in the battle 
of the Aisne. A bullet sped thru my 
lung. I plunged from the truck. I 
knew nothing. 

"After hours I was picked up and sent 
to the hospital. It was months before I 
was able to rejoin the service. 

"I was slight of build for the artillery 
service, so I was assigned to an aeroplane 
squad. But I could not fly high, mon- 
sieur. Once it was necessary for me to 
rise to a great altitude. The change in 
air-pressure affected my lung. 

"One night there was a call for eleven 
of the squad to carry out a commission. 



I was among them, but the army surgeon 
ordered me not to go. That is .why I 
am here today, monsieur. The others 
never came back. What happened to 
them no one knows. They never have 
been heard from — my brave comrades. 

"I was sent back to the Contrexville 
hospital, and it was there I was asked 
to come to America. 

"It was the inspiration. I had seen all 
the sorrows of the world. T will now 
try to bring more joy into it,' I said. 
So I agreed to come to America. Here I 
am, monsieur. I have never been in 
America before. But I am back work- 
ing for the screen, working to make 
people laugh, monsieur. I hope to suc- 
ceed. I used to do this. I think I am 
more capable now. It is as it will be, 
monsieur. I have had my sobs — now I 
will laugh with my audience.'' 



Defilmnitions 

From the Studio Dictionary 
By JOSEPH F. POLAND 



Extra Actor : One of the many who 
are called, but from whom few are 
• chosen by the director. Synonym, 
super. 

Artist: An actor who has drawing 
power. 

Director: The general who, marshal- 
ling his forces, attacks the scenario, and 
fights, persuades, bullies, threatens, pleads 
with every one around him until he has 
produced a photoplay. 

Location : Something which the as- 
sistant director must find, be it at the 
bottom of a well, on top of a church 
steeple, or the roof of the Woolworth 
Building. One reason why the A. D. 
dislikes the scenario writer who calls for 
"odd" locations. 

Motion Picture Magazine: The 
organ which holds, as 'twere, a mirror 
to the movies, and reflects everything of 
interest to the fans. 

Photoplay: The finished product of 
many hands, hearts and brains, which has 
taken much time, pains and money to pro- 
duce, and is then run off on a screen 
before you in a few minutes, for a small 
admission. Dont knock it, appreciate it ! 

Scenario Writer: The man respon- 



sible for the scenario, who has to use the 
eloquence of a Cicero and a Demosthenes 
combined, to persuade the director to 
leave intact some of the original story. 

Scenario Editor: A man who has 
more to worry about in a day than most 
people have in a month. And the worst 
of his worries are not the letters from 
the would-be writers, but the stars who 
must have a suitable part immediately ! 

Star: The darling of the film gods, 
who is allowed -all prerogatives, even 
to the extent of indulging in "tem- 
perament." 

Temperament: Sole property of the 
stars and a few directors. Manifesta- 
tions are varied and numerous, ranging 
from desperate rumpling of curly locks 
to utter inability to work. Only known 
cure: Absolute surrender on part of 
opposition. 

Technical Director: The man who 
has to know what kind of parlors and 
dungeons have been in use from Noah's 
time on, how they were furnished, whether 
wall-clocks or wrist-watches were used, 
and also what kind of lace gentlemen 
wore on their cuffs and ladies on their 
pantalets. 



Our Cover Girl — Violet Mersereau 



r begin with, she smiled at me over 
the telephone. What — a girl cant 
smile over the telephone? That 
just goes to show how little you know 
about Violet 
Mersereau. I 
insist that she 
can and she 
did. The smile 
was tacked 
onto an invita- 
tion to come 
right up. An 
ebony elevator- 
boy, clanging 
open the door 



By CAROL LEE 

of the cage, volunteered the information 
that Miss Mersereau's room was right 
down the corridor. It was a little dim 
and gloomy in the long corridor, for it 



was five o'clock 

in the afternoon 

— a gloom}", 

rainy afternoon, 

and twilight was 

settling swiftly. 

Then, suddenly, 

somebody 

switched on the 

ights. A bit 

(Continued on 

page 152) 




m 



GREENROOM 




The ranks of the "Only Their Husbands" 
Club of Los Angeles has been sadly 
decimated recently by the leave-taking 
of Wallace Reid, who has gone to Denver 
with Kenneth McGaffey; and Owen Moore 
and Thomas Meighan, who are with New 
York Famous Players; also Lou-Tellegen, 
beginning his theatrical season. This club, 
as the name indicates, is composed of fa- 
mous men who have married more famous 
women, and in the club they are known by 
the names of their wives: "Mr. Geraldine 
Farrar" (Lou-Tellegen), "Mr. Mary Pick- 
ford" (Owen Moore), "Mr. Marie Doro" 
(Elliott Dexter), and so on. Only Mr. 
Marie Doro is left to hold the fort at Lasky 
Lane. 

One of the most notable of recent , screen 
converts is Margaret Illington, who has 
deserted Broadway, New York, to listen to 
the lure of the camera, out at Laskyville. 
Miss Illington will be housed in the same 
"bungalow" that was used by Geraldine Far- 
rar last summer. Her first picture will 
be "The Inner Shrine." 

Little Georgie Stone, Fine Arts' 
five-year-old dramatic artist, is 
confined to his bed with a severe 
attack of grippe, contracted while 
doing a scene up to his waist in 
water. "I dont care," says Georgie, 
dauntlessly; "it was a great scene." 

A great piece of news to photoplay 
and stage fans alike is that, at last, 
one of the greatest actresses has con- 
sented to "pose for the camera." Max- 
ine Elliott, the beautiful, has signed a 
contract with Goldwyn and will be under 
the same direction as little Mae Marsh. 

Marguerite Clayton announces the acqui- 
sition of ten elaborate and complete wed- 
ding trousseaux. What does she need with 
so many? Why, she is doing the lead in a 
series, "Is Marriage Sacred?" in which she 
is married ten times, each time being fur- 
nished with a complete trousseau. So if 
Marguerite wants to prove, in real life, 
whether marriage really is sacred, she 
wont have to bother about dressmakers and 
dresses. 

And here's the regular monthly crop of 
serials: Mollie King begs to attract your 
attention to "The Double Cross," which she 
is giving Pathe (for release), and Dar- 
win Karr and Ethel Grandin have al- 
ready started work on "The Lure of 
Gold." Which reminds one that Ethel 
is a busy little body, since she has just 
finished helping Maurice Costello solve 
"The Crimson Stain Mystery." 




JOTTINGS 




MARY MILES 
MINTER 




Annette Kellermann is proud as a pea- 
cock these days. 'Cause why? 'Cause she has 
just received a coral necklace, measuring ten 
feet, from the Jamaicans who worked in 
"A Daughter of the Gods." Every bead in 
the necklace was collected by the donors of 
the unique ornament, and not one piece had 
been artificially carved or polished. 

Mary Pickford is going to receive all 
kinds of support in her next picture, "The 
Poor Little Rich Girl." In the cast are 
such well-known players as Madeline Trav- 
erse, Charles Wellesley, Gladys Fairbanks 
and Frank McGlynn. "The Poor Little Rich 
Girl" in its stage-play dress was Viola 
Dana's best starring vehicle. Gladys Fair- 
banks also appeared in the stage produc- 
tion. Maurice Tourneur, as usual, will 
direct Little Mary and her company. 

"So they were married and lived hap- 
ily ever afterwards." Mae Murray has 
just said "I will" to a question from J. 
Jay O'Brien, a well-known New Yorker, 
who has been wooing the bright .little 
luminary for several years. If possible, 
Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien will spend their 
honeymoon in New York, where they 
are both well-known and liked. 
William Russell's last play — pardon, 
his latest play — is called "The Twink- 
ler," and was written by Henry Lev- 
erage, a prisoner at Sing Sing. The story 
was originally published in The Star 
of Hope, the prison paper, and later 
purchased by American. A full set of 
"stills" and straight photographs of the 
players have been forwarded to the author. 
Mary Miles Minter rode into the fashion- 
able horse show at Santa Barbara recently 
and "copped" two prizes for horsemanship. 
Miss Minter wears her laurels with her 
usual charming modesty. 

Marguerite Clayton has become a "cham- 
peen" skater. During Chicago's recent "cold 
snap" the management of Miss Clayton's 
hotel had the roof flooded, and on the re- 
sultant two-inch ice Miss Clayton has been 
having the time of her life. 

Kitty Gordon's latest play bears the title 
"The Haunting Shadow." Whereupon the 
Greenroom Editor rises to remark that if the 
shadow is Kitty's, there's 'many a mere man 
willing — nay, even eager — to be haunted! 

Cupid makes a goal! (He usually does, 
as far as that's concerned.) This time 
the American studio, at Santa Barbara, 
was the scene of operations. Harvey 
Clarke, "heavy" man, and Ethel 
Ullman, Inceville ingenue, were 
the victims. 





ottee whisperings; 

FROM EVERYWHERE 
,IJi,PLAYERDOM 



up 
dars: 



All students of the 
constellations are ad- 
vised to tack the following 
beside their February calen- 
Ethel Barrymore will be seen 
in "Egypt, the Gypsy," Edward Shel- 
don's famous play, in which Margaret 
Anglin first appeared; Jane Grey will 
delight the optic nerves in "When My 
Ship Comes In"; Valkyrien will float 
across our gaze in "The Image Maker of 
Thebes"; and Clara Kimball Young will 
show us "The Easiest Way." 

And now for a few "flashes" at current 
"movie-movers": Edna Goodrich has capit- 
ulated to the check-book of Mutual; George 
Fisher has vanished from the Lockwood- 
Allison combination to make love to Mary 
Miles Minter: Marguerite Snow, our "Zu- 
dora," will return as Josie, opposite George 
M. Cohan, in "Broadway Jones"; and Fox 
has annexed Billie Ritchie. 

The diary of Suzette Booth, which has 
been running in the Motion Picture Maga- 
zine for the past two months, has Los An- 
geles "all het up" over Miss Booth's 
caustic comments on the "Golden City 
The newspapers have taken it up, 
and all the girls are up in arms to 
defend the fair name of their city. 

Who says there are hard times in 
a scenario writer's life? Jack Cun- 
ningham wrote and sold six scripts 
to Universal in one week. Then he 
retired, quietly but firmly, with "la 
grippe." Anthony P. Kelly, a Chicago 
youth of twenty-three years, wrote the 
scenarios for "The Witching Hour," 
"Destiny, or The Soul of a Woman," "The 
Thief," "The Great Divide," and is now a 1 
work on "God's Man." For all his youth, 
Tony is reputed to make more money in a 
year than the President of the United 
States. 

And here's more food for film fans: Fox 
has annexed a number of screen luminaries 
to add to the constellation blazing brilliantly 
in the West. Among them we find Miriam 
Cooper (Mrs. R. A. Walsh), Tom Mix, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ralph Lewis, Francis Carpenter 
and Seena Owen (Mrs. George Walsh). 
Quite a raid on Triangle — eh, wot? 

Maude Fealy has decided to return to the 
screen, and Lasky is to have charge of her 
screen activities. Her first picture will be 
with Theodore Roberts, which reminds one 
that these two played together, years ago, 
in a Denver stock engagement. They spend 
half their leisure time now gossiping of 
the past. 

Frank Borzage has just finished playing 

opposite Mae Murray in "A Mormon 

^ Maid" and is now doing a juvenile 

^y role opposite Fannie Ward, a well- 

3*£^ known actress in the Lasky studio. 





DOUGLAS 
FAIRBAXK 



In February and 
early March a num- 
ber of stars will shine, as fol- 
lows: Constance Talmadge, a 
bright little twinkler who is just 
shining for the first time alone, will 
be seen in "The Girl of the Timber 
Claims"; Frank Keenan in a weird but 
gripping Southern story, "The Bride of 
Hate"; Edith Storey and Antonio Moreno 
in "Captain Sunlight"; Ethel Clayton in 
"Bondage of Fear"; Charlie Chaplin in 
"Easy. Street." 

Mme. Olga Petrova will move her gowns, 
her gorgeous hats and her temperament out 
to the Lasky studio in California. In the 
meanwhile, the Lasky press-agent is work- 
ing himself into an early grave trying to 
invent more incredible stories about her 
"stupendous and e-e-normous" salary. Oh 
well, stars come high, you know! 

Here's sad news for movie fans. Douglas 
Fairbanks has left the Triangle Company, 
alleging violation of contract. He claims 
that his contract called for a supervision of 

his pictures by David W. Griffith and 
that this has not been done. He also 
objects to having a new leading 
woman for every picture — "an effort 
by the company to establish a value 
to the names of unknown actresses 
by connecting them with mine, in vio- 
lation of my contract," as the genial 
'Doug" expressed it. 
But perhaps this nice news will help 
to allay your disappointment over the 
i other. We beg to announce Mary Ful- 
ler's return to the screen, with the 
Lasky Company, playing opposite Lou- 
Tellegen in "The Long Trail," and a series 
of others, production to be made in Cali- 
fornia. Miss Fuller is one of the wealthiest 
actresses of the screen, having cleaned up 
a small fortune in Wall Street at the open- 
ing of the war. 

A few more shiftings of planetary terri- 
tory: Gail Kane to American-Mutual; Mary 
Nash to World; Jane Cowl to Goldwyn; 
Winifred Kingston to Fox, and her old 
screen-partner, Dustin Farnum; Alan For- 
rest to Famous Players; George Fisher to 
American, opposite Mary Miles Minter. 

Marguerite Snow has at last capitulated 
to the screen. She will be leading woman 
opposite George M. Cohan, Uncle Sam's 
nephew, in his first screen venture, "Broad- 
way Jones." 

A brightening of stars will be noted, 'long 
about the middle of January "or Feb- 
ruary, as follows: Henry Walthall 
in "Little Shoes"; Bessie Love in 
"The Doll Shop"; Margarita Fischer 
in "The Devil's Assistant"; Herbert 
Rawlinson in "Eagle's Wings"; and 
Viola Dana in "The Mortal Sin." 




LITTLE~"""WHISPERING S 
~ FROM EVERYWHERE 



Popular Plays and 
Players' studio was 
almost entirely destroyed by 
fire recently. Mme. Petrova's 
company was hard at work at the 
time, all the players and other folk 
at work escaping safely. Mme. Petro- 
va's entire wardrobe was destroyed, 
along with that of many lesser players. 
Just as we go to press comes the news 
of the illness of Herbert Brenon. The 
popular and famous director had been 
working very hard, and finally collapsed. 
Reports come from the hospital that his 
condition is too critical to give much hope 
of recovery. 

If Theda Bara will promise to be a good 
little girl and sign the horrid contract Mr. 
Fox offers her, he will reward her by send- 
ing her to Egypt in the spring, where she 
may frolic in the sands and renew a child- 
hood acquaintance with the Sphinx and the 
pyramids — and, incidentally, do some am- 
bitious pictures. 

Roscoe Arbuckle has left Keystone and, 
if rumor runneth rightly, will travel East 
and sign his name to a contract with 
the Paramount Company. It is ex- 
pected that he will begin to produce 
two-reel comedies about March 1st. 
Blanche Sweet has left the Lasky 
Company, her contract having ex- 
pired. She will leave for London, for 
a short vacation, after which she will 
again listen to offers from film mag- 
nates. The minimum salary she de- 
mands is twelve hundred a week. 

A film company has been formed at 
Las Vegas, N. M., to film the Bible. The 
company will be known as the Bible Film 
Co. Scenarios will be selected by an inter- 
denominational board of ministers, and so 
on, thus insuring the pictures a run in 
churches, Y. M. C. A.'s and colleges, as well 
as ordinary release. 

Charles Ray has signed a new contract, 
insuring his appearance under the Triangle- 
Kay-Bee banner for at least two years more. 
Which is good news to a goodly number of 
the fair sex. 

Helen Holmes has just purchased a car- 
load of the latest improved farm machinery 
and tools, for shipment to her ranch in 
Utah, the "star" of the lot being a gasoline 
tractor. Miss Holmes and her husband, 
J. "Pep" McGowan, are to have a vacation, 
upon the close of 'The Lass of the Lumber- 
lands," in which to visit the ranch and 
oversee the installation of the machinery. 
Ralph Ince, having finished a special en- 
gagement with the Robert Warwick Film 
Company, has just been signed up by 
Goldwyn. He is the first director 
^i* signed by thisnew company, showing 
y^ they are at least starting out right 





JACK WARREN 
KERRIGAN 



\L 




Gale Henry, come- 
dienne with Joker, 
has taken unto herself a 
spouse in the shape of Bruno 
Becker, assistant director to Allen 
Curtis. 

Charlie Chaplin was painfully but not 
seriously hurt in the taking of his new 
release, "Easy Street." 'Tis said that 
Charlie disputed right-of-way with a lam: - 
post, in a scene, and that the lamp-post 
became dislocated, falling across Charlie 
and injuring his face in such a way that he 
will be unable to work until it is quite well. 
In the meantime his company is having a 
vacation and enjoying life. 

Rhea Mitchell has also surrounded her- 
self by articles of incorporation. 

At last! Which means that "The Inde- 
cisions of Jack" have finally been decided. 
The last episode closed when Jack Warren 
Kerrigan signed a nice, sprawly signature 
to a contract for five years' services. He 
will first do a brief vaudeville tour while 
the new studios are being prepared for him. 

He will carry a five-reel Universal feature 
with him, and, after the picture, "will 
speak a piece." 

Viola Dana, Augustus Phillips and 
Robert Walker are en route to Jack- 
sonville, Fla., where they will pro- 
duce their next picture, "A Wife by 
Purchase." 
Earle Foxe has just been engaged by 
Pathe to play the leading role opposite 
Pearl White, she of the Perils. Exploits 
and Army, in a new serial. 

Another prodigal son who has re- 
turned to Vitagraphville is Edward Elkas. 
the character man, who will soon be seen 
playing in Dorothy Kelly's support. 

After an absence of several months, Ned 
Finley, Vitagraph's former "rough stuff" 
and "strong arm" leading man, has signed 
with the Fox Company. 

William S. Hart has recently been cleverly 
cartooned by Fay King, the famous Denver 
sketch-artist. She concluded a letter to 
him by averring: "You get 'em — from the 
seminary to the cemetery!" 

Harry Meyers is about to blossom forth 
as a film magnate with his newly formed 
Encores Pictures. Rosemary Theby will 
continue to co-star with the genial Harry 
in light comedy. 

Mae Marsh may not be a Carnegie, but 
she has her own way of working out effec- 
tive philanthropy. In her coming Goldwyn 
pictures, in which she stars, Miss Marsh 
is going to see to it that one print of 
each of her plays is reserved in each of 
the leading cities, there to be shown to 
poor children of the slums, unable to 
afford an admission fee, absolutely 
free of cost. 




This department is for information of general interest, but questions pertaining to matrimony, relation- 
ship, photoplay writing, and technical matters will not be answered. Those who desire answers by mail, or a 
list or the film manufacturers, must enclose a stamped, addressed envelope. Address all inquiries to "Answer 
Department," writing only on one side of the paper, and using separate sheets for matters intended for other 
departments of this magazine. When inquiring about plays, give the name of the company, if possible. Each 
inquiry must contain the correct name and address of the inquirer at the end of the letter, which will not be 
printed. _ At the top of the letter write the name you wish to appear. Those desiring immediate replies, or 
information requiring research, should enclose additional stamp or other small fee; otherwise all inquiries 
must await their turn. Read all answers and file them — this is the only movie encyclopaedia in existence. 



William F. H.— No, "The Birth of a Na- 
tion" is not playing around here just now. 
Kitty Gordon in World pictures. Herbert 
Standing is with Morosco. I certainly had 
a hard tussle with your bright but very long 
letter. You seem to have aimed at nothing 
and hit it plumb in the middle. 

Kentucky Fan. — Thanks for your very 
kind letter. That Fox was taken in New 
York. Alice Joyce is still with Vitagraph. 

Lillian C. — Thank you. To praise justly 
is to pay an honest debt; to flatter is merely 
a gift. No, it is not necessary to enclose a 
fee when asking questions, but you do get 
your answers much quicker. You see it is 
all on account of the cost of high living. 

Mary Anderson Admirer. — Mrs. Anderson 
is about 40. She is still with Vitagraph. 

Leslie H. Bingo. — Nicholas Dunaew is 
with Universal. Vola Smith, formerly of 
Biograph, has changed her name to Vola 
Vale. She is now with Lasky. Marin Sais 
played the lead in "Lucius Brady." Edgar 
Davenport was Merriman, Iva Shepard was 
Snyder and Ruth Findlay was Dore in "The 
Salamander." So you think Pearl White is 
fickle, just because she had her picture taken 
with two different magazines. Nay, nay, she 
simply wanted an ad from both and got it. 
Arthur Donaldson and Beulah Poynter in 
"Heart of a Hero." Frank Longacre and 
Ethelmary Oakland also played in the above. 

Lima. — I think you refer to the late 
Joseph Brandt of the old Lubin Co. Of 
course there is a Chinatown in San Fran- 
cisco and one in New York. We should 
never be ashamed to admit we are in the 
wrong, because it shows that we are wiser 
today than we were yesterday. 

Pinot, San Juan. — You can reach Anita 
Stewart at the Vitagraph Co., E. 15th St. and 
Locust Ave., Brooklyn. Norma Talmadge 
at 729 7th Ave., New York, c/o Selznick. 
Not quite a thousand. Surely I would like 
to see you; come right along with bells. 

Glad. — William Russell and Irene Howley 
in "The Bondage of Fear" (Biograph). 
That's the only name I know he has, Harold 
Lockwood. Do you want me to scold you? 
Keep in the midst of life. Be among people 
and among things and among troubles and 
difficulties and obstacles; that's the way to 
get a life outfit that wont slide off. 

Dorothy W.— Edward Arnold is with Es- 



127 



sanay. The last picture I know of that 
Wallace Reid played in was "Joan the 
Woman." The first almanac in English was 
published in 1672. 

Tobe of Ft. Worth. — Robert Leonard is 
directing for Lasky. The Classic and Maga- 
zine both have the same editors and are 
published by the same corporation, but 
nothing is repeated in one that has appeared 
in the other. 

H. H. N., Herkimer. — Loraine Huling is 
with Thanhouser. Robert Warwick hails 
from 'Frisco, and is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of California. He is a strikingly 
handsome and talented actor. Among other 
pictures, Mr. Warwick is well known for his 
work in "The Face in the Moonlight," 
"Alias Jimmy Valentine," and "The Man of 
the Hour." 

Spareribs. — Your criticism hurt. Your 
pen is a sword, and a sharp one. There are 
few wild beasts more to be dreaded than a 
talkative person with nothing to talk about. 
Winifred Kingston played opposite Dustin 
Farnum in "The Parson of Panamint." 
Clara Whipple was Lena in "The Revolt." 
Frances Nelson was Anna. 

Sweet Tennessee Girl. — Marguerite Snow 
will play opposite George Cohan in "Broad- 
way Jones" for Artcraft. 

Lorne H., Liverpool. — Your letter was 
very fine. I was glad to know your favor- 
ites. You say that I am immortal. Oh, yes, 
but that wont buy eggs and coal at the 
present prices. 

Plusie. — You can make money much 
easier with health, than you can make 
health with money. Maude Fealy is with 
Lasky. 

Phyllis C. G. — Trouble is right. You 
dont care for Triangle pictures? Zounds! 
what do you want for ten cents? Yes, Mae 
Marsh has left Triangle and gone to Gold- 
wyn, a new company, and Ralph Ince has 
gone with them to direct. 

Mrs. J. F. C. — I really dont know why the 
players are leaving Universal. Warren Ker- 
rigan is going to tour the country for three 
months, and on March 1st he will start a 
company of his own. Margaret Illington 
with Lasky; Morris Foster with Universal. 

Toledo. — Donald Hall was with Ivan last; 
also his wife, Frankie Mann. Blanche 
Sweet has left Lasky to go to London. 



128 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Mollie M. — Oh fie, fie, dont mind a little 
thing like that. Divorces are all the go. 
Yes, Joe Collins her director. Your verse 
was scandalous, not scandaless; I enjoyed 
it. Nothing like a bit of scandal! 

Lyddy, 15. — Be patient and you will get 
ahead of them. Study hard, tho. Zola Telm- 
zart was the girl in "Wall Street Tragedy." 
Kenneth Casey with Metro. Write again. 

Pat. — So you declined a leap-year pro- 



Tom Forman and Mabel Van Buren in "The 
Woman." That's good — about the Irishman 
who said he would rather be a coward ten 
minutes than dead all his life. 

Margarita R. — Zeena Keefe is still with 
Ivan. Winifred Kingston and Dustin Far- 
num are now with the California Fox Co. 
Viola Dana started her stage career when 
she was but 11 years old, appearing in "Rip 
Van Winkle," and since then she has become 




"IF WILLIE HAD BEEN IN ALADDIN'S PLACE ! 



posal from a charming young lady, merely 
because she could not cook and keep house. 
Pshaw! She might have been able to pay 
your board bill! Well I escaped leap year, 
much to my sorrow. 

C. C. N— That's right, trouble is the only 
thing we borrow and want to pay back in 
a hurry. That was an old Edison. 

Olga, 17. — Oh, for a new Isaac Newton, 
who would invent a new law of gravitation 
that would prevent prices going up! Yes, 
Olga Petrova is now with Lasky. 

Katherine G. — You refer to Maciste who 
played in "Cabiria." He can be reached 
thru the Hanover Film Co., Broadway and 
47th St., New York City. Lois Weber and 
Phillips Smalley in "Sunshine Molly" and 



a famous star. She is four feet eleven 
inches tall, weighs 96 pounds, has light 
green eyes and dark brown hair, and her 
favorite pastimes are dancing, swimming 
and motoring. She was born in Brooklyn 
eighteen years ago. 

Marian S., New York. — Yes, I think there 
will be an interview with Sothern, but he 
is very sick just now. See his article in the 
February Classic. 

Maria Rosa M. — I must admit that your 
questions have been answered before. The 
program is revised in my case, and it is 
"youth, idols; manhood, ideals; old age, 
idleness." The mind grows uneasy when 
the chains are taken off, but I keep on the 
chains to prevent skidding. 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



129 



Voonome. — Louise Huff has gone to play 
for Lasky. Yes, Frederick Church has been 
ill. He was operated on for appendicitis. 
Marguerite Clark will play in Artcraft pic- 
tures also. Your letter was long, but in- 
teresting. So long! 

Peggy of Kansas. — Mary Fuller is not 
playing now. Well, whoever lends an easy 
and believing ear to slander is of very bad 
morals, or has no more sense and judgment 
than a child. Put that in your smoke and 
pipe it. Fay Tincher on our next cover. 



Building, New York City. Come now, you 
mustn't ask my name. I'm not allowed out 
of my cage during business hours. Of 
course the dog comes with me. Let me hear 
from you again. 

Jolie, San Francisco. — Yes, we will have 
a chat with Marshall Neilan soon again. 
That's true, but when the Lord endowed 
man with brains, He didn't intend to guar- 
antee them — they grow only by use. 

Boston Fan. — So you're from Boston. You 
refer to Wallace Reid. Florence Marten 




WHO SAID THE MOVIES WERE NOT DOING GOOD? 
Wife — That reminds me, John! I left the faucet turned on in the bathroom. 



Nell K. — So you think it's safe to love a 
man who loves his mother. Naomi Childers 
not playing now. She is writing scenarios. 

Ornette. — That same old question — Doug- 
las Fairbanks' address. You can reach him 
at 1457 Broadway, N. Y., Triangle office. You 
send an ocean of love and a kiss on each 
wave. What could be sweeter? 

Adelaide L. — Your questions are too silly 
to answer. You ought to be spending your 
time trying to better yourself, rather than 
inflicting your wit and wisdom on a poor, 
old, tired Answer Man. 

Ida H. — Yes, the Christie Co. Longacre 



was Alice in "Miss George Washington." 
"Between Men" was a Triangle. William 
Shay in "Prince Omar." Jewel Carmen in 
"Manhattan Madness." "The Flying Tor- 
pedo" was done by Fine Arts. I have an- 
swered you at length, because you said such 
nice things about me. You see a little praise 
goes a long ways. 

Every Week. — Thanks for the clipping. 
You say "The Last Rose of Summer" was 
Arthur Johnson's last picture. Thank you. 

Edith D. — Glad to see you. Send a 
stamped, addressed envelope for a list of 
film manufacturers. Let me hear from you- 



130 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



L. G. S. C— Thanks for yours. Tom Mix 
and Billie Ritchie are both with Fox. Mi- 
gnon Anderson is with Mutual, and Rupert 
Julian is playing in Universal Features. 

Billy Boy. — Marie Dressier played in a 
World picture. I'm afraid there isn't much 
chance of selling photoplays nowadays. All 
the companies have their own scenario 
writers, and they dont buy much from the 
outsider, unless an especially good plot. 




Aviator — Ye gods! We're lost! If this Zeppelin 



ever turns her guns on us! We've got 3,000 feet to 
fall! Think of it! 

The Girl — Is there no way out? 

Aviator — Positively no! We're doomed!! 

Director's Voice — Fine! Now jump out — that 
completes a part of the air scene. Realism and trick 
photography are very hard to tell apart in the 
pictures nowadays. 



Nellie L. — You must think I am a regular 
joke-book. Well, I'm not. I haven't a funny 
bone in my body — not even a funny-bone. I 
dont remember your other letter. 

Toot, 1. — Howard Hickman was Webb in 
"Jungle Child." Thomas Rickett will direct 
Crane Wilbur in features for Horsley. 

W. F. A., Washington. — Peter Land was 
Capt. Ben, Leslie Stowe was the father and 
Martin Faust the ward in "The Dawn of 
Love." Winifred Allen was May in "Seven- 
teen." Hobart Bosworth played in "Oliver 
Twist," also "Joan the Woman" (Lasky). 



You must see the latter; it is a very fine 
picture, and every school-child as well as 
grown-ups should see it. 

Albert K. — Dont remember your last let- 
ter. You should ask the questions again. 

M. Rosalie M. — Yes, my mistake. Edith 
Taliaferro has played in pictures. Some of 
the "Romeo and Juliet" scenes were taken 
at Brighton Beach, N. Y. No, your letter 
was very interesting. Come again, please. 

Querida. — Do you mean the still 
pictures? If so, you can get them 
from us direct. They sell at vari- 
ous prices. She resides at Bush- 
manor, Baltimore, Md. 

Pat. — William Morse was Ar- 
thur in "The Girl with the Green 
Eyes" (Pathe). • Alan Forrest 
with American. Harris Gordon 
now opposite Florence LaBadie. 

Dode. — Of course I receive you 
a bras oaverts. Tom Forman was 
Mr. Carson in "Public Opinion." 
Rita Jolivet in "Unafraid." Edna 
Hunter was Rita in "The Common 
Law." Edwin Carewe and James 
Cruze in "The Snowbird." Yes, 
but worry is rust upon the blade. 
Una M. — He is. William David- 
son in "Pretender." Oh, you are 
simply jealous, and jealousy is 
merely the apprehension of superi- 
ority. I assure you that your ap- 
prehension is unfounded. 

Polly. — But dont you know that 
you must sign your name and ad- 
dress when asking questions? 
You ought to join one of the cor- 
respondence clubs. See back is- 
sues for addresses of clubs. 

Jim, 14. — Really, you dont ask 
much of anything when you write, 
so I wont say much of anything 
when I answer. 

Lucille B. — Sydney Ainsworth 
in "My Country, 'Tis of Thee." You 
think I would make a good king's 
jester. Alas! and do you think 
that the height of my ambition? 

Arline H. — You refer to True 
Boardman. See chat with him in 
the February Classic. Thomas 
Curran in "The Commuted Sen- 
tence." 

Frances F. — Paula Shay ' and 
James Cooley in "Forbidden 
Charles Cherry and Margaret Skir- 
Passers-by" (Metro). Yes, Charles 
Clary played in "The Carpet from Bagdad" 
(Selig). Creighton Hale in "Snow-White." 
Francis P. Y. — You certainly are a staunch 
admirer of Anita Stewart, and she certainly 
deserves it. Yes, Edna Goodrich is very 
pretty. You think she resembles Beverly 
Bayne? 

F. C. M., Roxbury. — Yes, I do think Farrar 
improved pictures. Dont listen to it. Slan- 
der spreads like an oil-spot; we try to 
cleanse it, but the mark remains. 



Fruit." 
vin in 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



131 



F. A. F. — Thanks for the calendars which 
you so kindly sent me, also for your good 
wishes. I hear Alice Joyce and Tom Moore 
are to be divorced, but I am not sure of it. 

Victor M. — Thanks for the fee. So you 
have been an extra. I know of no other 
way than to keep going to the studio. Thank 
the good Lord that I have not grown too old 
to be young, and never expect to. 

Margaret McG., Rochester. — I mailed list. 

Beatrice de B. — Yes, thank you, I received 
it. I will return the verses if 
you send them, but not other- 
wise! No, child, I have an ex- 
cellent disposition. I never mur- ;v 
mur without cause, but often : ; 
have cause. And, when I do, I 
sometimes use language not ac- >.< 
cording to Hoyle. ' V 

Olga, 17. — I am waiting for the " ■ 

Matrimonial Edition. Let 'er ■■ .;."• 
come. Your letter was all about ifv 
your three C's again. Didn't v|j 
you know that Crane was born 
in Athens, N. Y.? 

Sylvia. — No; Theda Bara is 
not married. I have forgotten 
my geometry. That was just 
oui-dire. 

Gladys L. McHenry. — Address 
Cleo Madison, Los Angeles, Cal., 
and it will get to her. L. Rogers 
Lytton was the spy in "The 
Battle Cry of Peace," and he was 
Philip in "Salvation Joan." 

Ilona H. M. — Anna Nilsson 
and Eugene Strong in "Infidel- 
ity." Holbrook Blinn is with 
McClure in "The Seven Deadly 
Sins." You wish that all the 
wrinkles leave my face. I want 
to hear from you again. 

Evelyn, 17. — Glad to see you 
back. Yes, she is the same Fan- 
nie Ward. Allen Holubar is with 
Universal. As an evidence of 
good faith we always ask the 
name and address of the ques- 
tioner. 

F. X. B. Fax.— But not to 
Beverly Bayne. So you wished 
that Shakespeare could have seen 
"Romeo and Juliet." 

R. A. M., Denver. — Tom For- 
man is with the Western Lasky 
at Los Angeles, Cal. Mabel 
Taliaferro is about four feet six, weighs 
ninety-three pounds, has chestnut hair and 
dark blue eyes. Likes to have her name 
pronounced the way it is spelled — and shud- 
ders with horror every time she is called 
"Tolliver." She is of Italian descent and 
wishes' it to be known thru the proper pro- 
nunciation of her name. See our Photoplay 
Service Bureau in re scripts. 

Old-Fashioned Girl. — Thank you. All 
right, step right in. I shall treat myself 
to a box of fudge with that quarter. 

The Boyquet. — Thanks muchly for the 
scarfpin. You say you are a movie bug be- 



cause you like movies, a nut because you 
love squirrels, a hugger because you're a 
bear. You certainly must be a dangerous 
animal. Your verse was pretty good. 

August R. — Mae Gaston was the girl in 
"Wasted Years." Perhaps you should wear 
glasses. It has been found, that only one 
person in fifteen has perfect eyes. Appar- 
ently, Greece will have no peace until she 
declares war. 

Gladys C. K., Pelham. — You might be able 




. d\.^D&IFK£ 



Director (to actor playing tenderfoot role) — Ride 
him around the corral a couple of times, then let him 
throw you. 

Actor — B-Better let him t-throw me r-right now, 
hadn't I? 



to make an ^Eolian harp. It is made of thin 
boards with strings that vibrate in the wind. 
It was invented in the seventeenth century 
and named after iEolus, god of the winds. 
Kathlyn Williams is still with Morosco. 

Louise H., Sax Diego. — I'll be gentle this 
time. Elmer Clifton was Phil in "The 
Clansman." I dont know who that "pretty 
boy" was. 

Tom Timehoxk. — Earle Foxe is now with 
Pearl White. Yes to your second. Page Peters 
was drowned. It was a year ago the first 
of April that Pavlowa appeared at the Globe 
Theater in "The Dumb Girl of Portici.'' 



132 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Midshipman, Steelton; Isidore K.; Mrs. 
F. A. M.; Theo. T.; Blanche B.; Harry M.; 
Anna B.; Dorothy R.; Loretta M.; Kooko; 
Ruth G.; School Girl; Lottie J.; Winni- 
fred M.; Gertrude C; Florence H.; The- 
resa L.; Mrs. J. B.; Edward C; Edna H.; 
Anna W.; Virginia K.; Emily U.; Mrs. E. 
G.; Lena P. H.; Adolph A.; Hi Larity; 
Lillian M. C. — Sorry I cant give you a de- 
tailed answer, but your questions nave been 
answered before. 



Chicago, but five winters in California have 
made her an* ardent Calif ornian. She was 
educated at Berkeley, Cal. She is about 21. 
Marietta. — The cost of a photoplay com- 
plete may total from $500 to $15,000; the 
star will draw a salary of about $1,000 a 
week, and will be supported by a cast cost- 
ing $2,000 in addition a week; director will 
receive anywhere from $200 to $1,200 a 
week; the camera-man $75 or $150 a week. 
It will take about five weeks to produce a 



99^ Or THESE BUBBLES BURST. 




Florence E.— Read the chat with William 
Russell in March 1913 Magazine. 

George S. — "Silas Marner" was produced 
by both Thanhouser and Edison. Norma 
Phillips was the Mutual girl. Mayme Kelso 
was Aunt. 

CiESAR, 99 — Harry Morey is playing op- 
posite Alice Joyce now. Evelyn Greeley's 
picture appeared on the June 1916 cover. 
Resolution without action is like trying to 
run your auto without gas. Lots of resolu- 
tions are made, but few fulfilled. Get me? 

Adele Rae. — I was glad to know your 
favorites. Blanche Sweet is a native of 



large feature. When the film is complete 
the public will see 5,000 feet — a five-reel 
picture, but the producer no doubt took 
from 10,000 to 40,000 feet of negative, be- 
cause many of the scenes were taken over 
and many omitted. That will give you some 
idea about the cost of a feature. 

T. J. Q. — I dont know whether Henry Wal- 
thall discovered his own talent or whether 
somebody else discovered it for him. Any- 
way, it's there. 

Margarette K. T. — No, my dear, I do not 
go skating — on Broadway or on ice. Yes, 
Peggy Hyland i" "The Chattel." 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



133 



Viola M. — Figure it out for yourself. A 
man 50 years old has spent 6,000 days in 
sleep, worked 6,500 days, walked 800 days, 
enjoyed 4,000 days of amusement, spent 1,500 
days in bed and was sick 500 days, eaten 
17,000 pounds of bread, 16,000 pounds of 
meat, 4,600 pounds of vegetables, eggs and 
fish, and has drunk 7,000 gallons of liquid. 
Bessie Love is with Western Triangle. 
Your letter was a gem. 

Walym. — Speculation is sometimes O. K., 
but it too often begins with its second letter. 
Your letter was long and interesting. You 



never handicapped in his replies, for patience 
is a necessary and important ingredient of 
genius. 

Gerry W. — Asking the age of ten photo- 
plays is too much — much too much. Excel- 
sior is a Latin word, meaning higher, the 
motto of New York State. 

Bella L. — John Bowers played opposite 
Mary Pickford in "Hulda from Holland." 
He also played with Louise Huff in "The 
Reward of Patience." Pierre La Rue is not 
on the cast in "The Crimson Stain." You 
forget that the Board of Review cannot cea- 




On the Moving Picture screen 
The Movie Vampire I have seen; 
Destruction shines from her dark eyes 
And on her lips a false smile lies; 
To wreck a home she now conspires, 
This bewitching Queen of Vampires. 



I saw her off the screen one day, 

This Vampire of the Photoplay; 

In her sweet eyes there lay no guile, 

And innocence was in her smile; 

To break men's hearts she'd no desire, 

For she's not a real but a reel Vampire. 



want an interview with Charles Ray. Presi- 
dent Wilson is having a job getting the bel- 
ligerents together — or apart! It seemed 
impossible that such a war could start, and 
now it seems impossible that it can stop. 

Bertha E. G. — Last picture of Irving 
Cummings appeared in June, 1916. Little 
Bobby Connelly was born in Brooklyn, 
April 4, 1909. He has been playing since 
he was three years old. The ease and com- 
posure of this young actor is a never-dimin- 
ishing topic of conversation among the 
members of the Vitagraph Company. 

Fred H. A.- — I am not a reader of dreams, 
hence cant tell you what your Bushman 
''ream signifies. However, Mr. Bushman is 



sor for any particular audience. The same 
play goes to Maine, California and Texas, 
and it is seen by young and old, rich and 
poor, high-brow and low-brow. 

Pearl White Admirer. — No; the friendlier 
you are, the better. May you have more and 
more friends and need them less and less. 
Yes, pretty nice writing-paper you have. 

Gerrard T. — Yes; Francis Morgan was 
John in "The Daring of Diana." and Frank 
Wupperman was Sir Richard in "The Sus- 
pect." Thanks for yours. 

Olga, 17. — So you think E.- K. Lincoln is 
"too cute for words." Go wan! Of course 
I do. Are we soon to see the finish of the 
war, or the war to a finish? 



134 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Mrs. W. B., Seattle.— Et tu, Brute! I 
hardly ttiink "Nan of Music Mountain" has 
been filmed. I dont think I read it. 

Marjorie E. M. — Mary MacLaren was Es- 
telle, Phillips Smalley was Robert and Jack 
Holt was Jansen in "Saving the Family 
Name." Sleeping-cars were first used in 
1858. Pullman's patent dates from 1864. 




a few conceptions of the "answer man 



Ruth K. — Write direct to our Sales Man- 
ager for back numbers. So you are angry. 
Well, anger is a short-lived madness — a 
mental disorder that usually breaks out at 
the mouth, but more often at the writing- 
desk. I enjoyed your tirade of abuse hugely. 
When you get over your anger come in and 
have luncheon with me. 

Lockhard, N. S. Wales. — Burton Temple 
was the President in "The Fighting Hope." 
Marshall Neilan was Capt. Love in "Mice 
and Men." Richard Bennett in "The Gilded 
Youth." 



Mabel W. — Yours was pretty nearly a 
book. Your limericks weren't quite good 
enough. Try again. 

Plusie; Edna H.; E. Leine; Clyde L.; 
Kay H. T.; Lilla T.; Mildred K. — Your 
questions have been answered before. 

Flodell R. — You can reach George Larkin, 
Kalem Co., Jacksonville, Fla. I'm sure he 
will be glad to 
hear from you. 

Olga, 17. — You 
isay I wield a 
sword of wit which 
I never let grow 
rusty, and this 
shows that you are 
wittier than I am. 
y'est-ce-pas? 

Alicia L. S. — So 
you are from Cuba. 
Better write the 
players in care of 
the companies. 
May Allison was 
born in Georgia 
twenty-two years 
ago. She is a singer 
as well as a player. 
E v e r y w e e k . — 
Should have been 
Ann Luther. You 
are some movie fan, 
all right. Fifty-five 
reels in one week! 
Phew! 

Melva, Portland. 
— Yes, I agree with 
you — I dont care 
about seeing pic- 
tures with players 
who have passed 
away — ■ Arthur 
Hoops and Page 
Peters. So you 
liked Bara's "Juli- 
et" better. 

Billie F. — Y o u 
want to see Warren 
Kerrigan in a big 
play. Wait and you 
will. An artesian 
well is made by 
boring into the 
earth. There is one 
in Missouri 4000 
feet deep. 

Miss E. S., Min- 
neapolis. — Look up March, 1916, and Jan., 
1917, about Creighton Hale. 

Bara-Farnum Nut. — Well, if you go 
around with a chip on your shoulder you 
are pretty sure to find somebody to knock 
it off. Frank Clark was Dextry and Jack 
McDonald was Slapjack in "Spoilers." Let 
me hear from you again also. 

Marion T. — Some people are so energetic 
and ambitious that they climb up the ladder 
of success, while others always remain at 
the bottom because "the elevator aint 
running." Take to the stairs! 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



135 





Don't try to cover up a poor 
complexion - clear it with 



esino 




Resinol Soap not only is exceptionally 
cleansing and refreshing, but its regular use 
reduces the tendency to blotches, relieves 
clogged, irritated pores, and gives Nature 
the chance she needs to make red, rough 
skins white and soft. 

Bathe your face for several minutes with 
Resinol Soap and warm water, working 
the creamy lather into the skin gently with 
the finger-tips. Then wash off with more 
Resinol Soap and warm water. Finish with 
a dash of clear, cold water to close the pores. 

Do this once or twice a day, and you 



^^ 



will be delighted to see how quickly the 
healing Resinol medication soothes and 
cleanses the pores and makes the com- 
plexion clearer, fresher and more velvet}'. 

The soothing, restoring influence that 
makes this possible is the Resinol which 
this soap contains and which physicians 
have prescribed, for over twenty years, in 
the care of skin affections. 

Resinol Soap is sold by ail druggists 
and dealers in toilet goods. For a sample 
cake, free, write to Dept. 13-F, Resinol 
Chem. Co., Baltimore, Md. 



; 



136 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Anna W. — Most of your questions are out 
of order. I believe in justice with a heart 
in it and in a backbone with a little rubber. 

Flodell, Lincoln. — Thanks. You say your 
car is the smallest on the market. See above 
for George Larkin's address. 

Amelia H. — I have no card for Helen 
Keller. Yes, George Periolat and William 
Russell are still with American. Van Dyke 
Brooke is still directing for Vitagraph. 

Gil B. of Vancouver. — Watch your step! 
And be careful. I haven't the age of the 
players you mentioned. The more good ad- 
vice you get, the less use you have for it. 



James was beheaded at Jerusalem; James 
the Less was thrown from a pinnacle of the 
Temple; Philip was hanged; Bartholomew 
was flayed alive; Andrew was bound to a 
cross, whence he preached to his persecutors 
till he died; Thomas was run thru the body; 
Jude was shot to death with arrows; Mat- 
thias was first stoned and then beheaded; 
Barnabas was stoned to death; Paul was 
beheaded at Rome by Nero. It didn't pay 
to be good in those days. 

Jim H. D., Sydney. — Thanks for sending 
me the addressed envelope, but I haven't 
any pictures of myself to send. Very sorry. 



AHA? THERE'S SOMETHIMGJ 
50i^e80Py MIGHT EMJOy), 
THAT'LL MAV/ETO CO ME 

pur!! 




SARCASM 
The "Sense"-or the Censor, or just nonsense, sir? 



Joan F., Australia. — Henry Walthall was 
born and educated in Alabama. Before he 
joined the Motion Pictures, Mr. Walthall 
was on the legitimate stage for seven years. 
He is a man of subtle expression, and in 
the display of emotion has few equals. 

Samson. — What you say is very true, and 
dont forget that even Jesus had a hard time 
of it, and so did His Apostles. Matthew 
suffered martyrdom by the sword; Mark 
was dragged to death thru the streets of 
Alexandria; Luke was hanged on an olive- 
tree in Greece; John was put into a caldron 
of boiling oil; Peter was crucified at Rome; 



Photo Craft Shop. — Thanks for forward- 
ing me the letter to Cleo Madison. It cer- 
tainly was interesting, and I am sorry I 
cant publish it. 

Alicita. — Eddie Polo is with Universal, 
Universal City, Cal. 

Margy, Memphis. — Your letter was spark- 
ling, but I failed to find the questions. 

Maryon M. — So they caught you, did they, 
and sold you some fake film stock? A fool 
and his money are soon spotted. There is 
no place where you can secure a pass to the 
Vitagraph studio. Charles Ray is with Tri- 
angle. Thanks. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



137 




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When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



138 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Olga, 17. — Well, the closer you get to some 
people, the more distant they are. So you 
have a pressing engagement with your 
tailor. Soft music here. Now you are in- 
quiring about Conway Tearle, Creighton Hale 
and Crane Wilbur. Yes, I noticed the three 
C.'s. Answered all your kwestchuns? 

Ethel S. Kempton. — You should see Nazi- 
mova in "War Brides." Danger that is 
known is a guide-post to safety. Essanay 



Taylor, Anita Stewart and a host of others. 
It all came about — my ravishing appetite — 
thru reading Mabel Rowland's "Celebrated 
Actor Folks' Cookerie," a beautifully illus- 
trated and autographed recipe book, com- 
posed and dedicated by famous stage and 
movie stars to the Red Cross and the Actors' 
Fund. Yes, Jack Richardson is married to 
Louise Lester. 
Minnie, 15. — Matty Roubert was Jimmy in 



•■"■■■-^ifef^Ji. 1 ^-*-' 




Now, doesn't it seem like this when a woman in front of you "forgets" to remove her 
hat during an exciting picture? 



produced "The Blindness of Virtue." 
Thanks muchly for sending me that picture. 
I am glad to have it. 

Vera L. — Thank you for the gum. Small 
favors thankfully received. Betty Nansen 
did not play in "The Kiss of Hate." Mar- 
garita Fischer in "The Butterfly Girl." 

Dorothy D., Napier. — I've just had the 
gastronomic pleasure (by mental sugges- 
tion) of having dined with Caruso, Laurette 



"The Big Sister" (Lasky). I'm afraid your 
drawing doesn't resemble Lillian Gish — it 
might be intended for any player. You dont 
show partiality with your drawings. 

Tom King. — No, it was on March 4th, 
1916, that Charlie Chaplin signed his con- 
tract with Mutual calling for a salary of 
$670,000. Herbert Rawlinson with Universal. 

Bertha M. — Irene Boyle, formerly of 
Kalem, is not playing now. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



139 



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UNIVERSAL 

MAIL ORDBRCO. 





If only catalog is 
wanted put an X 
in this square, fill 
in name and ad- 
dress on lines be- 
low and mail 
coupon. 



Universal Mail Order Co. 

145-153 W. 39th St., Dept.185 Chicago 

Gentlemen: Enclosed find 60c for each item marked 

below. If satisfactory after 30 days examination I agree 

to pay the balance as per prices and terms printed in this 

advertisement. If not satisfactory I will return goods to you. 

U131. Automote Swing. U127. 48-piece Dinner Set. 

U135. Rug— Size U126. Kitchen Cabinet. 



Name. 



NOTE— Put line like this 



State 

front of items wanted 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



140 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Margot. — Thank yon for the card. You 
are a big child. You must see "Joan the 
Woman." So you saw "The Rink" twice. 
In spite of the buttermilk I take, my com- 
plexion is rather rusty. 

Rena R. — So you thought Ruth Roland was 
the best-gowned player you have seen (in the 




HEALTHFUL HINTS TO /IQVEM. 




w 



(H ORDER TO 
PRESERVE YOUR 
NATURAL Co/iPLlxlOM 

SEVBB lAPLFUrt 

THE PLOT OT H 
PICTURE OUT LOUD 
OR READ THE £UB^ 
TITLES OUT LOUD 
To YOUR "NEIGHBOR. 

Above hll thiugS 

TlEVER EAPLR1H 

Hovr THE "thrills" 

VTERE PHOTO GRAPHED, 
IF YOU KRE &ITTIWG 1MTHE HISLE 

Seat domt put your teet out m 
THE aisle For people to Fall over 
this is very bhd "For the cows. 
IF ^iou vriSHTOLive to hripe old 

RG-E TiEVER TEL1- H FILM 

ENTHUSIAST THHT YOU HRF IM 

Tavor oThm official Bohrd or 
Censorship, HriDjiEVER Xeeptjme 

YNTH THE MUSIC BY TAPPING OH THE 
BACK OP THE SEHT( OFTHE PERSoH 
IN FROTiT oF YOU) Y}1TH YOUR FOOT. 

rf Hen hll other remedies 

Tail try n "vas-£"o? Morion Pictures 

]?EC0.M7^EMDED BY EVERY HEALTHY 

American r^MiLY. 



Cam be purchased ih AiiYOuflMTiTY— 

IM OliE OR TVfORE R^ELS. 

Sold BY Leading photoplay Houses 

HLL OVER THE VfoRLD* 



audience) when you saw "Intolerance" at 
the Los Angeles Theater. You also want a 
picture of Montague Love. 

Verona M. — Surely, tell us what you like 
and what you dont like about our Magazine. 
That's the only way we can give you what 
you want, and you are the ones to be 
pleased, not us. Send it along. 

Ouida. — Why, Ouida's real name was 
Louise De la Ramee. She was born in Bury 
St. Edmunds, England, of French parentage. 
Herbert Hayes was opposite Theda Bara in 
"The Vixen." 

D. Mc. — Blanche Sweet, Earle Foxe and 
Tom Forman in "Public Opinion." You ask 
for my advice on your poem, but what you 
really want is my approbation — is it not so? 
Well, you have it. 

Queen Dorothy.— Robert Warwick is play- 
ing for Selznick. Your letter was very 
funny. I thought everybody knew that D.M. 
after a name means Doctor of Music. 

Fred D. H. — Thank you so much for the 
pretty card from your city.. Marguerite 
Clark is certainly not dead. This reminds 
me of the old days when it was reported 
every week or so that G. M. Anderson was 
dead, and he still lives. 

Anntonyo L. — Thanks for the foreign 
pieces. James Riley is not playing at pres- 
ent. There are about 100,000 Adventists, and 
they believe there will soon be a second 
coming of Christ. 

Perilous Pearls. — No, Lenore Ulrich and 
June Elvidge are not the same person. Well, 
you know there are several kinds of red 
hair. Acetylene gas is composed of carbon 
and hydrogen, and is used for search-lights. 

Brooklynite. — You ask what the salaries 
of Ruth Roland and Anita and Lucille Stew- 
art are? That's not supposed to be known. 

F. X. B. Admirer. — No, you better not ask 
whether May Allison eats fish on Friday, 
and I'll tell you no fish stories. You ask 
who is the best fighter, Francis X. Bushman 
or William Farnum. You cant prove it by 
me. Why not a prize-fight between them, 
proceeds to go to some worthy charity, such 
as buying me a new Ford car? Yours was 
a James Dandy. Very spicy. 

Mt. V. Girl. — No pictures have been re- 
leased as yet of Helen Gardner in her new 
company. You want to hear more about 
Carey Lee and Adelaide Woods. Complaint 
of ill luck is often an apology for laziness. 

Eleanor O'N. — Thanks; I dont know why 
I said that. They're not only wearing them 
higher in Hawaii, but in Brooklyn. 

Bill N. — You refer to Jean Sothern in 
"The Two Orphans"^ as the blind girl. She 
played in a serial and is now with Art 
Drama Co. You want G. U. Stiff to take 
some of the starch out of his name. I do 
wish he would, and if he wont, perhaps you 
can do it — eh, what? 

A. S. D., Los Angeles.— The British royal 
family is supported by the British people. 
There are about a dozen of them, and they 
are expensive luxuries, since it costs about 
$3,000,000 a year to support them. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



141 




Tells You the New Way He 
Presses His Trousers 



Get Your Valet for Less Than 
a Penny a Month! 



Don't send your Trousers to the tailor again. His press- 
ing iron scorches the life out of the cloth, while the hot 
steam rots the fabric. Do as Crane Wilbur does, use 

Leahey 's HEMLESS Trouser Press 

(Protected by U. S. Letters Patent 1,112,922) 

It's a Presser, Creaser, Stretcher, and Hanger all com- 
bined in one. First cost is the last cost — no operating 
expense. You simply moisten the edges of your trousers, 
lay them smoothly in the press, snap on the steel clamps, 
hang them over chair or in closet — then forget it ! In the 
morning }^our trousers are ready, perfect as a fashion 
plate, with a knife-like crease from belt to boot. 

Saves the price in tailors' bills the first month. Made 
from the toughest, selected waterproofed fibre board, with 
highly tempered steel clamps, heavily nickel-plated. Costs 
only $1— lasts a lifetime. 

Keep all your trousers in the closet in Leahey's Presses 
instead of hangers. Holds the .trousers in shape and keeps 
out dust and moths. Satisfaction guaranteed or money 
refunded. 




PASSED BY THE 

NATIONAL BOARD OF 

PARTICULAR MEN 



HERE'S YOUR COUPON— SEND IT NOW- 



MONEY BACK COUPON GUARANTEE 

AUTO VACUUM FREEZER CO. 

(Trouser Press Dept.), 50 W. Broadway, N.Y. City 

Enclosed find $1. for which please send me postpaid 
one Leahey's HEATLESS Trouser Press. If at 
the end of 10 days I do not wish to keep it. I 
will return it to you and you will return my dollar. 



Name. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



142 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Texas Joe. — Of course I'm 75 now, and J 
thank all of you who sent me birthday cards. 
But I would not advise you to take up 
screen work. 

Lenora K., Newark. — Yes, and Mabel is 
with Metro. Her dressing-room is decorated 
in white and rose. John Davidson was 
Navarette in "The Brand of Cowardice." 
Lillian Lorraine is with Equitable. So you 
want a picture of Arline Pretty. She is still 
with Vitagraph. 



versal, Ipving the rich as well as the poor, 
and the ignorant as well as the educated. 
Lottie Pickford has one child. 

Betty Bell. — Yes, I am pleased that you 
have chosen William S. Hart to take the 
place of Arthur Johnson. You will find a 
nice lay-out of him in Jan. 1917 Classic. 

Unsigned. — Thanks for the thyroid glands 
information. You say they develop when 
thirteen or fourteen. That they take care 
of poisons in the body, and if for some 




ILLUSTRATED FROM A CAMERA-MAN'S DIARY 

The Somme Front, nearing Sailly Saillesel. Nov. 18, 1916. 
"What an Irish recruit in the English army said when passing for the battle-line: 
Voice from the Ranks — I say, me boy, if ye ever go to old Dublin-town, with me 
face in yer movie, be sure to tell me dear mother, who would give a whole blooming 
world to see what I look like once more! 



Catherine H. — I dont know how you are 
going to tell whether you have a camera face 
or not. The only way would be to try it out. 

Wee Gee. — Dont call me the Answer Lady, 
if you dont want to get hurted. I wont 
stand for being called a lady — understand? 
I am 75, and not a day older. I live in a 
hallroom, live on buttermilk and delicates- 
sen food, and am no woman. 

Elizabeth P. — Thanks. You want a pic- 
ture of Frank Mills. 

Clara M. — That's the idea — let's be uni- 



reason they are diseased, they fail to do 
this and cause cardiac involvement. Dear 
me! I wonder if I have it. I hope not, for it 
sounds pretty bad. 

Mae. — But you must sign your name in 
the future, please. What size shoe Margue- 
rite Clark wears? Marguerite Clark is four 
feet tall, weighs ninety-four pounds, has 
brown hair and eyes. She is twenty-eight 
or thirty-two (take your choice), and some- 
times looks ten. She never looks more than 
sixteen, on the screen or off. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



143 



###$£ 



Knox ««««» Gelatine 
Quality and Quantity 



"WHAT to have for DESSERT and SALAD" is answered in a 
variety of ways by our beautifully illustrated recipe book, "Dainty 
Desserts for Dainty People." 

In this book (sent you free) I have included some delightful 
surprises in recipes for easy-to-make Salads, Desserts and Candies 
that are most economical. Below is a recipe for a delicious and 
economical dessert. 

Each package of Knox Sparkling Gelatine will make enough 
jelly to serve twenty people, or it is so easily measured that one 
can make an individual dish. 



M^ JIX^.K 



President 



KNOX ORANGE JELLY 

P suga 

2 tablespoonfuls lemon juice. 



1 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine. I cu 
Yi cup cold water. 2 cups boiling water. 



sugar.. 1 cup orange juice, 
tablespoonfuls lemon juice. 
Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes, and dissolve in boiling water. Addsugarand stir 



KNOX 

, PLAIN 

rJ*rf 

( J El ATI HE 

CH^Rtts'B.V^OX CO. 



until dissolved; then add orange and lem- 
on juice. Strain through cheese cloth into 
molds, first dipped in cold water, and chill. 

NOTE— If desired, add fresh or canned fruit 
or chopped nuts when making. Serve with or 
Without whipped cream. 

Recipe Book FREE 

for your grocer's name. K you have 
never used Knox Gelatine, enclose 4c 
in stamps for pint sample. 

CHAS. B. KNOX GELATINE CO., Inc. 

473 Knox Ave., Johnstown, N. Y. 



KNOX 



Beverly Bayne Admirer. — -Artcraft is the 
name of the company who produce the Mary 
Pickford plays. Mignon Anderson and Harris 
Gordon in "The Mill on the Floss." 

Gertrude E. — Mary Miles Minter is with 
American. Louise Huff in "The Old Home- 
stead." Charles Ray was Rex in "The 
Wolf-Woman." That's trick photography. 
Thanks. 

Betty of Melrose,— Yes, Jack Dean in 
"Witchcraft." Paul Lawrence was Sydney 
in "The Upheaval." Of course I approve the 
President's action. He simply asked if it 
was a private war, or if anybody could get in. 

T. B. — You say that Germany made war 
on her own terms and now wants to make 
peace in the same way, and that the Kaiser 
bestowed 10,000 iron crosses and 5,000,000 
wooden crosses. Shame on you, T. B.! 

Anna D. — Comfortably plump is right. 
Harry Northrup was in to see us today. He 
is with Metro at present. Marguerite Snow 
was the girl in "Zudora." President Wilson 
may yet succeed in getting peace. Noah's 
dove didn't accomplish much on its first trip! 



Inquisitive Dotty. — You ask the name of 
the tallest player. Will have them all meas- 
ured and let you know later. Beauty is 
worse than wine — it intoxicates the holder 
and the beholder. 

Billie, 19. — Thank you a thousand times. 
You are so good to me. Montague Love. 
Perhaps you haven't Olga's correct address. 
Paul Cappelani was the doctor, and Edward 
Langford was Derwent in. "The Dark Si- 
lence." Yes; Edward Earle is quite popular 
with the ladies. 

Nellie L. — I never laugh at anybody's 
writing. Ethelmary Oakland was the girl 
in "The Woman and the World." Violet 
Davis was with Vitagraph. 

Susan B. — Fayette Perry was the girl as 
the maid in "Silks and Satins." That's true, 
the good die young. That's why I live to a 
ripe old age. D.ouglas Fairbanks and Bessie 
Love in "Good Bad Man." 

Neva S. — You still have that chat with 
Lois Weber coming. 

Frances F. — Yes; Russell Bassett played 
in "Less Than Dust." 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



144 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



E. R., Hamtramck. — Nicholas Dunaew is 
with Universal. His picture was in the 
February 1915 Magazine. I think "The 
House of Rimmon" has not been screened. 

Marie A. G. — One of the most remarkable 
and far-reaching principles is retaliation. 
When a fly or mosquito disturbs our repose, 
the first impulse is to kill it. If a man 
treads on our toes in a crowded car, we are 
inclined to resent it with either an angry 
retort, insult or blow. When a person 



D.; L. C. P.; Annie M.; Ethel T.; John P.; 
Annie T.; Emma B.; Bernice L.; Lenore K.; 
Mrs. R. A. H.; Aurea M., and Thelma M. — 
Your questions have all been answered be- 
fore. Sorry I cant answer you individually. 

Happy. — Thanks for them kind woids. 
Half our public effort seems to be to unbotch 
the botched. Dorothy Bernard is with the 
Art Drama. 

Bingo, 18. — Glad to hear from you again. 
No, not all the women want to vote, or 



IFXVMRITE TO 

70V viill yau 

LHMSYNER /y»E" 




SUCH IS THE LIFE OF A POPULAR MOVIE STAR 



smites us on one cheek we do not "turn 
unto him also the other," but the inclination 
is to smite him back. If we are wounded 
by a sharp criticism that hits our pride, we 
feel like getting square with somebody, and 
if we cant get at the critic we take it out 
on anybody who happens to be around — the 
servant, the office-boy, the wife, or on any- 
body (however dear to us they may be) on 
the slightest provocation. This spirit of 
retaliation, or of revenge, also operates 
when anything we love is attacked, such as 
our dog, our child, our flag or our country. 
Margaret W.; June W.; J. M. K.; Demple 
McC; Curls; Alice L.; Florence H.; Elsa 



march in parades, or speak in conventions; 
but practically all of them want more 
liberty in dry goods stores. We published 
the story "April" in June 1916 Classic. Iva 
Shepard and Edgar Davenport in "The 
Salamander." Thanks for the programs. 

Chester A. M. — Seena Owen's baby is a 
girl — born in October, 1916, and is named 
Georgia Seena. In private life she is Mrs. 
George Walsh. Gertrude Bondhill was 
Nancy, and Wharton Jones was Richard in 
"The Unborn." I know of no studio in 
Oklahoma, except the Miller Bros.' ranch. 

Florence H. — See above. Gerda Holmes 
and Robert Warwick in "Friday the 13th." 



MOTIOX PICTURE MAGAZIXE 



145 



OurHJewel 

SMASHES 




Look! 

21 Ruby and Sap- 
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— direct to you — positively the exact prices 

the wholesale dealer would have to pay. Think of 

the high-grade, guaranteed watch we offer here at 

such a remarkable price. And, if you wish, you may pay 

this price at the rate of $2.50 a month. Indeed, the 

days of exhorbitant watch prices hare passed. 

You don't pay 
a cent to any- 
body until you 
see the watch. You don't buy a Burlington 
Watch without seeing it. Look at the splendid 
beauty of the watch itself. Thin model, handsomely 
shaped — aristocratic in every line. Then look at the 
works! There you will see the masterpiece of the watch 
makers' skill. A perfect timepiece adjusted to positions, 
temperature and isochronism. 



See It First 



Every fighting vessel in the U. S. Navy has the BurHngton Watch aboard. Many 
have over 100 Burlingtons ~ a few over 200. This includes every torpedo boat— 
every submarine as well as the big Dreadnaughts. 

Send Your Name on 
This Free Coupon 



/ 



Get the Burlington Watch Book by sending this 
coupon now. You will know a lot more about watch buying 
when you read it. You will be able to "steer clear" of 
the over-priced watches which are no better. Send 
' the coupon today for the watch book and our offer. 



Burlington Watch Co, 

£ 19th Street and Marshall Bftd. 
/ Dept. 1543 Chicago, III. 

£ Please send me (without obligation and 

* prepaid) yonr free book on watchej 

& with full explanation of your cash ot 

JF $2.50 amonthotfer on the Burlington Watch. 

/ 



1^ Name. 



Burlington Watch Co. 

19th St. & Marshall Blvd., Dept. 1 543 Chicago, III. 



& Address 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICT I RE MAGAZ1N E. 



146 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



Alexina B. — You say that "a typewriter 
is one who typewrites on the typewriter, 
and the typewriter is a machine on which 
the typewriter who typewrites on the type- 
writer typewrites; now, the typewriter who 
typewrites on the typewriter typewrites on 
the typewriter until there is no more type- 
writing to be typewritten by the typewriter 
on the typewriter on which the typewriter 
typewrites." 

Buddy. — Hart Hoxie was Boyle in "The 
Witch of the Dark House." I doubt whether 



ing 80 portraits with a year's subscription, 
and the portraits are splendid. Homme 
d'esprit, I dont know about that. Chat with 
Gladys Hulette. Editor please take notice. 
Lucille H. P. — So you dont think our 
Greenroom Jottings are long enough. Every 
day the question is asked "What should we 
do?" I dont know, but I know what we will 
do: Go on as we are. The wise ones will 
remedy their little follies; the foolish ones 
will continue to clamor for some big change, 
and get nothing. 



-idC^ 




Farmer — That's the first sight of that kind I've ever witnessed in my life. 
Camera-Man — That's nothing! Yesterday he rode off the highest building in the city. 
Oh, I tell you these movies are marvelous! 



those films are in circulation unless they are 
features. Yes, I liked "Wasted Years" fairly 
well. You like our pictures unadorned bet- 
ter in the Gallery. Beauty unadorned is 
adorned the most. Your letter, too, was very 
interesting. I always like to hear from you. 

F. W., Bristol. — Guess we are in the same 
boat. You want to know "Who is married 
to whom, what is divorced from which, and 
how much it gets per week." Well, that's 
more than I can tell, but we have a surprise 
in store for you in our next issue. Yes, I 
do like Charles Ray, but I dont think I 
would give him all that you would. Your 
letter is mighty clever, and I wish I could 
print it all. Keep up the good work. 

J. K. L. — Get in touch with our Sales 
Manager about subscriptions. We are offer- 



Little Maid. — Violet Wilkie was the sister 
in "The Children Pay." Helen Badgley is 
with Metro. Always glad to hear from you. 
It was on February 3, 1915, that Clara 
Kimball Young formed her own company. 

Nig. — Zoe Bech is with Universal playing 
under the name of Zoe Du Rae. The first vam- 
pire of Biblical history is Mary Magdalen. The 
first vampire of screen history is Alice Hol- 
lister. And Alice Hollister played her first 
vampire role when she played Mary Magda- 
len in "From the Manger to the Cross." 

Clio. — The Original Clio! "Lonesome's" 
address is Henry A. Flein, 93 Pearl St., 
Chelsea, Mass. No; Olga Petrova is not 
going* to abandon the screen. Vernon Steele 
with Famous Players last. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



147 



Typewriter Sensation 




Free Trial 

Use As You Pay 

Only $2.50 a 
month until the 
low total price of 
$48.80ispaid, 
and the ma- 
chine is yours. 



This is absolutely the most generous typewriter 
offer ever made. Do not rent a machine when 

you can pay $2.50 a month and own. one. Think of it — Buy- 
ing a $100.00 machine for $48.80. Clash price, $45.45. Never 
before has anything like this been attempted. 

Standard ¥ f* C— -»J*U 

visible L. C Dimtn 

Perfect machines, Standard size, Keyboard of 
Standard Universal arrangement writing 84 

characters— universally used in teaching the touch system. 
The entire line of writing completely visible at all times, 
has the tabulator, the two-color ribbon, with automatio 
reverse, the back spacer, ball bearing type bars, ball bear- 
ing carriage action, ball bearing shift action, in fact every 
late style feature and modern operating convenience. Comes 
to you with everything complete; tools, cover, operating book 
and instructions, ribbon, practice paper — nothing extra to 
buy. You cannot imagine the perfection of this beautiful 
reconstructed typewriter until you have seen it. I have sold 
several thousand of these perfect latest style Model No. 2 
machines at this bargain price and every one of these thou- 
sands of satisfied customers had this beautiful, strictly up 
to date machine on five days' free trial before deciding to 
buy it. I will send it to you F. O. B. Chicago for five days' 
free trial. It will sell itself, but if you are not satisfied 
that this is the greatest typewriter you ever saw, you can 
return it at my expense. You won't want to return it after 
you try it — you cannot equal this wonderful value anywhere. 

You Take No Risk— Put In Your 

Order NOU) When the typewriter arrives deposit 
with the express agent $8.80 and take 
the machine for five days' trial. If you are convinced that 
it is the best typewriter you ever saw, keep it and send me 
$2.50 a month until our bargain price of $48.80 is paid. 
If you don't want it, return it to the express agent, receive 
your $8.80 and return the machine to me. I will pay the 
return express charges. This machine is guaranteed just as 
if you paid $100.00 for it. It is standard. Over one hun- 
dred thousand people own and use these typewriters and 
think them the best ever manufactured. 

The supply at this price is very limited, the price will prob- 
ably be raised when my next advertisement appears, so don't 
delay. Fill in the coupon today — mail to me — the typewriter 
will be shipped promptly. There is no red tape. I employ 
no solicitors — no collectors — no chattel mortgage. It is sim- 
ply understood that I retain title to the machine until the 
full $48.80 is paid. You cannot lose. It is the greatest 
typewriter opportunity you will ever have. Do not send me 
one cent. Get the coupon in the mails today — sure. 

HARRY A. SMITH, 307, 231 N. Fifth Ave., CHICAGO 



; H. A. SMITH, 307, 231 N. Fifth Ave., Chicago. III. 

5 Ship me a No. 2 L. C. Smith F. O. B. Chicago, as described 

9 in this advertisement. I will pay you the $40.00 balance of 

■ the SPECIAL $48.80 purchase price, at the rate of $2.50 

■ per month. The title to rema.n in you until fully paid for. 
a It is understood that I have five clays in which to examine 
| and try the typewriter. If I choose not to keep it I will 

■ carefully repack it and return it to the express agent. It is 
I understood that you give the standard guarantee for one year. 



NAME 

ADDRESS. 




80 to 100 Words a Minute 
Guaranteed I 

Learn at Home— 10 Easy Lessons 

A wonderful new method of acquiring skill on the typewriter had 
been discovered. Almost over night it has revolutionized the 
whole typewriting situation. 

Already thousands of stenographers and other typewriter users 
who never exceeded thirtv to forty words a minute, are writing 
80 to 100 words with half the effort and with infinitely greater 
accuracy than they ever could before, and they're earning salaries 
increased in proportion. 

Nothing Else Like It 

Don't confuse this new way in typewriting with any system of 
the past. There has never been anything like it before. It is 
as different from the old touch systems as day is from night. 
Special Gymnastic Finger-Training Exercises bring results in 
days that ordinary methods will not produce in months. It is 
the greatest step in typewriting since the typewriter itself was 
invented— already its success has become nation-wide. 

Doubles and Trebles Salaries 

Among the thousands of operators who have taken up this system 
are hundreds of graduates of business colleges and special type- 
writing courses — many were so-called touch writers — yet there ha* 
not been a single one who hasn't doubled or trebled his or her 
speed and accuracy, and the salaries have been increased from 
$8 to $15 a week (their former salaries) to $25, $30 and even 
$40 weekly. And the new way is amazingly easy for anyone — 
there are only ten lessons and they can be quickly learned 
at home. 

Valuable Book Free 

We cannot describe here the secret principle of this new method. 
But we have prepared a book which tells all about it, in complete 
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how this unique new method will quickly make your fingers strong 
and dextrous, bring them under perfect control, make them ex- 
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can transform your typewriting and make it easy, accurate and 
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instruction book ever written, no matter what its cost, ever told so 
plainly the real WHY and HOW of expert typewriting. 
If you are ambitious to get ahead — if you want to make your work 
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book at once. It will be a revelation to you a^ to the speed and sa'ary 
that is possible to typists. Mail the coupon or a postal to-day — Now. 



USE THIS FOR BIGGER PAY- 



The Tulloss School of Typewriting, S123 College Hill, Springfield, Ohio 

Please send me your Free Book about the New Way in Type- 
writing. This incurs no obligation whatever on my parw I 
enclose 4c in stamps to cover mailing, wrapping, etc 

Name 

Street 

City State 

Occupation 



When answering: advertisements kindly mention 3IOTIOX 1'ICTl KK MAGAZINE. 



148 



ANSWER DEPARTMENT 



M. L. D., Montreal. — There may be a 
world rounder than this, a country better 
than this, a nation abler than this, a maga- 
zine finer than this — but where are they? 
You might write her; I think she will 
answer. 

Blossom F. — You have me wrong. I am 
not 35, but 75. Mae Murray, out in Califor- 
nia, has a pet ostrich, given her by a fan. 
Mae is bringing it up by hand and is very 
proud of it. Grace Cunard is playing in "The 
Purple Mask." 

C. G. M. T. — Jule Power was the girl in 
"Gloria's Romance" you refer to. Alice 
Joyce's baby is a lit- 
tle more than a year 
old (was born Novem- 
ber 23, 1915), and is 
named for its mother, 
Alice Mary Moore. 

L. C. W. — Former- 
ly Photoplay Clear- 
ing House, but now 
Photoplay Service 
Bureau. I would ad- 
vise you to get a copy 
of "Here Lies," 25c, 
for all beginners in 
photoplay writing. I 
appreciate your com- 
ments muchly, but I 
am not only 55. 

Earl. — Dont be 
afraid; write as of- 
ten as you like. A. 
Lumsden Hare was 
Stevens in "Friday 
the Thirteenth." 
George Beranger was 
Brace in "The Half- 
Breed." H. B. Warner 
played in "Beggar of 
Cawnpore" and "The 
Vagabond Prince." 
William Desmond 
was Dick, and Charles 
Miller was Robert in 
"The Payment." Yes; 
Billie Burke's baby's 
name is Florence Pa- 
tricia Burke Zieg- 
feld, and Billie says 
that the baby is to 
be educated in Eng- 
land. 

M. M., St. Louis. — No, the shorter are 
more popular. Really, it is most amusing to 
read the different opinions you readers have 
of me. Why, Wallace Reid is six feet- two 
inches tall, weighs one hundred and ninety- 
seven pounds, has brown hair and brown 
eyes. He is married to Dorothy Davenport. 
"Edna D. — Your toast, "To our wives and 
our sweethearts, may they never meet," is 
clever, but it does not apply to me, because 
I have neither. Vera Sisson with Metro. 

Dan, 88. — I am glad you liked the picture 
of Douglas Fairbanks. Clara K. Young was 
interviewed in May, 1913. 



TRIALS OF A ONE-SHOW-TOWN 
OPERATOR 
If she jumps outa frame, they stamp their 
feet; if it flickers (junk), the manager 
blows his horn; if she jumps off, they 
whistle and yell; and if the carbon burns 
down — h-*-ll! 



Theda Bara Lover, — The Koran is the 
sacred book of the Mohammedans. Its doc- 
trine is the unity of God and the existence 
of religion, with changeable ceremonies. 
Punishment for the bad and rewards for the 
good are presented and exemplified by stories 
taken from the Bible and other works. I 
know of no way you can reach the players 
personally. You will have to get in touch 
with them at the studio. 

H. G. W. — Dustin Farnum's happy smile 
is known from ocean to ocean. He is a 
quarter-inch taller than his six-foot brother 
William, weighs 180 pounds and has dark 
hair and eyes. Mr. 
Farnum was born in 
New England, and is 
admired not only be- 
cause he is hand- 
some, but because of 
his charming per- 
sonality and his 
pleasing, care-free 
manner. 

R. G. T., Pitts- 
burgh. — Dorothy E. 
Gish was born in 
Dayton, 0., March 
11, 1898, and Lillian 
Gish was born in 
Springfield, O., Octo- 
ber 14, 1896. 

Cunard Admirer. — 
Of course I was glad 
to know all your fa- 
vorites. Why not sell 
your- hammer and 
buy a horn? Mary 
Fuller will soon be 
playing. So you like 
"Gloria's Romance." 
Pabst. — I hope I 
shall often be fortu- 
nate enough to serve 
a friend, and noble 
enough to conceal it. 
So you want an nr- 
terview with Mahlon 
Hamilton. Let me 
hear from you again. 
Lester C. Y. — So 
you saw Arthur Ash- 
ley in person. Harry 
Myers is with Vim. 
Maurice Costello with 
Consolidated last. 
E. O. S. Van Nuys— Violet MacMillan is 
with Universal. Yes, "A Daughter of the 
Gods" and "Joan the Woman" are being- 
shown in New York, but "Intolerance" is 
not. J. W. Johnston played in "Out of the 
Drifts." Dorothy Kelly did not play in "The 
Devil's Prize." 

Dulcie C. — Really cant take on any more 
correspondents for personal letters. Sorry. 
I should like to write you a long letter, but 
there are hundreds of others waiting. Alice 
Taafe was the girl in "Not My Sister." No; 
I'm not married, and dont intend to be. 
Yes, I'm really 75. 




MOTIOX PICTURE MAGAZINE 



149 




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On the Beach Front. Open All Year. 

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President. 




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Djer Trix. — You ask if Harry Hilliard is 
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Captain Molly.— Gladys Hulette is with 
Thanhouser. Thanks for sending me the 
programs. There is one advantage in being 
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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



151 



$50 for a Good Story 

II $25 for Another Not Quite So Good II 

$10 for the Next Best 

(I And $5 Each for the Next Ten II 

II Have you a story to tell? Have you a story || 

I about yourself, or perhaps your family, or ances- §§ 

II tors, or friends, or acquaintances? Surely you §§ 

I have, for there are few men or women in this || 

II world who have not some dramatic story to tell. || 

II Think of some episode in your own life, in the || 

I life of another, or, if you possess the gift of f| 

II imagination, write a story that is purely imagina- || 

II tive, but at the same time is TRUE TO LIFE, || 

II and send it in to us, to compete for one of the || 

I prizes set forth above. There is no entrance fee || 

II and anybody may compete. No manuscript will || 

II be returned unless it is accompanied with a || 

II stamped, addressed envelope. The scripts that win || 

|| prizes will become our property. || 

We Demand Only One Condition: || 

I Limit Your Story to Five Hundred Words (j 

|| Millions attend the Motion Picture theaters || 

|| nightly. To satisfy the ever-increasing demands || 

l| of these millions of movie fans, the great pro- || 

|i ducing companies must have stories. Several of.|| 

| these film corporations, who are exceedingly || 

|| anxious to please the movie patrons, have acknowl- II 

If edged to us that they need stronger plots. We || 

|| want to encourage the art of plot writing. 

Absolutely No Technical Skill Needed (( 

|| All the big studios now employ wViters who || 

| work out the stories into scenes, and put them in || 

|| proper shape for the screen. But there is a great || 

I dearth of stories. The companies must have new || 

[ plots, new ideas, new incidents, and they are || 

( obliged to depend in a great measure upon the || 

! public. Moreover, the studios are now willing to || 

I pay big prices for plots alone. The price is con- || 

I stantly rising, and, at the present time, 1 1 

From $50 to $1,000 is Being Paid II 
For Plots Alone 

Your story may be incomplete — lack dramatic || 

I interest, suspense, climax, surprise, novelty, char- || 

| acterization or any of the other elements that go || 

| to make up a salable dramatic story. If you think || 

I so you may submit it to us for criticism. For a =| 

I fee of $1.00 we shall be happy to point out to 1 1 

| you the defects in your work, indicating why II 

i certain things should not be done, and suggesting || 

I others that will materially improve your script. II 

i In other words, we shall be glad to collaborate II 

[ with you in turning out a strong and appealing II 

j tale. This work will be done only by well-known || 

j scenario writers, who have had studio experience, || 

| including the editors of the Motion Picture H 

| Magazine and Classic. II 

In addition to an honest, upbuilding criticism, |l 

| we will mail you a list of producing companies, to || 

i whom you can submit your story in case you do || 

j not wish to enter it in this contest. You mav || 

[ enter your story whether or not it has been || 

j criticized, but under no conditions will we answer || 

i questions regarding the merits of stories. Thus ii 

| we shall be treating all writers alike. CRITICISM ii 

I OF YOUR STORY IS ENTIRELY OPTIONAL II 

| WITH YOURSELF. |J 

| THE CONTEST CLOSES ON MARCH 31, 1917. \\ 

THE SCENARIO SERVICE BUREAU II 

1 175 Duffield Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. City [I 

annimiinimiiiiiuiiiiniiiin 



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FOR SALE 

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THE TEN-PINNET CO., 90 Draper St.. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



152 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 





Don't cut the cuticle. Cutting leaves a rough edge — makes 
hangnails. See how lovely Cutex makes them/ 

Why cutting ruins the cuticle 

How you can keep it smooth 
and firm without cutting 

ALL specialists say that in caring for the nails, one's 
whole effort should be to keep the cuticle unbroken. 
When the cuticle is trimmed or cut away, the skin 
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Cutex completely does away with 
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ana lry "" says: "I have Cutex to thank 

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nail, gently pushing back the cuticle. Almost at once you can 
wipe off the. dead surplus skin. Rinse the hands in clear water. 

Then a touch of Cutex Nail White removes all discolora- 
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Cutex Nail Cake gives your nails a delightful polish. 
The first Cutex manicure makes a decided improvement 

Until you use Cutex, you cannot realize what a great im- 
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attractive your nails can be made to look. Try it and see! 

Cutex manicure preparations are sold in all high-class drug 
and department stores. Cutex Cuticle Remover comes in 50c 
and $1.00 bottles with an introductory size at 25c. Cutex Nail 
White is 25c. Cutex Nail Polish, in cake, powder or paste 
form, is 25c. Cutex Cuticle Comfort is also 25c. If your favorite 
store has not yet been supplied with Cutex, order direct from us, 
giving your dealer's name, andwewill fill your order promptly. 

Send 14c today for this complete manicure set 

Send 14c now— 10c for the manicure set and 4c for postage 
and packing— and we will send you this Midget Manicure Set, 
containing all four Cutex products, complete with cotton, 
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Send today. Address 

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401 Cutex Building 
9 W. Broadway N.Y. Ci 

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Our Cover Girl — Violet Mersereau 

((Continued from page 123) 

dazed, I paused, blinked, and then looked 
up — to discover that what I had mis- 
taken for light was merely the smile of a 
slim little girl in a blue pinafore, who 
stood in the doorway of a room before 
me and smiled and smiled. 

"Do come in," she said, gaily, when 
I had recovered my presence of mind and 
introduced myself. 

I followed her into the room, was in- 
troduced to sister Claire, and to Mrs. 
Mersereau, a dear, motherly lady to 
whom I instantly lost my heart. When 
we were all seated comfortably, I no- 
ticed that Violet, adorably serious and 
as much engrossed in her task as if the 
fate of nations depended upon it, was 
lighting the little lamp of a tea-service 
on a table beside her. 

With her straight brows puckered in 
an earnest attempt at a frown, she 
measured, watched and waited. And 
the result was quite worthy of her 
deep attention. For Violet Mersereau, 
I discovered, is almost as good a cook 
as she is an actress. 

Over the tea-cups — fascinating place 
for gossip — I discovered several things 
about her : that she is nineteen years- 
old, having been born on the 2d of 
October, 1897; that the place was New 
York, and that she is French and 
English — a wonderful entente just now. 
She has hair like ripe wheat in 
the sun, and her eyes are warmly, 
deeply blue. And her smile — it re- 
minds one of the roses and sunlight, 
and springtime and love's young dream. 
In it are blended the joys of all the 
world and the sorrow of one small 
girl. There's just a hint of wistfulness 
about her smile that is very fetching. 

She made her formal stage debut as 
a star in "Rebecca of Sunnybrook 
Farm." Kate Douglas Wiggins, the 
author, was in the manager's office 
when Violet Mersereau applied for a 
part. The author and the manager 
were discussing the cast for "Rebecca 
of Sunnybrook Farm," and there was 
some difficulty about the girl for the 
title part. But when Violet came in, 
with her shy, but charming smile, Mrs. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



153 



Wiggins smiled back, involuntarily, 
and said quickly : 

"Here's our Rebecca ! We need look 
no farther." 

The manager disagreed ; then Violet 
smiled at him, pleadingly — and he was 
lost. Almost any man would be ! 

So the little girl was allowed to try 
out the part, and I'd like to tell you 
that she was immediately engaged, at 
a tremendous salary, to be starred on 
Broadway — to have her name outside 
in electric lights and all like that. But 
that wouldn't be true, and an interview, 
above all things, must tell the truth! So 
I shall have to admit that her extreme 
youth interfered with her playing the 
seventeen-year-old Rebecca in the last 
act. But she w r as signed to understudy 
the star, and a year later, when she 
was sixteen, she Avas given the star- 
part and electric lights on Broadway. 

The smile did it, of course ! 

Life hasn't been all sunshine and 
roses for this brave little girl with her 
sunny, golden smile. When she was a 
kiddy of nine her father died, and she 
and her seven-year-old sister, Claire, 
went on the stage as bread-winners. 
Claire went with Maxine Elliott, while 
Violet went with Margaret Anglin. 
Claire's destinies took her to London, 
and her mother went with her to look 
after her. The mother of another little 
girl in Miss Anglin's company "looked 
after Violet." 

Of course she is a star now and 
may demand her "rig\ts," as some stars 
have a way of doing. But it isn't due 
to the God of Good Luck, or Chance- 
it's due to hard work and that indomi- 
tably brave little smile. 

So when we look at Violet Mer- 
sereau, the Star, let us remember Violet 
Mersereau, the Girl, and appreciate her 
at her true value. 

REALISTIC 
It was a Western scene. The movie half- 
breed was in the act of stealing a horse. 
"He cant get away with it," said an old- 
timer in the audience, as he drew a forty- 
five and emptied it at the thief, who, never- 
theless, rode swiftly on down a film ravine. 
"Well, I'll be jiggered!" muttered the would- 
be executive of unwritten law; "that's the 
first time I ever missed five in a row, an' I 
could've swore I had a bead on 'im!" 




heading off 
fresh cold, reliev- 
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stopping a "hack- 
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found Dean's Menthol- 
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During my studio 
work, when a cough means ruin to a 
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154 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




You Get The Job" 

"We've been watching you, young man. We know 
you're made of the stuff that wins. The man that 
cares enough about his future to study an I. C. S. 
course in his spare time is the kind we want in this 
firm's responsible positions. You're getting your 
promotion on what you knonju, and I wish we had 
more like you. ' ' , 

The boss can't take chances. When he has a re- 
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He's watch ing you right now, hoping you'll be ready 
when the opportunity comes. 

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yourself to do some one thing better than others. 
You can do it in spare time through the International 
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f— — — — — — — - TEAR 0uT HEBE "" — — — — — — " 

I INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS 

[ Box 6564 SCRANTON, PA. 

I Explain, without obligating me, how I can qualify for the position, 
1 or in the subject, before which I mark X. 



or in the subject, before which ! 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 

Electric Lighting 

Electric Car Running 

Electric Wiring 
3 Telegraph Expert 

Practical Telephony 

MECHANICAL ENGINEER 

Mechanical Draftsman 

Machine Shop Practice 

HGas Engineer 
3 CIVIL ENGINEER 
3 Surveying and Mapping 
'"'MINE FOREMAN OR ENGINEER 

Metallurgist or Prospector 

STATIONARY ENGINEER 

Marine Engineer 
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3 Contractor and Builder 
3 Architectural Draftsman 
3 Concrete Builder 
3 Structural Engineer 
3 PLUMHING AND HEATING 
3 Sheet Metal Worker 
3 CHEMICAL ENGINEER 



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B SALESMANSHIP 
ADVERTISING MAN 
B Window Trimmer 
Show Card Writer 
3 Outdoor Sign Painter 
3 RAILROADER 
3 ILLUSTRATOR 
3 DESIGNER 
3 BOOKKEEPER 
3 Stenographer and Typist 
3 Cert. Public Accountant 
3 Railway Accountant 
3 Commercial Law 
3 GOOD ENGLISH 
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3 Common School Subjects 
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If name of Course you want is not in this list, write it below 



Answer Department 

(Continued from page 150) 
Kay. — Dustin Farnum in "The Son of 
Erin." Elmar Linden in "Carmen." Mon- 
tague Love in "Bought and Paid For." 

Mary C. — Mary, please dont ask me if I 
think there is a chance for you in pictures. 
I have answered this question so many 
times. One girl wrote me that she had a 
face that only a mother could love and 
wanted to know if I thought she had a 
chance. How do I know? 

F. R. M. Hollister; Mrs. H. B.; Joseph- 
ine A.; Mrs. M. G.; E. S. P.; Texas Twins; 
Marian M.; Harry S.; EvaM.; MarjorieW.; 
Anna N.; Floyd D.; Oscar D. G.; D. D. S.; 
William McK.; Mary K.; Harold Lock- 
wood Admirer; V. K., Berkeley; Mawvine S. 
— Your questions have been answered before. 

Photoplay Reviews 

(Continued from page 15) 
less are — faults to be found, criticisms to 
be made ; but the writer did not see tHem ! 
"Joan the Woman" is, in the writer's own 
mind, the biggest treat on Broadway ! 

R. B. C. 
"Joan the Woman." — I concur in about 
all R. B. C. says, but I would add a dis- 
senting note regarding the interpretation 
of Miss Farrar, for I think she was. mis- 
cast. There was nothing of the visionary, 
the spirituelle, the naivete, in her inter- 
pretation, and she was rather the cool, cal- 
culating, designing, masterful woman, 
which is not at all the kind of person I 
understand Joan to have been. I also 
think that Wallace Reid did not quite 
measure up to his heroic part, and that 
Hobart Bosworth looked and acted the 
warrior so superbly as to make Mr. Reid 
look like a matinee soldier by comparison. 

J. 

STAGE PLAYS THAT ARE WORTH WHILE 

(Readers in distant towns will do well to 

preserve this list for reference when these 

speaking plays appear in their vicinity.) 

Hippodrome.— "The Big Show." A tre- 
mendous spectacle of dazzling scenery, 
music, ballet, dancing, skating, and fanciful 
acts that will offend nobody and delight 
everybody. A veritable circus, drama, opera 
and comedy combined, in which there are 
a hundred novelties and a thousand people. 

Playhouse. — "The Man Who Came Back." 
A strong, gripping drama that holds the 
interest from beginning to end; superbly 
acted by Henry Hull and Mary Nash. 

Century. — "The Century Girl." The big- 
gest musical show New York ever saw, and 
in its most beautiful theater. The talk of 
the town. 



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Gaiety. — "Turn to the Right." One of the 
t>ig hits of the season. Review later. 

Punch and Judy. — "Treasure Island." If 
you like fairy stories (with fierce pirates as 
fairies) and the sea, and picturesque settings 
— including a real ship — and Stevenson's sea 
yarns, dont miss this elaborate production. 
It is exceedingly amusing. The young folks 
will be held spellbound, and the old folks 
will have a hearty laugh. It is handsomely 
and wonderfully done. 

Booth. — "Getting Married." A Bernard 
Shaw play that sparkles witn wit and Shaw 
philosophy, capably played by an unusually 
strong cast which includes "William Faver- 
sham, Henrietta Crosman, Charles Cherry 
and Hilda Spong. 

Cohan's. — "Come Out of the Kitchen." 
Ruth Chatterton is always charming, but 
her opportunities in this Southern play are 
not as winsome as those in "Daddy Long- 
legs," even with Bruce McRae to assist her. 

Lyric. — "A Daughter of the Gods." Fox's 
"Picture Beautiful" with Annette Kellermann 
as the star submersible and dancing Venus. 
A very elaborate spectacle. 

Longacre. — "Nothing But the Truth." A 
clever farce which William Collier makes 
uproariously funny from curtain to curtain. 

Eltinge. — "Cheating Cheaters." A thrilling 
crook-play, full of suspense, surprises and a 
few good laughs. Mgrjorie Rambeau and 
entire company are fine. 

Broadway. — "Twenty Thousand Leagues 
Under the Sea." See Photoplay Reviews. 

44th Street Theater. — "Joan the Woman." 
See Photoplay Reviews. 

48th Street— "The Thirteenth Chair." A 
weird but gripping drama written around a 
"spiritualist" and her seances. Margaret 
Wycherly scores heavily as the star, and the 
play is one of the best in New York. By 
author of "Within the Law" — Bayard Vel- 
lier. 

Astor. — "Her Soldier Boy." A fine, tune- 
ful musical comedy with Clifton Crawford, 
Adele Rowland and other stars. 

Belasco. — "Little Lady in Blue." Frances 
Starr in a charming, romantic comedy. 

Winter Garden. — "The Show of Wonders." 
A delightful conglomeration of a little of 
everything for everybody, mostly music. 

Loew's N. Y. and Loew's American Roof. — 
Photoplays; first runs. Program changes 
every week. 

Rialto. — Photoplays supreme. Program 
changes every week. 

Strand. — Select first-run photoplays. Pro- 
gram changes every week. 



SUCCESSFUL PLAYS NOW ON THE ROAD 

"Object Matrimony." Another "Potash and Perl- 
mutter" and "Abe and Mawrus" comedy. Immensely 
pleasing to those who like this style of humor. 

"The Flame." A remarkably beautiful spectacular 
drama satirizing President Wilson's Mexican policy. 
Disjointed construction, and plot is not strong; but, 
nevertheless, it stands out as a clever, artistic and 
entertaining play. 

(Continued on page 157) 




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WANTED! 

Send us TOUR IDEAS for Photoplays, Stories, 
Etc. ! They may bring BIG MONEY ! Rowland 
Thomas, an "unknown writer," won a $5,000 
prize. Elaine Sterne, another beginner, re- 
ceived $1,000 from the "Sun." 

You Have Ideas 

If you go to the movies, if you read maga- 
zines — then you know the find of material 
editors want. Special education is NOT RE- 
QUIRED. Writing is open to ALL CLASSES. 
The Editor of AMERICAN MAGAZINE says: 
"The best reading matter is as frequently ob- 
tained from absolutely new writers as it is 
from famous writers." EVERY life has its 
story ! 

Your Ideas Taken in Any Form 

We will accept your ideas in ANY form — 
either as finished scripts or as mere outlines 
of plots. Send us your Bare Ideas. Outlines. 
Plots, Synopses or Finished Stories. 

Your Ideas Corrected Free 

If your work shows merit— but needs correction 
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scripts are sold on commission. No cha.rse is 
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A Child of Fortune 

(Continued from page 97) 
. . . Sweet Norma Talmadge has the 
most wonderful eyes in the world . . ." 
And so forth and so on. It was all very 
pleasant, very refreshing, and equally en- 
lightening ! Also, I would chronicle it 
here that not once, when seemingly hun- 
dreds of personalities were discussed, did 
Miss Murray say a single unpleasant or 
unkind word of any one— "Goodness, 
but Cecil DeMille is a wonder!" 

Obviously, Miss Murray is correct in 
her belief that she is a favorite daughter 
of the gods, for few girls have had more 
golden opportunities than she. Almost 
at the very beginning of her stage 
career, in "The Follies of 1908," she be- 
came famous overnight thru her archly 
fascinating portrayal of the Nell Brink- 
ley Girl — "and I had my salary raised 
from twenty-five to seventy-five the very 
first week," she announced proudly. 
Later she made a hit in a dramatic part 
in "Her Little Highness," with Mitzi 
Hajos — "about the only real part I played 
before the footlights; and once, during 
the Boston engagement, I played the title 
role, owing to the star's illness. My ! that 
was a happy experience," and her whole 
expression plainly showed that it was. 
She afterward was one of the pioneers in 
the modern dances, set amid a cabaret 
background, lending a refinement and 
dignity little known previously to the pro- 
fessional restaurant dancer. After that, 
during the phenomenally successful run 
of "Watch Your Step," at the New Am- 
sterdam Theater, she was selected, above 
all other terpsichorean artists, to tem- 
porarily replace Mrs. Vernon Castle dur- 
ing that star's illness, and this upon only 
a few hours' notice, too ! Then came her 
unlooked-for hit in "The Follies of 1915," 
and after that Lasky screen stardom. 

Oh, my, yes ; Mae Murray is right. 
She is certainly a child of fortune ! 

When Marguerite Bertsch, Vitagraph's 
woman director, was looking for a scene of 
Hades in her new play, "The Devil's Prize," 
she heard that E. H. Sothern was working 
in a set that might do. She hurried to him, 
and questioned him. "Do you think we 
could use this for a hell?" she asked, and 
E. H. Sothern, who had worked hard all 
one hot day in that set, knew. "I can rec- 
ommend it," he answered emphatically. 



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MOT I OX PICTURE MAGAZINE 



157 



{Continued from page 155) 

"Under Sentence." A strong, gripping drama which 
has heen hailed as another "Lion and the Mouse." It 
should enjoy a long run. 

"Rich Man, Poor Man." One of the most engross- 
ing dramas that George Broadhurst ever wrote, and 
one of the popular plays of the season. 

"Mr. Antonio." A drama full of heart interest, 
in which the inimitable Otis Skinner plays the 
part of a picturesque organ-grinder splendidly, sup- 
ported by Eleanor Woodruff and a good company. 

"The Boomerang." One of the most popular 
comedies of recent years. Entertaining and laugh- 
able thruout, exquisitely acted and wonderfully pro- 
duced — it runs along like the works of a fine watch. 

"Paganini." George Arliss in a very clever char- 
acterization. A high-class comedy on the order of 
"Beau Brummell," "Garrtck" and "Mr. Lazarus." 

"His Bridal Night." A farce in which the Dolly 
Sisters, famous dancers, get so mixed up that the 
bridegroom cannot tell them apart. Result, several 
highly interesting situations, as you can easily imagine. 

"Somebody's Luggage." A farce that is different, 
in that James T. Powers plays a "low comedy" part. 
He seems a trifle out of place at first, but when one 
gets used to lym he wins a roar of laughter. In this 
particular line he has no superiors. 

"The Silent Witness." A virile drama on the order 
of "The House of Glass" and "The Co-Respondent," 
and quite as good, containing some tense and thrill- 
ing moments. A play that holds the interest from 
start to finish, giving a fine cast some excellent 
opportunities. 

"Sybil." One of the hits of last season. A very 
pleasing musical comedy with Julia Sanderson, Donald 
Brian and Joseph Cawthorn. 

"Our Little Wife." A fairly good farce, with lots 
of laughs, but Margaret Illington is rather miscast. 

"Seven Chances." A bashful young man has seven 
chances to marry and inherit $12,000,000. His efforts 
to get a wife are excruciatingly funny. An excellent 
cast, with Carroll McComas, makes this a bright farce 
well worth while. 

"Pollyanna." A glad play after the order of "Daddy 
Long-legs," "Peg o' My Heart" and. "The Cinderella 
Man"; intensely interesting and beautifully done. A 
big hit. 

PATTER FROM THE PACIFIC 

By DICK MELBOURNE 

Chester Conklin, the inimitable "Mr. Wal- 
rus" of the Keystone forces, has just com- 
pleted a two-reel comedy entitled "Double 
Trouble," in which he plays both the proprie- 
tor of a millinery store and his wicked twin 
brother. Chester thought of the idea for the 
story and assisted in the directing of the 
picture in conjunction with Harry Williams. 
Then he played two parts in the comedy. 
He sure is some versatile boy. 

Speaking of Keystone, Juanita Hansen, the 
"beautiful blonde," is now appearing in some 
"polite" comedies at this plant for a change. 
Juanita says that she doesn't know what to 
make of it. She hasn't been slammed in the 
face with a blackberry pie, or hit on the 
head with a stuffed brick, for two whole 
months, and things don't seem a bit natural 
without this informality being accomplished. 

"The Eyes of the World," which is running 
in Los Angeles at Chine's Auditorium, has 
made quite a hit here, but especially so the 
acting of Monroe Salisbury in this ten-reel 
feature. He appears in the opening and 
closing scenes, and is the main figure in the 
pictured story of the well-known Harold 
Bell Wright. 

(Continued on page 161) 




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Breaking Into the Movies in California 

{Continued from page 94) 
She snapped : "You cant see him." I 
asked about an engagement. "Engage- 
ment !" she shrieked ; "why, we have over 
a hundred on our list now!" I turned to 
leave ; one of the little puppies tripped 
me and I sprawled on the floor, bump- 
ing my head. Well, if I didn't get an 
engagement, I did a souvenir, at Kalem 
Company's. 

There are quite a few studios a little 
further out on Sunset Boulevard, but 
they were further than I expected. 
Must have walked two miles before ,1 
came to Nestor Film Company" (Chris- 
tie Comedies). And such a* shock! A 
great sign adorned the door, which 
read : "KEEP OUT— NO ENGAGE- 
MENTS. IF YOU WERE A 
THOUSAND TIMES GREATER 
THAN MARY PICKFORD O R 
CHARLIE CHAPLIN WE COULD 
NOT USE YOU/' Well, I have al- 
ways been noted for my nerve, but af- 
ter reading that sign I felt like a hun- 
gry tramp passing a farmhouse where 
freshly baked pies reposed on the win- 
dow-sill, with a great, furious-looking 
dog sitting underneath. Across the 
street I went to the L-Ko Company. 
Thev also had a sign on the office door: 
" K'E E P OUT — NO ENGAGE- 
MENTS." It was getting late, so I 
started back to town. On the corners 
newsboys were loudly yelling: "Extra! 
Extra! Suicide of movie queen!" I 
hastily bought a paper. Marie Landis, 
from Cincinnati, an extra girl em- 
ployed at Griffith's Reliance, had drunk 
carbolic acid near Bimmiany's Baths. 
She came to Los Angeles a year ago, 
hoping to become a great movie star, 
was not a success, and, out of funds, 
she chose the crooked path. When 
she was deserted, death seemed the 
only way out. Oh ! why isn't there 
some way to keep girls away from Los 
Angeles and the movies! Little diary, 
I hope girls all over the U. S. will read 
and heed you. Am getting a little dis- 
couraged; still, I believe I'll land some- 
thing yet, and maybe next year by this 
time I'll laugh over my experiences 
breaking into the movies in California. 
{To be continued) 



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ACTING ON THE STREET 

(Continued from page 69) 
company; when Beban stopped and bar- 
tered with a fruit peddler over the price 
of an apple, the wagon also stopped. 
For inside of it was a Motion Picture 
camera with its all-seeing eye glued faith- 
fully to a knot-hole in the wagon's side 
and its operator peering thru specially 
arranged slats, ''shooting" as realistic a 
big city scene as has ever been taken. 

The same method of taking advantage 
of an unsuspecting public was utilized 
in "The Girl Who Had a Soul," a Uni- 
versal feature. In one of its scenes Mary 
Fuller, as the heroine who had a predilec- 
tion for picking pockets, was followed up 
Fifth Avenue by a earner a- wagon that, 
to all outward appearances, seemed to 
be an express truck. The avenue was 
crowded with a stylish assortment of 
promenaders at the time, who little 
thought that they were playing for the 
pictures as they walked. An amusing 
sequel of this particular episode was that, 
at Forty-sixth Street, when Miss Fuller, 
, according to the action of the scene, at- 
tempted to pick the pocket of a fellow- 
actress, she was observed by an innocent 
passer-by, who, being unaware of the 
raison d'etre, set up a great cry. .A huge 
crowd collected, and Miss Fuller was 
actually arrested by the traffic officer who 
ran from his post. Meanwhile, the in- 
domitable camera whirred away the 
whole delightful scene. The scenario 
had to be altered somewhat, but — ye 
gods ! — this zvas realism ! 

THE PHOTODRAMA 

(Continued from page 92) 
ignores the matter of presentation. It 
may be likened to an unkempt tramp 
who is refused admittance even at the 
back door, while a neat-appearing per- 
son with good manners is invited in the 
front door without question. 

It is a natural assumption that the 
writer who expresses his ideas in a care- 
less and slipshod manner is ignorant, 
and therefore unworthy of serious con- 
sideration. 

flere is a point, then, that is well 
worth the aspiring and successful play- 
wright's earnest and untiring practice. 
(Continued in the April issue) 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



161 



(Continued from page 157) 

Lamar Johnstone has returned from his 
trip to South America, where he supported 
Tyrone Power in "The Planter." Lamar 
has many interesting tales to relate of his 
experiences there. He declares that he 
learnt much there as to the causes of revo- 
lutions, and other interesting topics, but 
that when it comes down to a choice there 
isn't any comparison between the good old 
United States and a southern republic. 

The two Farnum boys, Dustin and Will- 
iam, are both working at the Fox studios- on 
the Coast. William Farnum is working in 
"A Tale of Two Cities," which is nearing 
completion under the direction of Frank 
Lloyd, who is proving a very capable pilot 
of William's emotions. William Desmond 
Taylor, who directed Dustin with the Pallas 
Company, is directing him with Fox, and as 
they know each other thoroly they get along 
splendidly. 

Ben Turpin of the Vogue forces, and Hank 
Mann, chief funmaker of the Fox Company,, 
had an argument while dining together in 
Levy's Cafe the other night, and in which 
the banged-up Ben is said to have come out 
on top. Both comedians owe much of their 
funny business to their eyes: Hank with 
that shifting pair of optics, and Ben with 
the one straight and one crossed eye. "I'm 
funnier than you, and you know it," said 
Mann, grinning over at Ben. "You are 
not!" retorted Ben. "You have to act in 
order to be funny. I can't help it. I was 
born this way!" 

Edward Sloman, the American director, 
is busy on another production with William 
Russell as his star. "My Fighting Gentle- 
man" is the name of the new feature, and it 
is said that Russell is doing the best work 
of his career under Sloman's able direction. 
Francelia Billington is supporting Russell in 
this feature. 

Little Mary Sunshine, the tiny Balboa star, 
is a very temperamental young lady, but very 
fond of her director, Henry King. When she 
learnt that she was going to play in another 
picture in which she had to have a papa, she 
told the Horkheimer brothers that Henry 
King must play the part. "He's a awful 
good actor," she said; "honest he is!" 

George Periolat, the make-up king of the 
American Company, gets quite peeved when 
he sees some of the make-ups that are 
flashed on the screen. He insists that a 
good make-up is essential, and always spends 
a great amount of time on each of his many 
characterizations that he is called upon to 
portray. He gets photographs from real 
life, and plans his make-up accordingly. 

Charles Ray, the Ince-Triangle star, is 
hard at work at the Culver City studios 
once more. After he signed his new agree- 
ment, which calls for him to be starred 
alone, Charlie was given a two-week vaca- 
tion as an appreciation of his earnest work 
during the past year. 

(Continued on page 163) 




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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




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The Boy Who Couldn't Keep a Job 

(Continued from page 74) 
to gain an insight into the real silent 
drama, I acted for the Pathe Company. 

"Thereafter I joined the Edison play- 
ers as leading man. The photoplays that 
I most enjoyed, as I remember them, 
and in which I think I did myself the 
most injustice, were 'Ransons Folly,' 
with Mabel Trunnelle ; 'The Working of 
a Miracle/ with Gladys Hulette, and 
The Innocence of Ruth,' with Viola 
Dana. 

''Last spring," resumed Edward Earle, 
"Viola Dana went to the Metro Company, 
and, as I considered that she was my 
ideal opposite, I decided to follow her 
thither. So," he concluded, with a 
flourish of the spoon above the dimpling 
rarebit, "there we are now, and we have 
appeared together in 'The Light of Hap- 
piness' and 'The Gates of Eden.' In pass- 
ing, I might mention that between Miss 
Dana and myself there is no jealousy, 
no desire to 'hog the camera,' and that 
we get along beautifully together. She 
has both the trained technique of the 
professional and the charm and enthu- 
siasm of the beginner. 

"There isn't much more to say," he 
laughed. "The little boy who couldn't 
keep a job has at last found his heaven 
on earth, I guess. I have some outside 
pleasures — tennis, motoring and reading 
good romances, such as my friends, 
Stevenson and O. Henry. Then, too, I 
take apparently trivial things in pictures 
quite seriously. As soon as I receive a 
new scenario to study, I make a costume 
plot of each scene and set to work to 
apply appropriate costumes to each." 

I inquiringly glanced at a tumbled 
pile of letters. 

"Oh, as for those," laughed my host, 
"my correspondents hail from all over the 
world, and I number each and every one 
a friend. That is one of my little hob- 
bies, too," he confided, "to sit down and 
write nice, frank answers to them." 

"Writing as a fine art?" I queried. 

"Hardly that," he smiled, until his 
dimples were cut in like intaglios; "but 
I have had a struggle and a big pull all 
my life, you understand, and if there is 
anything I can say to cheer other little 
I am going to say it." 



boys and girls 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



163 



{Continued from page 161) 

Harry McCoy and Hugh Fay are both busy 
directing their respective companies at the 
Keystone plant. Strangely enough, both 
were promoted to their present rank after 
"She Loved a Sailor," in which both were 
featured. Mack Sennett appreciates talent, 
and his reward to Harry and Hugh is the 
result of their faithful service. 

Grace Cunard and Francis Ford are as- 
tonishing the populace at Hollywood these 
days, by the big sets and scenes they are 
staging for the "Purple Mask" serial, in 
which they are starred together. They are 
working at their own studio, the stages of 
which were built especially for their extra 
large sets, and the other day fourteen hun- 
dred extras crowded right on at one time, 
and a section of the stage gave way, causing 
the filming of the scene to be held, up for 
three hours while the carpenters labored 
to repair the damage. 

Bessie Barriscale is soon to be seen in 
some more strong dramatic subjects such as 
"The Payment," "The Cup of Life," "The 
Devil," and "The Green Swamp," which will 
give her more opportunity to display her 
wonderful emotional talents. 

Margarita Fischer hopped into Los An- 
geles last week from her San Diego studio 
just to look about the shops. Husband 
Harry Pollard came along, and showed us 
an empty check-book to show that Margarita 
had made good use of her eyesight. "Gosh, 
but clothes cost a lot!" he told us confiden- 
tially. Now who would have thought it? 

Cleo Madison is delighted with the loca- 
tion of her studio on Boyle Heights, and de- 
clares it to be an ideal plant to work in. 
She insists that it is situated way above the 
fog that settles over the others every once 
in awhile, and thinks she will save a lot of 
time because of this fact. 

Helen Holmes and her company of players 
have returned from a long trip to Bear 
Valley, where they filmed quite a number of 
scenes for "A Lass of the Lumberlands" 
serial. Helen says that she had to sleep out 
in tents all the time of their stay. She took 
her little adopted daughter along with her, 
as she could not bear to be away from her 
for such a long time. Besides, Dorothy 
Holmes McGowan is playing an important 
part in the story, and had to be taken along 
for that reason alone, if for no other. Some 
actress, too! 

Bobby Harron is now starring for the Fine 
Arts at the studios on Sunset Boulevard. 
Some happy boy, too! 

The players are just flooding themselves 
with new cars, and there seems to be a land- 
slide of orders with the different auto agents 
here. Harry McCoy has a new Mercer race- 
about, as have Blanche Sweet and Marshall 
Neilan. Wally Reid is roving about in a 
Roamer, and Clarence Kolb has a peach of a 
Fiat racer. Charlie Ray caught the fever, 
and purchased for himself a Stutz "Bear 
Cat' 5 and a Mercer six-passenger, while 
Harold Lockwood is tickled with his Mar- 



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164 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




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up his new Delage racing creation. 





THE ANSWER IvADX 



By ROSE TAPLEY 

Editorial Note: Letters for this department 
should be addressed to Miss Rose Tapley, care of 
Vitagraph Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Tapley will 
answer by mail if an addressed, stamped envelope is 
enclosed. While the articles entitled "How to Get In" 
are running, Miss Tapley will not answer letters on 
that subject, nor will she answer any questions in the 
Magazine that are not of general interest, nor any 
that properly belong to the Department of The 
Answer Man. 

Melvin H. — Sometimes they do and some- 
times they dont. 

Harry N. from Honolulu. — I am glad if 
I was able to do anything to make your 
trip to America more interesting. Indeed, I 
shall be glad to hear from you again. You 
have my best wishes for a safe voyage home 
and a happy reunion with your friends and 
family when you reach there. 

Dear Dorothea. — I want to thank you for 
your kind letter. I am trying to arrange to 
make a tour of the country this winter and 
to meet a few of my friends in that way, 
as I feel that I want to know them person- 
ally. I had a wonderful visit in Chicago at 
the Exposition. Thank you for offering to 
help me in the contest, but I dont believe 
my name has been in the running at all. 

Dear Lena. — Creighton Hale played 
Laughing Mask, I believe. Address Miss 
White care of Pathe. 

Dear Ida R. from Pittsburgh. — I shall 
show your letter to Mr. Brewster. I am sure 
there is some mistake or some very good 
reason for not printing the letter mentioned, 
as Mr. Brewster is exceedingly kind and 
just. I am very fond of Norma. Why not 
write to the Scenario Service Bureau which 
is connected with the Motion Picture Maga- 
zine and they will give you a great deal of 
help with your scenario? My birthday, dear, 
was June 30th. 

Rex Boy. — I am sure that I am delighted 
whenever I get a letter from any of my boys, 
big or little, so write as often as you like, 
provided you dont insist upon a prompt 
reply, as my mail is very heavy. I wish you 
much success with your scenario. Good 
luck, dear. 

(Continued on page 167) 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



165 




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AreThey Married? If So, To Whom? 

The Much-dreaded Question — the Bane of Players and Answer Man — Answered at 
Last! 

Is he married? Is she married? These crisp and poignant questions are asked a million times a day. 
The Answer Man receives scores of the tabooed questions in every mail; the. players themselves are 
haunted with the fatal interrogation; and then there is the unspoken query, "Is he married? — Is she mar- 
ried?" that pops into the head of thousands in the audience nightly and refuses to be either uttered out 
loud or answered. 

The Matrimonial Sphinx Has at Last Consented to Speak! 

In the April number of the Motion Picture Magazine the bars will be let down (with a bang) and 
a selected list of one hundred famous players will be led into the corral, there to be branded as "Married" 
or "Unmarried." Where we know the happy, but previously undiscovered husband or wife, their names, too, 
will ornament the list. It is the most complete marital registry ever recorded on one big page! And, one 
thing more: the Sphinx is in a loquacious mood. Along with the marriage records he promises to give the 
honest-to-goodness age of each and every one on the big list. 

Watch for the April number, out March 1st, and quench for all time the burning 
questions, "Is he married? Is she married?" 



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You Have a Beautiful Face— But Your Nose? 

N this day and age attention to your appearance is an absolute necessity if you expect 
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TRILETY. Face Specialist 779 Ackerman Bldg., Binghamton, N.Y. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION riCTl RE MAGAZINE. 



166 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



City Physicians Explain Why They Prescribe Nuxated 

Iron to Make Beautiful, Healthy Women, 

and Strong, Vigorous Men 

Now Being Used by Over Three Million People Annually 

Quickly transforms the flabby flesh, toneless tissues, and pallid cheeks of weak, anaemic 

men and women into a perfect glow of health and beauty — often increases the 

strength of delicate, nervous, run-down folks 200' per cent in two weeks' time 




It is conservatively estimated that over three million 
people annually in this country alone are taking Nux- 
ated Iron. Such astonishing results have been reported 
from its use both by doctors and laymen, that a num- 
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country have been asked to explain why they prescribe 
it so extensively, and why it apparently produces so 
much better results than were obtained from the old 
forms of inorganic iron. 

Extracts from some of the letters received are given 
below: 

Dr. King, a New York 
physician and author, 
says: "There can be no 
vigorous iron^rmen with- 
out iron. 

Pallor means anaemia. 

Anaemia means iron 
deficiency. The skin of 
anaemic men and women 
is pale, the flesh flabby, 
the muscles lack tone, the 
brain fags and the mem- 
ory fails and they often 
become weak, nervous, 
irritable, despondent and 
melancholy. When the 
iron goes from the blood 
of women, the roses go 
from their cheeks. 

In the most common foods of America, the starches, 
sugars, table syrups, candies, polished rice, white bread, 
soda crackers, biscuits, macaroni, spaghetti, tapioca, 
sago, farina, degerminated cornmeal, no longer is iron to 
be found. Refining processes have removed the iron of 
Mother Earth from these impoverished foods, and silly 
methods of home cookery, by throwing down the waste- 
pipe the water in which our vegetables are cooked is 
responsible for another grave iron loss. 

Therefore, if you wish to preserve your youthful vim 
and vigor to a ripe age, you must supply the iron de- 
ficiency in your food by using some form of organic 
iron, just as you would use salt when your food has 
not enough salt." 

Dr. Sauer, a Boston 
physician who has studied 
both in this country and 
in great European Medi- 
cal Institutions, says:' "As 
I have said a hundred 
times over, organic iron 
is the greatest of all 
strength builders. If peo- 
ple would only throw 
away patent medicines 
and nauseous concoctions 
and take simple Nuxated 
Iron, I am convinced that 
the lives of thousands of 
persons might be saved, 
who now die every year 
from . pneumonia, grippe, 
consumption, kidney, liver 
and heart troubles, etc. 
The real and true cause 
which started their dis- 
eases was nothing more 
nor less than a weakened 
condition brought on by 
lack of iron in the blood. 

Not long ago a man came to me who was nearly 
half a century old and asked me to give him a pre- 
liminary examination for life insurance. I was aston- 
ished to find him with a blood pressure of a boy of 20 
and as full of vigor, vim and vitality as a young man; 




in fact, a young man he really was, notwithstanding 
his age. The secret, he said, was taking iron — nux- 
ated iron had filled him with renewed life. At 30 he 
was in bad health; at 46 he was care-worn and nearly 
all in — now at 50, after taking Nuxated Iron, a miracle 
of vitality and his face beaming with the buoyancy of 
youth. 

Iron is absolutely necessary to enable your blood to 
change food into living tissue. Without it, no matter 
how much or what you eat, your food merely passes 
through you without doing you any good. You don't 
get the- strength out of it, and as a consequence you 
become weak, pale and sickly-looking, just like a plant 
trying to grow in a soil deficient in iron. 

If you are not strong or well you owe it to yourself 
to make the following test: See how long you can 
work or how far you can walk without becoming tired. 
Next take two five-grain tablets of ordinary nuxated 
iron three times per day after meals for two weeks. 
Then test your strength again and see how much you 
have gained. I have seen dozens of nervous, run-down 
people who were ailing all the while double their strength 
and endurance and entirely rid themselves of all symp- 
toms of dyspepsia, liver and other troubles in from ten 
to fourteen days' time, simply by taking iron in the 
proper form. And this, after they had in some cases 
been doctoring for months without obtaining any benefit. 
But don't take the old forms of reduced iron, iron 
acetate, or tincture of iron simply to save a few cents. 
The iron demanded by Mother Nature for the red col- 
oring matter in the blood of her children is, alas! not 
that kind of iron. You must take iron in a form that 
can be easily absorbed and assimilated to do you any 
good, otherwise it may prove worse than useless. Many 
an athlete and prize-fighter has won the day simply 
because he knew the secret of great strength and en- 
durance and filled his blood with iron before he went 
into the affray; while 
many another has gone 
down in inglorious defeat 
simply for the lack of 
iron." 

Dr. Schuyler C. Jaques, 
another New York phy- 
sician, said: "I have, 
never before given out | 
any medical information 
or. advice for publication, 
as I ordinarily do not be- 
lieve in it. But in the 
case of Nuxated Iron I 
feel I would be remiss 
in my duty not to men- 
tion it. I have taken it 
myself and given it to 
my patients with most 
surprising and satisfac- 
tory results. And those who wish quickly to increase 
their strength, power and endurance will find it a most 
remarkable and wonderfully effective remedy." 

NOTE. — Nuxated Iron is not a patent medicine nor secret 
remedy, but. one which is well known to druggists and whose 
iron constituents are widely prescribed by eminent physicians 
everywhere. Unlike the older inorganic iron products, it is 
easily assimilated, does not injure the teeth, make them black 
nor upset the stomach; on the contrary, it is a most potent 
remedy, in nearly all forms of indigestion, as well as for 
nervous run-down conditions. The manufacturers have such 
great confidence in Nuxated Iron that they offer to forfeit 
$100.00 to any charitable institution if they cannot take any 
man or woman under 60 who lacks iron and increase their 
strength 200 per cent, or over in four weeks time provided 
they have no serious organic trouble. They also offer to re- 
tunri your money if it does not at least double your strength 
and endurance in ten days. It is dispensed by all good 
druggists. 




When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



167 



(Continued from page 164) 

Dear Mariox. — Yes, I know Norma Tal- 
madge very well and she is just as pretty 
and sweet as you think her. Thank you; 
I shall be delighted to have your picture, 
altho I may not be able to send you one in 
return just now. Best love, dear child. 

Dear Dorothy. — If you will write for a 
copy of the Motion Picture Studio Directory, 
729 Seventh Ave., New York City, you will 
find a very interesting book of information 
there and will have all your questions 
answered. Creighton Hale is the one you 
mean, I think. Cant send you a photo, as I 
haven't one to send. 

Dear Girl from Chicago Who Loves Lit- 
tle Children. — I was delighted to receive 
your nice letter and to learn that you are 
taking up a special course in nursing. I 
do hope that we will meet again. 

Dear Girl from Lawtox. — I should be so 
glad to help you get into pictures if I could, 
but, dear, I simply cannot. Life is some- 
times very difficult for a girl, particularly 
if she has no mother, but, Honey, a brave 
smiling face and a willing spirit to help 
others will do much to make life more worth 
the living. Be of good cheer, dear, and fear 
only evil. 

Echoes from the Popular Player Contest 

Bushmanor, Riderwood, 
Green Spring Valley, Md., 
Dec. 26, 1916. 
My Dear Mr. Brewster: 

My Christmas was indeed a happy one. 
I just crammed the old fireplace full of 
logs at Bushmanor, wedged my way in 
among the dogs on the big lounge, sat back 
and meditated. 

You know, it was not so much winning the 
contest — it was the knowledge that you had 
such loyal, staunch friends who believed in 
you, and wanted you to win — wanted you 
to hold the place of honor. 

You know, I believe my dogs knew about 
it, for they certainly raised an 'extra row 
when I arrived. 

I envy no emperor nor king. To reign in 
the hearts of my friends is a sacred privi- 
lege gold cannot buy, nor promise of prefer- 
ment. 

Wont you, thru the columns of your 
wonderful Motion Picture Magazixe and 
Classic, convey to each and every one 
who was kind enough to vote for me, my 
sincerest thanks? 

May the coming year grant me opportuni- 
ties to prove my gratitude. 

To the photoplayers' greatest friend, the 
Motiox Picture Magazixe, I am heartily 
grateful for this opportunity, and for many 
evidences of keen sympathy manifested for 
the players in the past. Yours for a happy, 
prosperous New Year. 

Sincerely, 

Francis X. Bushman. 



fe^55J(£ 



A genuine, visible 
writing Underwood with fa- 
mous back spacer, two-color 
ribbon and tabulator — at less 
than y 2 manufacturer's price. 
Guaranteed for 5 years. Sent 
on 10 Days' Free Trial. Thi 



RENT 



SJ $10020 UNDERWOOD for $0720 

S^^-. will enable you to write quickly, legibly. | f 
I Keep carbon copies. Save arguments and \M I 

I 



will enable you to write quickly, legibly. 
Keep carbon copies. Save arguments and 
lawsuits. Earn extra money 
typing manuscripts, scena- 
rios, etc. You may rent, ap- 
plying rent on low purchase 
price — or buy, cash or easy- 
payments. Ask for Offer Xo. 50. 

Typewriter Emporium, Chicago, III 

Est. for a Quarter Century 





postcards 



photos or 

SEND FOR YOUR MOVIE FAVORITES 

All the leading stars on postcards. Send a quarter 
for eighteen of your own choice or a dollar for 
a hundred. Biilie Burke, Mary Miles Minter, 
Clara Kimball Young, Francis X. Bushman. 
Theda Bara and over 400 others that vou know. 
Actual Photographs in attractive poses, Size, 8x10, 
of all Feature Stars at fifty cents. A limited num- 
ber of scenes in which your favorites are at their 
best. Write today about that photo you wanted. 
Send a stamp for our list, sent with all orders. 
Film Portrait Co., 127 1st PI., B'klyn, N. Y. 



THE 



EMPIRE STATE 
ENGRAVING CO. 

PHOTO -ENGRAVERS 



Half-tone 



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id Line Work for Printing in 
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165-167 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK 




Beautifully Curly, 
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In three hours you can 
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rolling the hair in curlers. 

Liquid Silmerine 

is perfectly harmless. Easily applied with brush. Hair 
is nice and fluffy when combed out. Silmerine is also 
a splendid dressing. Keeps hair fine and glossy. Direc- 
tions with bottle. At your druggists' 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTIOX PICTURE MAGAZIXE. 



168 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




204 



You have never seen anything 
like this before 

The most exquisite perfume ever produced. 
Made without alcohol. Use only a drop. 
Concentrated Flower Drops bottle like 
picture with long glass stopper. Rose.Violet, 
Crabapple, $1.50; Lily of the Valley, $1.75. 
Send 20c silver, stamps for miniature bottle. 

TRADE MARK REGISTERED 

flowerfJrops i 

Flower Drops also comes in Perfume form)* 
made with alcohol in the above odors, also in 
Mon Amour and Garden Queen, the latest, 
$1.00 an ounce at druggists or by mail. _ Send 
stamps or currency. Money back if not 
pleased. Send $1.00 for Souvenir box, 6— 25c 
bottles same size as picture; different odors. 
EXACT SIZE OF BOTTLE PAUL R1EGER V 204 fffrst St., San Francisco 




JfiQ Conn Saxophone 

AN exquisite instrument, perfect in 

■**• tone, made by the master-instrument 
builder, and used by leading Saxophonists. 
Sent to you on ten days' trial. Small pay- 
ments at convenient times may be arranged. 

WriteforNewCatalog Kur'S 

Saxophone Catalog. It is free. Write today. 



Dept. 1543— Elkhart. Indiana 



Do not confuse the "Motion Picture 
Magazine" with any other publication. 
This magazine comes out on the 1st of 
each month and the "Motion Picture 
Classic" comes out on the 15th of each 
month. These are the only publications 
in which this company is interested. 

THE M. P. PUBLISHING CO., 
175 Duffield St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Beauty— Youth 

For Everyone— At Home 

Marvelously successful method-— Violet Ray 
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TheViOLETTA 

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SEND NO MONEY 

Use 10 days in own home. No risk. Write 
now for Free Violetta Booklet of immense 
value to everyone desiring health and 
beauty. Splendid offer for dealers. 

BLEADON-DUNN CO. 

Dept. A3, 208 N. Fifth Avenue, Chicago 




; 111, I. III:'! 



I'l ' 



Are We Beginning 
to Get Acquainted? 

If You Are a Bit Shy About Knowing Us, 

Here Is a Heart-to-Heart Insight 

Into Our April Contents 



II First there are the players. You see || 

|| them on the screen night after night. |; 

|| You grow to like them, but what do you f j 

11 know about their real selves? In the I! 

II April MOTION PICTURE MAGA- II 

|1 ZINE you will: || 

|| Travel to the country home of Billie | 

|| Burke and become her intimate guest — |j 

|| Attend a bachelor dinner at Carlyle Ij 

i| Blackwell's rooms and share his favorite || 

|| courses — | 

ji Hold a star-divining seance with Mar- || 

|| guerite Snow and Charlie Chaplin and | 

1 1 learn all about their inner selves — 

|| Spend a morning with Nell Craig, the || 

|1 golden girl of the Middle West — 

i| Help Theda Bara draw the veil of || 

i| mystery closer about her — her strange || 

I j ancestry, the prophecy of her birth, what j j 

I I she thinks of herself and the oddities of || 
II her new contract — 

|| Doze off and have the sweetest little 1; 

1 1 dream about William S. Hart — 

|| Hold forth in the make-up room with || 

1 1 a dozen famous players — 

1| Pay a visit of inspection to the cat- I| 

|| teries, kennels, dens and lairs of stars |j 

II who are cultivating pets, freakish and |j 

1 1 otherwise — 

II And try on four pages of the most I 

II beautiful and up-to-date gowns that the | 

Ij stars are appearing in — besides a peep at || 

1 1 their personal wardrobe. 

|| Then come home tired, but still deep- | 

II breathing, from your excursion, and in |; 

|1 the easy-chair by the firelight read a pair |j 

II of pulsing romances from coining screen f 

l| plays. Pooh! That isn't all. You'll stay j 

II up later than usual, devouring "Are They | 

II Married? If So, To Whom?" and some § 

1 1 other midnight surprises. You think you § 

1 1 know us and every angle of the plays | 

l| and players. Better get acquainted all || 

|| over again in the April number, which | 

|| makes its bow to you on March 1st. 

= =„ j,,,,,, mi mini minimum imiiiimiiiimiiiimiii iiiimimimmmimm mil r= ; 

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When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 





VERY 

DISTINCTIVE 
IN BEAUTY 
BRILLIANCY 

AND CUT 
WONDERFUL 
VALUES AT 



^ATISFAcrf 



♦25 
HO 
»50 
»75 
*100 *125 

f ASY CREDIT TEPM5 



OUR EASY CREDIT SYSTEM (OUR CHARGE ACCOUNT 
PRIVILEGE) IS OFFERED TO YOU. Send today for Catalog 
telling all about how easy we make it for you to wear and own a Genuine 
Diamond, fine Watch, or other handsome Jewelry. There are 116 pages filled 
with photographic illustrations of Diamond Rings on credit terms as low as 
$2.50 a month; Diamond La Vallieres as low as $1 a month; Diamond Ear 
Screws. Studs, Scarf Pins at $2 a month; Brooches at $1 a month. All our 
Diamonds are characterized by dazzling brilliancy and wide-spread effect, 
and set in solid gold and platinum. Also solid gold Watches at $3. 60 a month; 
Wrist Watches. $1.50 a month, etc. SEND FOR CATALOG. Whatever you 
select will be sent, all shipping charges prepaid by us. You see and exam- 
ine the article right in your own hands. If you are convinced thBt you are 
getting a big bargain, pay one-fifth of the purchase price and keep it, bal- 
ance divided into eight equal amounts, payable monthly. If not just what 
you wish, return at our expense. You assume no risk, you are under no 
obligations. SEND FOR CATALOG TODAY. IT IS FREE. 

LOFTIS BROS. & CO., The National Credit Jewelers 

Dept. L615 lOO to 108 N. State Street, Chicago. IIHnois 

(Established 1&68) Stores in; Chicago : Pittsburgh : St. Louis Omaha 




JUST 
THE 
THING 
FOR A 
MOVIE 
PARTY 




@ 



MOVIE SOUVENIR PLAYING CARDS 



ET a few packs. Be the first to surprise and delight your friends by giving a " Movie Card 
Party" — the latest social fad. A veritable picture gallery of celebrities of the Movie World -4/ 
treated with such genius that it is the greatest novelty ever made in Souvenir Playing ^ * 



,-- 






Cards. Complete for playing all card games. 

The faces show 53 half-tone portraits of celebrities you love to see in film action — ^ «. ^^^ 
the "Stars Who Made the Movies Famous" — including such favorites as Geraldine ^ J*i? £&* 
Farrar, Francis X. Bushman, Beverly Bayne, Clara Kimball Young, Kathlyn W r il- ^ 4* JfafiF 
hams, Wm. S. Hart, Mary Miles Minter, Henry B. Walthall, and Anna Pavlowa. 

Price 50 cents at your dealers or direct from us by mail postpaid 

If your dealer cannot supply you, use Coupon — Mail Today. 

MOVIE SOUVENIR CARD CO. 

Department B Cincinnati, Ohio 




170 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




It fits the pocket. 



Pictures 



The New 2Q Kodak Jr. 

A thin, slim camera for pictures of the somewhat 
elongated post card shape — but just a trifle smaller — 
it fits the pocket. 

Accurate and reliable, because made in the factories 
where honest workmanship has become a habit, simple 
in operation, it meets every requirement in hand 
camera photography. Autographic of course, all the 
folding Kodaks now are. 

No. 2C Autographic Kodak Jr., with Kodak Ball Bearing shutter having 

speeds up to T fo of a second and meniscus achromatic lens, . . $12.00 

Ditto, with Rapid Rectilinear lens, 14.00 

Ditto, with Kodak Anastigmat lens, fj.7, . . . . . . 19.00 

All Dealers' '. 

EASTMAN KODAK CO., Rochester, N. Y., The Kodak City. 



THE WILLIAM G. HEWITT PRESS, 61-67 NAVY ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



' 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIilHUlllllllUIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllll HUHBIIIHIfe 




Any Weather Is Billiard 

\\T ■ ] I And Any Home Has Room 

W eatner ! For a Brunswick Table 



Carom and Pocket Billiards are a captivating 
sport, and nowadays the Brunswick Home Table 
is the family playground. When school lets 
out it quickens home-bound footsteps. 

Soon then the clicking balls proclaim that 
eager eyes are training to debate dad's mastery 
when he arrives from work. 

This manly love of skillful achievement is 
built right into these scientific Brunswicks. They 
are packed full of health, they are wrapped with 
tense moments, and 
they'' re brimming o<ver 
with raillery and 
laughter! 

Used By Experts 

Many professionals 
use Brunswick Home 
Tables. Accurate an- 
gles, fast ever-level beds 
and quick-acting Mon- 
arch cushions give them 
expert playing qualities. 

Fine oak and hand- 
somely figured mahog- 
any, richly inlaid and 
built to last a lifetime. 



-BR\JNSWIC1\, 

HOME BILLIARD TABLES 



The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co.. 
Dept.45 A. 623-633 S. Wabash Ave., 
Chicago. 

Without incurring any obligation I would 
like to receive a copy of your color-catalog 

" Billiards— The Home Magnet" 



Name 



Address. 



All reproduced in actual colors in our de luxe 
catalog. Write for free copy today. 

Low Prices — Free Trial 

Test any Brunswick 30 days at home zvi&pay 
while you play, if you keep the table. Prices 
are low because we are selling to thousands. 

Balls, Cues, Expert Book of 33 games, etc., 
given free with each table. 

Mail This 
Coupon Today 

Learn how our 
"QuickDemountables" 
can be set up anywhere 
and put in a closet when 
not in use. See the 
"Grand* 'and celebrated 
"Baby Grand." 

Get full information 
and color-pictures of ta- 
bles in our latest catalog 
-Billiards- "The Home 
Magnet.'* The coupon 
brings a copy free by 
return mail. Sena today. 



Ii:i:;!:i!iiiii!!ini!iii'i: !M| 1 :iii..!:iiii.iii:;iiiiii 1 i;iiii!.ni:.,inii! iiiiihiiiih ■;• ;,f 



/ *** 



*» 



One Clo?&Up 
SlnoWS" — — 

The powerful lens of the Motion Picture 
Camera magnifies the complexion on the Screen 
in "close-ups" to such an extent that most close- 
ups are unpleasant to look at. Not so with 

Kathlyn Williams 

because as she says: "Every blessed day I use 

SempreQovine 

Pronounced Sem pray Jove nay 

Meaning Always Young" 






•«■*,... 





The fink 
(gmplexion (ake 

and it really keeps my skin perfectly smooth. I was astonished to notice the wonder- 
ful qualities of Sempre Giovine and have recommended it to all my friends in the 
profession, and now take this opportunity of recommending it to you." 

We can think of no stronger evidence of the merits of Sempre Giovine than Miss 
Williams' sincere recommendation. Notice Kathlyn Williams' wonderfully smooth 
skin; how even in " close-ups" it shows her selection has been a wise one. 

Sempre Giovine is a complexion-aid and skin-cleanser in convenient cake form. The in- 
gredients from which it is made soothe the skin and keep the 
complexion faultlessly clear. There is nothing made like it. One 
trial will convince you. 

At any drug store or Toilet Goods Department, 50 cents. Send 

coupon for Free Sample and 12- 
color panel posed for by the 
Magazine Cover Girl. 



SfflmVWHZAWmWVMBJVWVAW&VU 



MARIETTA STANLEY CO.. 
Dept. 1543. Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Please send me the 
D 7-day cake of Sempre Giovine alone. I enclose 4c. 

LI 7-day cake of Sempre Giovine and the 1 2-coIor 
Sempre Giovine Girl panel. 1 enclose 1 0c. 
(Check the square opposite your choice.) 

Name 



Marietta Stanley Company 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 





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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



Photo 
White 



The Victor Company 
announces 

a complete course 
in vocal training 

by Oscar Saenger 

in twenty lessons 

on ten Victor Records 

$25 

Soprano; Mezzo-Soprano; Tenor; Baritone; or x *=- — 

iDaenctor. 

Every student of vocal music, every aspiring 
young singer, every one who has a voice, even though 
it be untrained, can now develop his or her talents 
under the direction of Oscar Saenger— America's 
greatest and most successful vocal teacher. 

No matter where they may live, all those who wish to sing may now learn to 
do so under the direction of a master who is credited with having entered more 
pupils upon successful operatic, oratorio or concert careers than has any other 
teacher in the United States. 

The Oscar Saenger Course in Vocal Training consists of ten double-faced 
Victor Records, which provide twenty lessons in vocalization. 

There is a separate set of records for each of the following five voices: 
Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano, Tenor, Baritone, and Bass. 

For each set of lessons, perfect examples of tone production have been 
secured through Oscar Saenger's personal choice of the artists best qualified to 
serve as exemplars. 

The Oscar Saenger Course in Vocal Training for any of the voices mentioned 
above, may be procured from any Victor dealer at $25 — the cost of a one-hour 
lesson at the Saenger Studio in New York. 

Write for an illustrated booklet 

giving full information about the series of Victor Records of the Oscar Saenger Course in 
vocalization. We will gladly send a copy upon receipt of your request. 

Important Notice: All Victor Talking Machines are pat- 
ented and are only licensed, and with right of use with Victor 
Records only. All Victor Records are patented and are only 
licensed, and with right of use on Victor Talking Machines only. 
Victor Records and Victor Machines are scientifically coordi- 
nzyi and synchronized by our special processes of manufac- 
ture,' and their use, except with each other, is not only unauthor- 
ized, but damaging and unsatisfactory. 

Victrola 

VlCtrola is the Registered Trade-mark of the Victor Talking 
Machine Company designating the products of this Company only. 
Warning: The use of the word Victrola upon or in the pro- 
motion or sale of any other Talking Machine or Phonograph 
products is misleading and illegal. 






Victor Talking Machine Co., Camden, N. J. 

Berliner Gramophone Co . Montreal, Canadian Distributors 




When answering: advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



aiiiiiiiiiiaiii 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 

■Bil|]||||ll|[|||!!lllt!l!ll!lllllli!ll!llllll!lll!l!ll!ll!l!l!l!llllli™ 



Become a Players' Portrait 

Collector 

We Will Start You Of f With 
A Splendid Set of 80 Portraits 



To those interested in Motion Pictures there is a no more interesting 
diversion for the long winter evenings than the collecting and mounting 
of' players' portraits. 

Thousands of readers of the Motion Picture Magazine are now enthusi- 
astic portrait collectors, and their rooms and dens are decorated with hun- 
dreds of players' portraits, framed, passe-partouted or mounted in ingenious 
designs on cardboard to meet the various tastes of their owners. 

Many of these portraits are cut from the Motion Picture Magazine, but 
this practice spoils the magazine for future use. 

To meet the constantly increasing demand we are now offering FREE 
with a year's subscription to either the Magazine or Classic a set of 80 
— 4^x8*4 unmounted rotogravure portraits. Those who have already received 
these portraits wonder how we can afford to give so many beautiful portraits 
free with the magazine at the small price of a year's subscription. The secret 
is, buying in large quantities at a large reduction in price. 

This set of portraits will prove a valuable addition to those you already 
have or give you a good start on a new collection. 

All that you have to do is to fill out coupon below and mail with regular 
year's subscription price for the Magazine or Classic. 

The portraits carefully packed will be mailed you promptly. 

Why not*send your order today? 

Jackie Saunders Fannie Ward Lillian Gish Ethel Clayton 

Virginia Pearson Cleo Ridgely Mabel Normand Carlyle Blackwell 

Kathlyn Williams Marie Doro Dorothy Gish Mollie King 

King Baggot Vivian Martin Bessie Barriscale Muriel Ostriche 

Henry B. Walthall Dustin Farnum Norma Talmadge Jane Grey 

Charles Chaplin Myrtle Stedman Douglas Fairbanks Frances Nelson 

Beatriz Michelena Lenore Ulrich Mae Busch Marguerite Courtot 

Earle Williams Edna Goodrich William S. Hart Ruth Roland 

Frank Morgan Mary Pickford Louise Glaum Annette Kellermann 

Huntley Gordon Marguerite Clark Fay Tincher Fritzi Brunette 

Anita Stewart Pauline Frederick Oil! ie Burke Mary Fuller 

Lillian Walker John Barrymore Viola Dana Mary Miles Minter 

Leah Baird Owen Moore May Allison Pearl White 

Dorothy Kelly Virginia Norden Beverly Bayne Ormi Hawley 

Lucille Lee Stewart Theda Bara Francis X. Bushman Edwin August 

Charles Richman Bessie Eyton Harold Lockwood Kitty Gordon 

Jewell Hunt J. Warren Kerrigan Mme. Petrova Mae Murray 

Alice Joyce Edna Mayo Valli Valli Blanche Sweet 

Peggy Hyland Helen Holmes Mrs. Sidney Drew Anita King 

Alice Brady Clara Kimball Young Sidney Drew Wallace Reid 

Subscription Prices: Magazine, 1 year $1.50; Classic, 1 year $1.75. Extra 
postage: Canada 30 cents, Foreign $1.00. 4 

THE M. P. PUBLISHING CO., * 

175 Duffield St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gentlemen: — 

Enclosed please find for which send me a year's subscription to the 

£ 3^823?" I and the 8 ° Portrait, mentioned above. 

Name * 

Address 



r 



IlllllUlIIIUIIIIIIIIllllllllilllllllllll 

When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



ilull 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




Various Headaches A Remedy for Pain 



"It is necessary in order to treat headaches properly to 
•understand the causes which produce the affection," says 
Dr. J. W. Ray of Blockton, Alabama. Continuing, he 
says: "Physicians cannot even begin the treatment of a 
disease without knowing what causes give rise to it, and 
we must remember that headache is to be treated accord- 
ing to the same rule. We must not only be particular to 
give a remedy intended to counteract the cause which 
produces the headache, but we must also give a remedy 
to relieve the pain until the cause of the trouble has been 
removed. To answer this purpose Anti-kamnia Tablets 
will be found a most convenient and satisfactory remedy. 
One tablet every one to three hours gives comfort and 
rest in most severe cases of headache, neuralgia and 
particularly the headaches of women. 

FOR SICK-HEADACHE 

If a patient is subject to regular attacks of sick-head- 
ache, he should take two A-K Tablets when he feels the 
least sign of an oncoming attack. These tablets are prompt 
in action, and can be depended upon to produce relief in 
a very few minutes. Such patients should always be 
instructed to keep their bowels open. 

Influenza or LaGrippe 

It is quite refreshing these days to read of a clearly 
defined treatment for Influenza or La Grippe. In an article 
in the "Lancet-Clinic," Dr. James Bell of New York City, 
says he is convinced that too much medication is both un- 
necessary and injurious. 

When called to a case of LaGrippe, the patient is usually 
seen when the fever is present, as the chill which occasion- 
ally ushers in the disease has generally passed away. Dr. 
Bell then orders that the bowels be opened freely with salts, 
citrate of magnesia or other laxative. For the high fever, 
severe headache, pain and general soreness, one Anti- 
kamnia Tablet every two hours is quickly followed by 
complete relief. 



"The efficiency of any drug," says Dr. C. P. Robbins, 
"is known to us by the results we obtain from its use. 
One of the principal symptoms of all diseases is pain, and 
this is what the patient most often applies to us for, i. e- 
something to relieve his pain. If we can arrest this prompt- 
ly, the patient is most liable to trust in us for the other 
remedies which will effect a permanent cure. One remedy 
which I have used largely in my practice is Anti-kamnia 
Tablets. Many and varied are their uses. I have put them 
to the test on many occasions, and have never been dis- 
appointed. I found them especially valuable for headaches 
of malarial origin, where quinine was being taken. They 
appear to prevent the bad after-effects of the quinine. 
Anti-kamnia Tablets are also excellent for the headaches 
from improper digestion; also for headaches of a neuralgic 
origin, and especially for women subject to pains at certain 
times. One or two Anti-kamnia Tablets every two or 
three hours gjve prompt relief." 

Acute Rheumatism 

In the hands of one observer we find that a certain drug 
has been used with the utmost satisfaction; others have 
found the same remedy to be a great disappointment. 
All physicians however agree that every method of treat- 
ment is aided by the administration of some remedy to 
relieve the pain and quiet the nervous system, and Dr. 
W. S. Schultze expresses the opinion of thousands of 
practitioners when he says that Anti-kamnia Tablets 
should be given preference over all other remedies for 
relief of the pain in all forms of rheumatism. They are 
also unsurpassed for headaches, neuralgia and all pain. 

Indigestion Dyspepsia 

Are you distressed after eating? Do you have nausea 
when riding in the cars, or on the train or boat? Take one 
A-K Tablet and get relief. 



When to Take Anti-Kamnia Tablets 

As a Pain Reliever— In headache, migraine, coryza, la grippe and its after-effects. 

As an Anodyne or Sedative— In indigestion, gastralgia, dyspepsia, hysteria, insomnia, 
car-sickness, sea-sickness, worry and sight-seer's fatigue. 

As an Antipyretic— In intermittent, puerperal and malarial fevers, bronchitis, pleurisy, etc. 

As an Anti- Neuralgic — In acute or chronic neuralgia, facial neuralgia, earache, tooth- 
ache and pains of sciatica. 

As an Anti-Rheumatic — For the pain in acute or chronic rheumatism and gout. 

All genuine Anti-kamnia Tablets bear the /K monogram. At all druggists 
in any quantity or in 10c and 25c packages. Ask for A-K Tablets and insist 
on getting them. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 




* OPPORTUNITY MARKET 



' CPi 



SOMETHINQ OF HfTEREST FOR S¥£&iY30£»Y 



AGENTS WANTED 


NEWS CORRESPONDENTS 


Agents— 500 Per Cent. Profit. Free Sample Gold and Silver Sign 
Letters for storefronts and office windows. Anyone can put 
on. Big demand everywhere. Write today for liberal offer to 
agents. Metallic Letter Co. , 405 N. CJark St., Chicago, U. S. A. 


EARN $25 WEEKLY, spare time, writing for news- 
papers, magazines. Experience unnecessary; details 
free. Press Syndicate, 457 St. Louis, Mo. 






WE START YOU IN BUSINESS, furnishing everything; 
men and women, $30 to $200 weekly operating our "New 
System Specialty Candy Factories" home or small room 
anywhere; no canvassing. Opportunity lifetime; booklet 
free. RAGSDALE CO., Drawer 91, East Orange, N. J. 


REAL ESTATE 


Mississippi 
IS HE CRAZY? The owner of a plantation in Mis- 
sissippi is giving away a few five-acre tracts. The 


AGENTS MAKE BIG MONEY. 

Fast office seller; fine profits; particulars and sample 
free. One Dip Pen Co., 10 Daily Record Bldg., Balti- 
more, Md. 


only condition is that figs be planted. The owner 
wants enough figs raised to supply a Canning Factory. 
You can secure five acres and an interest in the Fac- 
tory by writing Eubank Farms Company, 939 Key- 
stone, Pittsburgh, Pa. They will plant and care for 
your trees for $6 per month. Your profit should be 
$1,000 per year. Some .think this man is crazy for 
giving away such valuable land, but there may be 
method in his madness. 


AGENTS— 200 PER CENT PROEIT. Wonderful little 
article. Something new; sells like wildfire. Carry 
right in pocket. Write at once for free sample. E. M. 
Feltman, Sales Mgr., 9533 3rd St., Cincinnati, O. 




FREE SAMPLE WITH PARTICULARS. Nosplash 
Water Strainers. Easy seller. Returns big. Expe- 
rience unnecessary. E. E. UNION FILTER CO.. New 
York. 


FEMALE HELP WANTED 


FIVE BRIGHT, CAPABLE LADIES to travel, demon- 
strate and sell dealers. $25 to $50 per week. Rail- 
road fare paid. Goodrich Drug Company, Dept. 60, 
Omaha, Neb. 


MALE HELP WANTED 


LADIES TO SEW at home for a large Phila. firm ; good 
pay; steady work; no canvassing; send stamped en- 
velope for prices paid. UNIVERSAL CO., Dept. 45, 
Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 


THE WAY TO GET A GOV'T JOB is through the 
Washington Civil Service School. We prepare you and 
get yoa a position or we guarantee to refund your money. 
Write to Earl Hopkins, President, Washington, D. C, 
for Book FK 73, telling about 292296 Gov't Positions 
with lifetime employment, short hours, sure pay, regu- 
lar vacations. 


INTELLIGENT PERSON MAY EARN $10 to $25 

WEEKLY, during spare time at home, writing for 
newspapers; send for particulars. Press Syndicate, 
1411, Washington, D. C. 




LEARN TO BE A DETECTIVE — Travel over the world; 
earn large salary and expenses. Write today for free 
illustrated booklet. NATIONAL SCHOOL OF DE- 
TECTIVES, 506 Depew Bldg., Fifth Avenue, New York. 


BUSINESS CHANCES 


INVENT SOMETHING. It may bring wealth. Free 
book tells what to invent and how to obtain a patent 
through our Credit System. Waters & Co., Succeeded 
by Talbert & Parker, 4100 Warder Bldg., Washington, 
D. C. 


Thousands Men — Women Wanted as Government Clerks. 

$75 month. Spring examinations everywhere. Sample 
questions free. Franklin Institute, Dept. W-119, Roches- 
ter, N. Y. 


Government Positions Pay $900 to $1800 a Year. Write 
for 64-page book telling how to secure a position. 
Send no money — just write postal to Patterson Civil 
Service School, Box 1108. Rochester. N. Y. 


FREE FOR SIX MONTHS — My -special offer to intro- 
duce my magazine, "Investing for Profit." It is worth 
$10 a copy to any one who has not acquired sufficient 
money to provide necessities and comforts for self and 
loved ones. It shows how to become richer quickly 
and honestly. Investing for Profit is the only pro- 
gressive financial journal and has the largest circula- 
tion in America. It shows how $100 grows to $2,200; 
write now and I'll send it six months free. 
H. L. BARBER, 462, 
20 W. Jackson Boulevard, Chicago. 


HELP WANTED 


MEN AND WOMEN, 18 or over, wanted everywhere, 
for U. S. Government Life Jobs. Thousands 1917 va- 
cancies. $75.00 month. Steady work. Short hours. 
Rapid advancement. Common education sufficient. Write 
immediately for list of positions easily obtainable. 
Franklin Institute, Dept. W-119, Rochester, N. Y. 


$35 A WEEK TO $6,000 A YEAR 

Learn candy making. Qualify for traveling candy 


MAN OR WOMAN TO TRAVEL FOR OLD-ESTAB- 
LISHED FIRM. No canvassing; $1170 first year, pay- 
able weekly, pursuant to contract. Expenses advanced. 
T. G. Nichols, Philadelphia, Pa., Pepper Bldg. 


salesman; good position guaranteed. Own a candy 
store, or factory. We start you, help you succeed. 
Write for FREE booklet. We built a big candy busi- 
ness — give you our own experience. 

OTTER-SWAIN CORPORATION, 
Suite 117, 4759 Broadway, Chicago. 


' 


STORIES WANTED 


SONGWRITERS 


WANTED — Stories, articles, poems for new magazine. 
We pay on acceptance. Hand-written MSS. acceptable 
Submit MSS. to Cosmos Magazine, 1116 Stewart Bldg., 
Washington, D. C. 




Songwriters "Key to Success" Sent Free. This valuable 
booklet contains the real facts. We revise poems, com- 
pose and arrange music, secure copyright and facilitate 
free publication or outright sale. Start right. Send us 




FOR THE LAME 


some of your work to-day for free examination. 
Knickerbocker Studios, 126 Gaiety Building, N. Y. City. 


THE PERFECTION EXTENSION SHOE for any person 
with one short limb. No more unsightly cork soles, irons, 
etc., needed. Worn with ready-made shoes. Shipped on trial. 
Write for booklet. Henry 0. Lotz, 313 Third Ave., New York. 


SONG POEMS WANTED— Splendid offer. Strictly le- 
gitimate. Write for National Song, Music & Sales ser- 
vice booklet. Valuable instructive facts for writers. 
It's free. Brennen, Suite 66, 1431 Broadway, New York. 



When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION' PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



J5he OPPORTUNITY MARKET 



PATENTS 



Patents Secured or Fee Returned. Actual search free. 
Send sketch. 1917 Edition 90-page patent book free. 
My free sales service gets full value. George P. 
Kimmel, 262 Barrister Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

Patents. Write for List of Patent Buyers who wish to 
purchase patents and What to Invent with List Inven- 
tions Wanted; .$1,000,000 in prizes offered for inventions. 
Send sketch for free opinion of patentability. Four 
Guide books sent free upon request. Patents advertised 
Free. We assist inventors to sell their inventions. 
Victor J. Evans & Co., 833 Ninth, Washington, D. C. 

Patent Your Ideas — $9,000 offered for certain inven- 
tions. Books, "How to Obtain a Patent" and "What 
to Invent," sent free. Send rough sketch for free 
report as to patentability. Manufacturers constantly 
writing us for patents we have obtained. We advertise 
your patent for sale at our expense. Established 20 
years. Address, Chandlee & Chandlee, patent attor- 
neys, 989 F St., Washington, D. C. 

PATENTS — Send Sketch. Free Search and Certificate 
of Patentability. Free Book, "How to Obtain a Patent 
and What to Invent." Patents secured through Credit 
System. Talbert & Parker, Patent Lawyers, 4100 
Warder Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

PATENTS THAT PROTECT AND PAY. Books and 
advice Free. Highest references. Best results. Prompt- 
ness assured. WATSON E. COLEMAN, 624 F Street, 
Washington. I). C. 

Ideas Wanted — Manufacturers are writing for patents 
procured through me. Four books with list hundreds 
of inventions wanted sent free. I help you market 
vour invention. Advice free. R. B. Owen, 121 Owen 
Bldg., Washington, D. C. 



PHOTOPLAYS 



Let FS Sell Your Photoplays. Thorough submission 
brings results. We send duplicate copies of your 
scenario to every film company at once. No expense 
unless deal made. Send us your photoplays. National 
Photoplay Sales Co., Box 422, Des Moines, la. 

See Here! We want your ideas for Photoplays and 
stories! Submit them in any form. We'll criticise 
them Free and sell on commission. Producers pay 
big prices. Get details now. Manuscript Sales Co., 
95 Main, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

WRITE FOR FREE COPY "Hints to Writers of Pho- 
toplays, Short Stories, Poems." Also catalog of best 
books for writers. Atlas Pub. Co., 95 Atlas Bldg., 
Cincinnati, O. 

Wanted — Your ideas for Photoplays, Stories, Etc.! We 
will accept them in any form — fully correct — then sell 
on Commission. Big Rewards! Make money. Get free 
details now! Writer's Service, 2 Main, Auburn, N. Y. 

STORIES AND PHOTOPLAY IDEAS WANTED BY 

48 COMPANIES; big pay. Details Free to beginners. 

PRODUCERS LEAGUE, 

441, St. Louis. 

A New and Fncrowded Field — Writing the Commercial 
Movie. National advertisers, retailers, fraternal or- 
ganizations, etc., need specialists in writing the adver- 
tising movie. "The Commercial Movie: Its Opportuni- 
ties," mailed on request. Ernest A. Bench, 326 Decatur 
Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Write Photoplays in Spare Time and Earn Money. 

Try it; big prices paid; constant demand; no corre- 
spondence course; details free. GIESE CO., 299 White- 
man St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Send Me Your Idea for a Photoplay. Submit in any 
form. I will put your idea in correct photoplay form, 
typewrite and help you sell. Send idea or write for de- 
tails. H. L. Hursb, 123 S. Third St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



MOVING PICTURE BUSINESS 



$3.5.00 PROFIT NIGHTLY. SMALL CAPITAL 

starts you. No experience needed. Our machines are 
used and endorsed by Government institutions. Catalog 
Free. Atlas Moving Picture Co., Dept. 91-525, So. 
Dearborn St., Chicago. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING PLANTS 



ELECTRIC Theatre, Home, Farm & Store Light Plants: 
Fans; Power Motors; Lights; Dynamos; Engines; 
Belts; Bells; Books; Storage & Medical Batteries; 
Rectifiers; Telephones; Bicycle, Carriage, Fishing & 
Flash Lights; Massage, Ozone & M. P. Machines. 
Motion Picture Theatre Complete Equipments for 
Permanent and Traveling SPIOWS. Write Now. 
Catalog 3 cts. OHIO ELECTRIC WORKS. Cleveland. O. 



WEDDING INVITATIONS 



Wedding Invitations, Announcements, etc.. 100 in Script 
lettering, including inside and outside envelopes. $2.75; 
100 Visiting Cards, 75 cents. Write for Samples. 
31. Ott Engraving Co., 1005 Chestnut St., Phila., Pa. 



COINS, STAMPS, ETC. 



$$— OLD COINS WANTED— $$—$4.25 each paid for 
U. S. Flying Eagle Cents dated 1S56. $2 to 3600 paid 
for hundreds of oid coins dated before 1S95. Send TEN 
cents at once for New Illustrated Coin Value Book, 
4x7. Get posted — it may mean your good fortune. 
C. F. CLARKE & CO., Coin Dealers, Box 99, Le Roy. N.Y. 

Old Coins and Stamps of All Kinds. From SI. 00 to 
$1,000.00 cash paid for some to 1912. Keep all old 
money and stamps. Send 4c. Get Large Illustrated Coin 
and Stamp Circular. You have nothing to lose. Send 
now. Numismatic Bank, Dept. 48, Fort Worth, Texas. 



POULTRY 



POFLTRY PAPER, 44-124 page periodical, up to date, 
tells all you want to know about care and manage- 
ment of poultry, for pleasure or profit; four months for 
10 cents. Poultry Advocate, Dept. 232, Syracuse. N. Y. 



GAMES AND ENTERTAINMENTS 



PLAYS, Vaudeville Sketches, Monologues, Dialogues, 
Speakers, Minstrel Material, Jokes, Recitations, Tab- 
leaux, Drills, Entertainments. Make Up Goods. Large 
Catalog Free. T. S. Denison & Co., Dept. 62, Chicago. 



PHOTOPLAY TEXT BOOKS 



How to Write a Photoplay, by C. G. Winkopp, 134 2 
Prospect Ave., Bronx, N. Y. C. Price, 25 cents. Con- 
tains model scenario, "Where to Sell," "How to Build 
Plots," "Where to Get Plots." 

"SCENARIO TECHNIC," 10c coin. Original 50-scene 
photoplay, writing and selling instructions, list of buy- 
ers. Manuscripts typed. 5c per 100 words, with carbon. 
Doty Co., Bliss Bldg., R. 55, Washington, I). C. 



TYPEWRITERS 



TYPEWRITERS, all makes, factory rebuilt by famous 
"Young Process." As good as new, look like new, 
wear like now. guaranteed like new. Our big business 
permits lowest cash prices, $10 and up. Also, machines 
rented — or sold on time. No matter what your needs 
are we can best serve you. Write and see — now. 
Young Typewriter Company. Dept. 41, Chicago. 



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MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 





B 1 



: A "CAMERA MAKI' 

and Earn $40 to $100 Weekly 11 



"The Camera Man" is one of the best paid 
men in the "Movie'' business, actors included. 
He travels all over the world at the company's 
expense. Complete Course in 1 to 3 months. 
Write for Catalog M 

New York Institute of Photography 

Photography taught in all its branches 
141 Weft 36th St., New York. E. BRUNEL, Director 




YOU CAN BE A NURSE 

Scholarships in Resident Two Year 
Course. Low rates for home training in 

The Hospital Extension Course 

Instruction under physicians and graduate 

\ nurses. 20 years' experience. Send for free 

books. Philadelphia School for Nurses 

2247 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



MUSIC LESSONS FREE 




Doo can fttcxol TTUwa* fcJKct^quu&Cy 
At Your Home. Write today for our booklet. It tells 
bow to learn to play Piano, Organ, Violin, Mandolin, 
Guitar, Banjo, etc. Beginners or advanced pupils. 

AMERICAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 69 Lakeside Bldg..Chicaso 




LEARN RAGTIME 



Let me teach you Rag-Time Piano Playing by Mail. 
You learn easily— in just a few lessons, at home. 
My system is so simple you'll play a real ragtime ' 
piece at your 5th lesson. Whether you can play now, 
or not, 1 11 teach you to play anything in happy 
ragtime. "Money Back Guarantee." Write at 
once for special low terms and testimonials. 

AXEL CHRISTENSEN, "Czar of Ragtime," 
20 East Jackson Blvd., Dept. CI 3, Chicago. Ill, 



CARTOONING, COMIC 
J1*ART and CARICATURE 

1n5Z^>!J^^™ There is big money in the above for 
1 ^V^y*^' y° u ' I w ^l show you how. Send 6c in 

P ■ ^yr m t stamps today for my prospectus explaining 
method and terms. Write your name plainly. 
ZIM ART SCHOOL, Sept. Y, Hoiseheads, IV. *. 



E A BANKER 

Prepare by mail for this high profession, in which there are great 



opportunities. Six months' term. Diploma awarded. Sendforfree 
book, "How to Become a Banker. ,T EDGAR G. ALCORN. Pres, 

AMERICAN SCHOOL OF BANKING 
453 East State Street. COLUMBUS, OHIO 




d» ACTING 



DRAMATIC 
SCHOOLS 







DRAMA- ORATORY- OPERA*™ SINGING 

STAGE*™ CLASSIC I1ANCING ""MUSICAL COMEDY 

ALSO MOTION PICTURE ACTING 

Courses lormhig [20th year]. Beginners and Advanced 
students accepted. Agents and Managers supplied. [Pro- 
ducing and Booking.] Write for information [mention 
study desired] and Illustrated Catalogue, how thousands 
of celebrated Actors and Actresses [late graduates] suc- 
ceeded, addressing 

Secretary of Alviene Schools. Suite 3, 57th St. 8 B'dway, Entrance 225 W. 57th St.. N. Y. 

Comics, Cartoons, Commer- 
cial, Newspaper ana Magazine 
Illustrating. Pastel and Cray- 
on Portraits. 
Earn «25 to $200 a week. 

By our simple method your talent is 
Quickly developed without interfering 
with present work. By Mail or Local Classes. Small sums you now fritter 
away pay your tuition. Write for terms, list of successful pupils and instruction 
method FREE. ASSOCIATED ART STUDIOS. 2223 Flatiren BJdg.,Kew York 



LEARN RIGHT AT HOME BY MAIL 

DRAWING-PAINTING 

Be a Cartoonist. Newspaper, Magazine, or Commercial 
Illustrator; paint in Water Colors or Oil. Le^t us develop 
jour talent. Free Scholarship Award. Your name and 
address brings you full particulars by return mail and 
our illustrated Art Annual Free. 
FINE ARTS INSTITUTE, Studio 614. - OMAHA. NEB. 



SHORT-STORY WRITING 

A course of forty lessons in the history, form, structure and 

writing of the Short-Story taught by l>r. J. Berg Esenwein, for 

years Editor of Lippincott's. 250-p. catalog free. Please address 

The Home Correspondence School 

Br. Esenwein Dept. HI. Springfield, Mass. 



COPY THIS SKETCH 

and let me see what you can do with it. Illustrators 
and cartoonists earn from $20 to $125 a week or r 
more. My practical system of personal individual x\ 
lessons by mail will develop your talent. Fifteen ( jr 
years' successful work for newspapers and maga- 
zines qualifies me to teach you. 

Send me your sketch of President Wilson with 6c 
in stamps and I will send you a test lesson plate, also 
collection of drawings showing possibilities for YOU. 

THE LANDON SCHOOL ° nd 'cSKSSSSI 

1402 Schofield Building, Cleveland, O. 



VETERINARY COURSE AT HOME 

Taught in simplest English during spare 
time. Diploma granted. Cost within reach 
of all. Satisfaction guaranteed. Have been 
teaching by correspondence twenty years. 
Graduates assisted in many ways. Every 
person interested in stock should take it. 
Write for catalogue and full particulars 

FREE 

London Vet. Correspondence 
School 
Dept. 117, London, Ontario, Can. 





When answering advertisements kindly mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



PUZZLES FOR PUZZLERS 

Here are two new puzzles for those 
of our readers who like to discover 
the names of their favorites, no 
matter how deeply hidden they may be. 
Since part of the fun of a puzzle is the 
reward of the solution, we offer three 
prizes for the best and most artistic 
answers to both puzzles. For the first 
correct and most artistic set of answers 
we will give five dollars ; for the second 
best, two dollars ; and for the third, a 
subscription to either the Motion Pic- 
ture Magazine or Motion Picture 
Classic. Address all answers to the j 
Puzzle Editor, Motion Picture Maga- i 
zixe, 175 Duffield St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Xo questions will" be answered about 
the puzzles. Contest closes April 30, 
1917. 

Hidden Motion Picture Artists 

Their home is now on the bay near 

Bayonne. 
Most people enjoy celebrity and reward. 
To keep rice whole in cooking have the 

fire burn slowly. 
Whoever heard of a rich urchin? 
The question came up for debate, and 

Eva let bashful Leroy speak on her 

side. 
By profession he is an oculist, or eye 

doctor, but the shop belongs to him. 
They always pay new money to their 

employees. 

Behead Your Favorite Players and Win a Prize 

Behead a Motion Picture actress and find 

a bird ; behead again and find a vessel. 
Behead a Motion Picture actress and find 

a girl's name. 
Behead a Motion Picture actress and find 

entire. 
Behead a Motion Picture actress and find 

a beverage. ' 
Behead a Motion Picture actress and find 

a grain ; again and find frost. 
Behead a Motion Picture actress and find 

the present time. 
Behead a Motion Picture actress and find 

receptacles. 
Behead a Motion Picture actor and find 

skill. 



You May Now Us 

this valuable art. Others are usinj? Licbtenlag Paraxon as a daily 
convenience. Executives and business men lind it very Useful. 
Because of its remarkable simplicity you can learn the entire 

LICHTENTAG PARAGON 



SHORTHAND 



in your own home, during the 
eveniiiKs of one week. Speed 
comes with use or prac- 
tice. Wondeviully easy to read, 
Paragon Writers are stenog- 
raphers in service of U. S. Gov. 
and offices corporations, also in 
court reporting. System already 
adopted by number of cities ior 

High Schools. 

Write for lull 

proof. 



•m 



DAYS 



What Others Say: 
"The stud) of Paragon is a fasci- 
nating pastime." 

"1 was able to use It in malcin? my 
private memoranda though Blowly 
even before the end of the week." 
"So simple and legible that in a 
week I could read all the short- 
hand matter, even before stalling 
speed practice." 

"By practice I have already devel- 
oped a speed of 175 words a min- 
ute." 

"The highest I was able to reach, 

on a four minutes dictation of new 

matter, was 260 words a minute." 

THE PARAGON INSTITUTE 

296 Coliseum St., New Orl., La. 



TYPEWRITERS 



SAVE FROM 
$25 to $75 




Up-to-date machines of standard 
makes — Remingtons, etc., thoroughly- 
rebuilt, trademarked and guaranteed 
the same as new. We operate the 
largest rebuilt typewriter factories in the world. 
Efficient service through Branch Stores in leading 
cities insures satisfaction. Send for catalogue. 

American Writing Machine Co., Inc., 339 Broadway, N. Y. 

Print Your Own 
Cards, Handbills, 

Programs, Tickets, Circulars, Etc., 

With an Excelsior Press. Increases your 
receipts, cuts your expenses. Easy to 
use, printed rules sent. Boy can do good 
work. Small outlay, pays for itself in a 
short time. Will last for years. Write 
factory TO-DAY for catalogue of presses, 
type, outfit, samples. It will pay you. 
THE PRESS CO. D-44, Meriden, Conn. 




P 

J/^ Chicagi 



ATENTI 

Mason, Fenwiek & Lawrence, oldest U. s. firm 

having Main Office at Washington, D. C. Also New York and 
Chicago. Established 1861. Best Reference's. ^Trade-Marks Registered. 



BOOKLET AND INFORMATION FREE. 




Write for this valuable booklet which contains the REAL FACTS . We revise 
poems, compose and arrange music, secure copyright and facilitate free pub- 
lication or outright sale. Start right with reliable concern offering a legitimate 
proposition. Send us some of your work to-day for FREE examination. 

KNICKERBOCKER STUDIOS, 146 <jj^argS Bld » 




WANTED— Railway Mail Clerks 

COMMENCE $75 MONTH INCREASE TO $150 MONTH 

Common education/ Franklin Institute 

Sufficient. / Dept.W-143, Rochester, N.Y. 

Sure pay. 
Life job. 



A Sirs: Send me without charge, 

-O sample Railway Mai] Clerk Examl- 
S* nation questions: list of other govern- 
ed ment jobs now easily obtainable and 
rull Unnec- ^ free book describing them. 

essary. 



jL 



Name. 
Address. 



10 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



mil nullum 



$50 for a Good Story 

II $25forAnother Not Quite SoGoodli 

$10 for the Next Best 

I| And $5 Each for the Next Ten II 

|1 Have you a story to tell? Have you a story || 

11 about yourself, or perhaps your family, or ances- \\ 

\\ tors, or friends, or acquaintances? Surely you f| 

ll have, for there are few men or women in this || 

11 world who have not some dramatic story to tell. || 

II Think of some episode in your own life, in the || 

II life of another, or, if you possess the gift of || 

II imagination, write a story that is purely imagina- il 

II tive, but at the same time is TRUE TO LIFE, || 

II and send it in to us, to compete for one of the || 

II prizes set forth above. There is no entrance fee || 

If and anybody m;iy compete. No manuscript will || 

II be returned unless it is accompanied with a | = 

ll stamped, addressed envelope. The scripts that win \\ 

1| prizes will become our property. 

\\ We Demand Only One Condition: || 

I| Limit Your Story to Five Hundred Words jj 

ll Millions attend the Motion Picture theaters 1 = 

ll nightly. To satisfy the ever-increasing demands || 

11 of these millions of movie fans, the great pro- || 

ll ducing companies must have stories. Several of || 

11 these film corporations, who are exceedingly || 

|| anxious to please the movie patrons, have acknowl- || 

ll edged to us that they need stronger plots. We || 

|| want to encourage the art of plot writing. || 

|| Absolutely No Technical Skill Needed. II 

11 All the big studios now employ writers who H 

11 work out the stories into scenes, and put them in p| 

11 proper shape for the screen. But there is a great \\ 

11 dearth oi stories. The companies must have new || 

H plots, new ideas, new incidents, and they are || 

11 obliged to depend in a great measure upon the || 

11 public. Moreover, the studios are now willing to || 

II pay big prices for plots alone. The price is con- || 

|| stantly rising, and, at the present time, 

II From $50 to $1,000 is Being Paid II 
For Plots Alone 

ll Your story may be incomplete — lack dramatic H 

1 1 interest, suspense, climax, surprise, novelty, char- || 

|| acterization or any of the other elements that go || 

|| to make up a salable dramatic story. If you think || 

|| so you may submit it to us for criticism. For a =1 

|| fee of $1.00 we shall be happy to point out to 11 

|| you the defects in your work, indicating why || 

11 certain things should not be done, and suggesting |1 

|| others that will materially improve your script. H 

11 In other words, we shall be glad to collaborate 11 

II with you in turning out a strong and appealing II 

11 tale. This work will be done only by well-known || 

11 scenario writers, who have had studio experience, || 

1 1 -including the editors of the Motion Picture || 

= 1 Magazine and Classic. H 

11 In addition to an honest, upbuilding criticism, |! 

11 we will mail you a list of producing companies, to || 

|| whom you can submit your story in case you do || 

|= not wish, to enter it in this contest. You may \l 

\l enter your story whether or not it has been ll 

= | criticized, but under no conditions will we answer || 

= = questions regarding the merits of stories. Thus ii 

ll we shall be treating all writers alike. CRITICISM 11 

11 OF YOUR STORY IS ENTIRELY OPTIONAL 11 

|| WITH YOURSELF. || 

H THE CONTEST CLOSES ON MARCH 31, 1917. \\ 

11 THE SCENARIO SERVICE BUREAU II 

ll 175 Duffield Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. City \\ 



PHOTOPLAY REVIEWS 

"The Secret of the Swamp" (Bluebird).— 
A slumberous, Southern, bucolic photoplay, 
not only guilty of a tame plot, but criminally 
uninteresting. Nevertheless, the players, 
including buxom Myrtle Gonzalez and Val 
Paul, are well chosen, and the locations are 
atmospherically well chosen. H. S. N. 

"The Man of Mystery" (Greater Vita- 
graph). — Wherein Sothern — or Mr. E. H. 
Sothern, if you will — is indeed great. Here 
is a play for discriminating audiences, "The 
Man of Mystery" is an unloved personage of 
vast intellect but hideous exterior. During 
a voyage he is caught in a Vesuvian erup- 
tion and accounted dead. He recovers, how- 
ever, rendered perfect in form from the heat. 
The way he returns home, and under an as- 
sumed name regains his old position and the 
love of his wife, is a dramatic bit of unflag- 
ging wonder. In this picture Mr. Sothern 
is "The Great Lover." Charlotte Ives, his 
leading woman, is an exquisite, ideal type 
of womanhood. H. S. N. 

"Patria" (International). — This new won- 
der-serial holds forth a great promise. So 
far, the story, concerning the plotting of 
Japanese and Mexican agents against the 
last of the Channings, owners of large 
munition plants, is opportune, thrilling, and, 
most important of all, believable. The set- 
tings are attractive. Mrs. Vernon Castle, the 
much-heralded star, reminds us painfully of 
a dressmaker's manikin; nevertheless, per- 
sonality is hers, and when she has anything 
definite to do, she does it with vim and vigor. 
It is only in the subtle moments that she is 
somewhat self-conscious. The supporting 
cast, including Warner Oland, George Ma- 
jeroni and Milton Sills, is excellent. 

H. S. N. 

"A Lass of the Lumberlands" (Signal). — - 
Another serial — not shredded wheat, but 
Helen Holmes. In the beginning you will 
say, "Just like all her others," but in the end 
you'll sit up and take notice. She is still our 
"Hazardous Helen." H. S. N. 

"The Happiness of Three Women" (Mo- 
rosco). — Here is a photoplay that merits un- 
stinted praise because of its splendid direc- 
tion. Circumstantial evidence brings un- 
happiness to three women, but, upon being 
cleared away, restores the man of her heart 
to each of the three. The photography is 
little short of marvelous, different times of 
day being represented by different shading. 
A distinct achievement. Myrtle Stedman 
and House Peters are the head-liners. 

H. S. N. 

"Paula Blackton's Country Life Stories" 
(Vitagraph). — Five two-reel plays, named 
"The Little Strategist," "Satin and Calico," 
"The Collie Market," "A Spring Idyl" and 
"The Fairy Godfather," featuring Paula 
Blackton, her clever children, Violet and 
Charles, her sister, Jewell Hunt, and all of 
the Blackton animals on the BlaoMon estate 
at Oyster Bay. Something new. They are 
dainty, picturesque, beautiful and sparkling 



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with gentle humor, yet slight of plot, which 
proves that high-class art does not require 
sensationalism and spectacular extravagance 
to assist it. Mrs. Blackton has a style all 
her own, and most of the screen stars can 
learn much from a study of the unique and 
original way in which she registers the emo- 
tions. Her support is of high order, includ- 
ing Charles Kent, Marc MacDermott, Charles 
Richman, Arthur Cozine, James Morrison 
and Gordon Gray. Commodore J. Stuart 
Blackton personally directed these pictures, 
and they are carefully and artistically done 
in every detail. In fact, these pictures are 
so unique that they can almost be said to be 
epoch-making. J. 

"Broken Chains" (World). — A Southern 
setting, a young man falsely accused and 
convicted of murder, queer Southern politics 
and superstitious negroes make this some- 
what out of the ordinary and intensely inter- 
esting. Ethel Clayton is a star who grows 
more attractive with every release. 

H. S. N. 

"The Great Secret" (Metro).— The Bush- 
man-Bayne serial. Unfortunately based on 
improbabilities and trick thrillers. There is 
an air of cheapness to the production. We 
are painfully aware that the rooms are wall- 
board scenery. Francis Bushman himself is 
in a very happy and pleasing mood. 

H. S. N. 

"Luke's Trolley Troubles" (Pathe). — A 
street-car full of silliness, but you will laugh, 
just the same. H. S. N. 

"The Weaker Sex" (Ince-Triangle). — A 
photoplay from the pen of Alice C. Brown. 
Noteworthy for two reasons. In it Dorothy 
Dalton proves herself an actress capable of 
big things. Here is a girl who is not a one- 
part actress. On the other hand, the play 
itself has an important thought back of it. 
That is, that women are capable mentally 
of excelling men at their own business — in 
this case, law. The cast includes such 
notables as Charles Ray, Louise Glaum and 
Robert McKim. H. S. N. 

"The Diary of a Puppy" (Vitagraph). — 
Merely a reel of puppy pictures, but one of 
the funniest and most interesting that I have 
seen for many a moon. J. 

"Easy Street" (Mutual). — If you ever 
doubted Charlie Chaplin's ability as a come- 
dian, see "Easy Street" and be reformed. 
Here he is incomparable, a master of panto- 
mime, with a laugh in every gesture. He is 
beautifully aided by Edna Purviance, as 
usual. H. S. N. 

"The Princess of Patches" (Selig). — An 
interestingly produced photoplay from the 
Mark Twain story. The real heiress to a 
huge cotton plantation is stolen when a 
baby, and the many difficulties she has to 
surmount before she learns and establishes 
her identity constitute quite a melodrama. 
Vivian Reed is the star, but the little girl 
who takes the part of "Patches" as a child, 
and whose name is given simply as Violet, 
is unusually lovely to look upon. H. S. N. 

"The Iced Bullet" (Ince-Triangle). — A 



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When a Man's a Man. Publisher's 
price, $1.35. My price, 90c. 

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Famous Pictures. $6.00-$1.45. 

Encyclopedia of Quotations. Pub. 
price, $2.50. My price, 89c. 

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and Deeds, $1.50-85c. 

Famous Orators, $2. 50- -95c. 

Law Without Lawyers. Pub. price, 
$2.00. My price, 45c. 

Shakespeare, 24 vols., 24mo. Leath- 
er, $2.65. 



Woodrow Wilson. 50c. 
Key to the Bible. $3.75-98c. 
Library of Wit & Humor, $1.50-52c. 
Huckleberry Finn and Other Mark 

Twain Books, $1.75-$1.23. 
Brann: The Iconoclast. 2 vols. $2.25. 
History of the World, 3 vols. Pub. 

price, $12.00. My price, $2.95. 
Memory: How to Develop, 85c. 
Century Book of Health. Pub. 

price, $5.50. Mv price, $1.50. 
New Americanized Encyclopedia, 15 

vols., 3-4 Leather. Pub. price, 

$75.00. My price, $14.75. 
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia. 

12 vols., 3-4 Leather. Pub. price, 

$120.00. My price, $39.50. 



Here are De Luxe Sets, Morocco bound, complete works, many of them at 
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man who insists upon his dollar's worth—the man who watches his pennies 
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book new and fresh, and guaran eed to please you— you to be the judge. 
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keen satire on the persistency of would-be 
photoplay writers, by C. Gardner Sullivan. 
And, if looked at from the other point of 
view, an equally keen satire on the way 
genius is kept locked outside the studio 
gates. William Desmond is pleasing in the 
lead. H. S. N. 

"A Girl Like That" (Famous Players).— 
The sweet simplicity of this picture will 
warm your heart. It is a story of plain 
country folk, whose faith and love reform 
the daughter of a crook. Owen Moore, as the 
big-hearted, awkward bank cashier, gives us 
a fine characterization, a bit of acting that 
is great in its simplicity, in its consistency. 
Irene Fenwick is attractive as the girl. 

H. S. N. 

"The Courage of Silence" (Vitagraph). — 
Here is a plot that does not resort to what 
is often the bane of the screen — a physical 
climax. No sinking steamers, burning 
bridges, nor railroad smash-ups are needed 
to unfold the crises in the life of Bradley, as 
portrayed by Harry Morey, and Mercedes, as 
portrayed by Alice Joyce. It's the tale of a 
man who conquers his own worst enemy, 
himself, and a woman "who pays" by a fine 
bit of self-sacrifice. With natural emotions, 
natural climaxes and natural acting, the 
screen is progressing, and "The Courage of 
Silence" is a standard-bearer of the newer 
and infinitely better art. E. M. L. 

"The Female of the Species" (Ince-Tri- 
angle). — One of the month's most impressive 
five-reelers, because of its magnificent pro- 
duction, appealing cast and splendid pho- 
tography. Dorothy Dalton is splendidly, 
sensuously beautiful as a worldly w T ise ar- 
tiste who tries by hook or crook to keep the 
love of a man who, in turn, loves only a 
sweet, innocently simple girl impersonated 
by Enid Markey. The last flicker leaves one 
with a sad feeling for the losing woman, 
perhaps a subtle proof of the pudding — in 
other words, its realistic appeal. H. S. N. 

"His Wife's Relations" (Nestor). — Instead 
of the perennial mother-in-law joke, here is 
a whole family of bothersome "in-laws," with 
Eddie Lyons and Edith Roberts as the perse- 
cuted newly-weds. A good, big laugh from 
A to Z. H. S. N. 

"North and South" (Florence Rose-Pathe). 
— A novelty. The use of a clever little story 
for the purpose of exhibiting fascinating 
fashions. H. S. N. 

"The Man Who Forgot" (World).— The 
splendid acting of Robert Warwick, the 
forcefulness of Gerda Holmes' impersona- 
tion, the prettiness of Doris Kenyon and 
really wonderful Congressional scenes lure us 
into forgetting how flimsy is the foundation 
— dn other words, the plot. H. S.'N. 

"War Brides" (Selznick). — This is Marion 
Craig Wentworth's vaudeville sketch made 
into a lengthy photodrama. There is a 
wealth of painstaking detail, good acting, 
splendid trench and pastoral scenes. Olga 
Nazimova, the star, possesses a wild, sinu- 
ous grace together with a depth of feeling 
that is as apparent on the screen as on the 
stage. In its way, a masterly production, 
but it seems to me that its preachment 



MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE 



13 



would have been more effective were the 
action snappier, more rapid-firing. 

H. S. N. 

"House Built Upon Sand" (Griffith-Tri- 
angle). — A luxury-loving girl's husband ab- 
ducts her and forces her to live the simple 
life. Here is a decidedly life-like vehicle in 
which to display the bird-like charms of 
Lillian Gish. H. S. N. 

"On Dangerous Ground" (World). — Gail 
Kane and Carlyle Blackwell in a story of 
the present war. The girl is a French spy, 
who persuades an American doctor to help 
her thru the German lines. The situations 
are dramatic, well acted and at times thrill- 
ing. H. S. N. 

"The White Raven" (Metro).— Ethel Bar- 
ryniore is starred in this five-reel photoplay. 
The story is one of the best that has ever 
come from the Metro studio. A dance-hall 
girl in an Alaskan dance-hall, known as 
"Nightingale Nan," the "White Raven," real- 
izes that her voice is too good to be wasted 
in the wilds. She offers herself to the gam- 
bler drawing the best poker-hand. "The 
Stranger" enters the game and wins the girl 
with a pair of deuces. Frightened, she 
pleads to be released from the agreement. 
He does so, stipulating that, at the moment 
of her greatest triumph, he will send for her, 
and she must heed. The climax is well 
worked out, the whole play a most enjoyable 
one. The leading man is especially good. 

R. B. C. 

"Her Obsession" (Metro). — One of the fun- 
niest comedies the Drews have done in a 
long time. It will appeal particularly to 
those who have an idea that they are too 
"stout" and that they'd like to "reduce." 
Mrs. Marsh (played, of course, by Mrs. 
Drew) is continually asking her husband, 
"Am I as fat as she is?" Henry (Mr. Drew) 
adopts a scheme to make her believe she is 
growing thin, and the whole story works up 
to a very amusing climax. R. B. C. 

"The Victim" (Fox). — One of the worst 
pictures that the bizarre Valeska ha^ ever 
done. The story is weak and melodramatic, 
with everything working out in the most 
approved manner of aN scenario-writers'. 
One can hear the clink as tme piece of the 
story fits into another. Miss Quratt wears 
some weird and elaborate gowns, and occa- 
sionally looks very beautiful. But the sup- 
port is inadequate; Claire Whitney rooks 
sweet and does nothingrelse. It's a pity that 
such pictures have to be released. R. B. C. 

"The Bride of Hate" (Triangle).— Frank 
Keenans name, now, is sufficient to draw a 
packed house at any time, but in this last 
play he has outdone himself. The story is 
a weird but intensely interesting one, of a 
Southern colonel who, to avenge a wrong 
done him in his youth, adopts a child with 
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captivating. Jerome Story is an acceptable 
hero, but Frank Keenan dominates the entire 
five reels. R. B. C. 

"The Butterfly Girl" (Pollard Pictures).— 
This picture is chiefly acceptable because it 
brings back to us lovely Margarita Fischer, 
more lovely than ever. Miss Fischer, in the 
white-and-silver costume of the Butterfly 
Girl, is very winning. Little Georgia French 
makes a very lovable little sister. The whole 
production is well handled, the story accept- 
able and the support good. R. B. C. 

"Cave Man's Buff" (Metro).— The Drews 
again, in a very funny little comedy all about 
a bachelor who was too bashful to propose, 
of a girl who didn't mind helping him to 
propose, and his susceptible, impressionable 
boss, who takes lessons in the art of being a 
"cave man" from the bachelor. A clean, 
amusing little comedy. R. B. C. 

"Living Book of Nature" (Ditmars). — One 
doesn't realize the sagacity and cleverness of 
animals until revealed in some such man- 
ner. The reel has to do with the beaver and 
his preparations for the coming winter. He 
is shown busily- carrying logs and building 
his winter home, bringing food to it, sub- 
merging tender branches and boughs, so that 
when winter comes and the lake freezes over 
he will be snugly housed, with plenty of 
food. Then the lake is shown, ice-locked, 
with just a slight rise where the warm 
home of the beaver is, far below the surface 
of the frozen lake. A very interesting 
picture. R. B. C. 

"The Years of the Locust" (Lasky).— 
With all due respect (and some that, per- 
haps, isn't due yet) to Miss Ward, feminine 
fans are going to like this latest Fannie 
Ward picture, because it gives the fair star 
another opportunity to wear stunning gowns, 
and to look like the smartly gowned, clever 
actress who was, for five years, judged the 
best-dressed actress in London. Jack Dean 
is the hero, and Walter Long makes a prop- 
erly devilish and wicked villain. That seems 
to be Walter's specialty. The support is 
very good and the story acceptable. 

R. B. C. 

PATTER FROM THE PACIFIC 

By DICK MELBOURNE 

^Gail Kane has arrived out on the Coast, 
and gone to Santa Barbara, where she will 
work at the American studios under Rollin 
S. Sturgeon. 

Wallace Reid is keeping his auto business 
up to schedule. He has just traded in his 
"Roamer" for a McFarlan. It seems to be 
Wally's ambition to own every car on the 
market. The only other actor to come any- 
where near his standard is Charlie Ray, who 
has just traded in his boat for a red Mercer. 

Little Mary Sunshine has left Balboa and 
gone to New York. Henry King will direct 
and play with Kathleen Clifford. 

Margaret Illington is working at the Lasky 
studios under the direction of Frank Reicher, 
making "The Inner Shrine." 



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Bessie Love is enjoying herself immensely 
at the Fine Arts studio. She has mastered 
the art of playing the ukelele, and whenever 
she is waiting between scenes she amuses 
the rest of the bunch with her playing and 
singing. Bessie has a mighty sweet voice, 
too. 

William Stowell is a strong favorite out at 
the Universal. He went out there to work 
in several features, after leaving the Ameri- 
can Company. The Universal liked his work 
so well that they refused to let Bill get away 
until he had signed a contract with them. 

William D. Taylor took his star, Dustin 
Farnum, and supporting company, up to 
Truckee recently for some snow-scenes. Dus- 
tin offered a lot of prizes for skiing, skating 
and other sports, but did not have to give 
them when the contests were all over — he 
won them all himself! 

Tom Ince tells us that he is being flooded 
with stories these days for Bill Hart and 
Charles Ray. He declares that all the ama- 
teur and professional writers seem to choose 
these two stars to build a story around. 
Dorothy Dalton is also coming in for quite 
a shower of scenarios. 

Myrtle Stedman has been loaned to the 
Lasky Company by Morosco, and is being 
co-starred in a photoplay with Wallace Reid. 

Eddie Lyons and Lee Moran have "been 
feeling very tired in the mornings lately. 
These two boys are very popular, and a 
great many of their friends have been giving 
them parties one right after the other. 
Eddie and Lee both declare that being popu- 
lar isn't so bad, after all — except when you 
have to be to work early in the morn. 

Monroe Salisbury has returned from San 
Diego, where he has been in chief support 
of Margarita Fischer in "The Devil's Assist- 
ant," and has gone down to his ranch to get 
acquainted with all his live stock again. 
When he retires from the screen, Monroe 
intends to devote all his time to his ranch. 

Director Joe de Grasse has just finished 
"The Flashlight Girl," at the Universal plant, 
with William Stowell, Dorothy Phillips and 
Lon Chaney as the principals. It is a five- 
reel mountain drama and is said to contain 
some new and novel effects. 

Speaking of novel effects, J. P. MacGowan 
is certainly getting some beautiful night 
stuff in the new serial he is producing for 
the Mutual, with Helen Holmes as star. Of 
course, it is a railroad story, but the night 
lighting he has in this series' first part, on 
which he is working at present, surpasses 
anything I have seen in this line. 

Dainty Ora Carew, the Keystone belle, is a 
prime favorite with every one at the studio, 
and is a very jolly little girl indeed. She 
has a new pet name with the other members 
of the studio forces, which now number 
nineteen companies. They call her "Little 
Miss Happiness." 

Lois Weber is producing another play that 
promises to be quite a thriller. It is known 
now as "Even as You and I." 

{Continued on page 151) 




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Rowland Thomas, an "unknown writer," re- 
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MAR -3 1917 ©-6385884 C 

Vol. XIII April, 1917 No. 3 

viJNTErNTnr „ ^gg^ Tmotion pictude 

O JggT • MAGAZINE • 

PAGE 

Cover Design. Painting of Fay Tincher Leo Sielke, Jr. 

Photoplay Reviews. Critical comment on current cinemas .... "Junius" et al. 10 

Patter from the Pacific. All the latest news from the Coast . . . Dick Melbourne 14 

Art Gallery of Fifteen Popular Players . • . . . 19-33 

Screen Fashion Plates and Fashions . . Pearl Gaddis 34 

Marie Doro and the Cold Eye at the Camera Arthur Pollock 38 

Our Screen Stars and Their Stars. Marguerite Clark and Charles Chaplin, Johnson Briscoe 41 

Carlyle Blackwell as a Host Lillian May 47 

A Girl's Folly. Short story featuring Robert Warwick and Doris Kenyon . . Gladys Hall 49 

Peggy Burke, Thinker G. T. Bindbeutel 58 

The Divine Theda . ■ Roberta Courtlandt 59 

Shell Fright vs. Screen Fright ......... Hi Sibley 63 

The Golden Girl. A morning with Nell Craig . . . . Hazel Simpson Xaylor 66 

When My Lady Smiles Carol Lee 69 

"Sweet Anita" Stewart Marjorie Gleyre Lachmund 73 

The Photodrama. A department for photoplaywrights . . . Henry Albert Phillips 75 

Quotation Fancies a la Movie Lillian Blackstonc 77 

Max Lixder Comes Across. Short story ...... Edwin M. LaRoche SO 

Billie Burke at Home Roberta Courtlandt 91 

Battle Busixess. Nine kinds of sudden death in filmland warfare . . Paul H. Dowling 96 

Adventures of a Cub. A chat with William S. Hart . . . Martha Groves McKelvie 103 

Lilly Lissum in Lingerie Fritzi Remont 107 

Thirteexth-Hour Greexroom Jottixgs. A satire .... Alvin T. Liphard, M.D. Ill 
The Doll Lady. Disclosing the Peter Pan-ishness of Mary Fuller . H. H. Van Loan 112 

Breakixg Ixto the Movies in California . . . . . . . . Suzette Booth 115 

Limericks. Prize contest for our readers 119 

Are They Married? And, If So, To Whom? Thomas IV. Gilmer 123 

Greenroom Jottings. Little whisperings from everywhere in playerdom 124 

Answers to Inquiries. By the greatest and original ...... Answer Man 127 

Letters to the Editor 152 

Stage Plays That Are W'orth While 166 



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ircijer fV. King, Western Advertising Representative at Chicago. 

ipyright, 1917, in United States and Great Britain, by The M. P. Publishing Co., a New York Corporation. 

fJ. Stvjart Blackton, President; E. V. Brewster, Sec.-Treas., publishers of Motion Picture { QaKc"" 5 

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1917 



r 1# «^ERy or 

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FANNIE WARD 




Screen Fashion 



By PEAfl 

Time was when "any old thing" would do for a screen play. 
Those were the days when an actress from the speaking 
stage, unable to get a stage engagement, accepted, albeit 
reluctantly, offers to "pose" for a Moving Picture. Saving her 
stage gowns, concealing her identity because ashamed of "stoop- 
ing" to pictures, her evening gowns for pictures were usually 
composed of a portiere curtain and a bureau-scarf. 

But those days are gone. Nowadays, my lady of the screen 
must spend the greater part of her salary on wonderful gowns 
that will charm the most captious critic in the audience. And 
there must be lots of them, too. 

Fannie Ward draws an enormous salary from the Lasky 
Company ; but Fannie pleads that her clothes cost so much that 

she's afraid she's going to have to 
give up her new home and move to 
the poorhouse, with Husband Jack 
Dean, unless the price 
of silks and satins 
takes a slump ! Fan- 
nie is shown here 
wearing a gown 
that explains why 
some women 
leave home to go 
into the pictures. 
There is a delight- 
fully youthful air 
about the frock, 
which is composed of 
pale pink taffeta and silver 
lace. The taffeta skirt is 
draped attractively, being 
1& caught here and there with bunches 

of pastel-shaded hand-made roses. 
The skirt is caught up in front, to 
reveal a double-decked petticoat of 
silver lace, over silver taffeta, and 
the mere apology for a bodice is of 
the same fragile lace. A half-wreath 
of the shaded roses acts as a sleeve 
over one shoulder. With this cos- 
tume, the little Lasky star wears 
silver-embroidered stockings, and 
silver slippers adorned with a saucy pink rose. 
Of course, when one thinks of an evening frock, the 
next thought is for a wrap to shield its frail beauty from 
cold night- winds, carelessly slammed limousine doors and^ 
the like. Gloria Swanson, tiny little Keystone maid, cre- 
ated quite a sensation recently when she appeared at a 
'first night" in Los Angeles wearing 
the wrap pictured here, 
with, 
measured 



To begin 
coat 



this 
nine 



KATHLYN WILLIAMS 



34 



Plates and Fashi 



ANITA STEWART 



ions 



GADDIS 



'?™ the bottom and it is a Mile de Paris importation 
The color is raspberry, the material panne velvet. The ferine 
skirt is fastened to a deep yoke and falls in ripples almost to 
the bottom of the dress. The bottom of the coat s ehiWatelv 
trimmed with marabou, in the natural color-a delightful soft 
and clingy trimming for the soft velvet. The marabou i in deen 
scallops to follow the flare of the rippling coat, and extends 
in a wide collar about the throat and down the front Ten "th 
of the coat. Deep cuffs of marabou and an outline of shiS 
a the bottom of the sleeve, with a cord about the yoke form 
attractive features of the coat- which, by the way is a 
adaptation of a style from the Louis Quinze 3 period 
Then there's Kathlyn Williams in an unusually prettv after- 
noon frock of heavy, embroidered net over blue taffeta The 
front of the bodice, the deep, shaped cuffs, and a broad band 

ftill of I" \° U ° m >™ als °<? f bl «e, and a little, knife-plate 
frill of a deeper shade of blue adds to the beauty of the little 
:*,^ are ™><* longer this season, and many of the 
most skilful .designers have obtained this effect by a petticoat- 
hke frill o lace which comes below the ankles. An attractive 
example of tins quaint conceit is given in this frock of Miss 
Wilhams. A small black velvet Tarn hat, and a pink chiffon 
parasol, with white kid boots, finish a stunning outfit U his 
proves that Kathlyn Williams has other accomp ushments 
besides the comparatively simple one of making the wildest 

ttr/ m t S rf Urr hk ?, a tame house-cat-she can wear clothes 
ha look like a million dollars, and she does it with an a ir 

that would do credit to Mrs. Astor 

Richfeller, with a Fifth Avenue 

mansion, a Newport villa, and 

shooting-box in Scotland! 

Speaking of society maids and 

matrons, here's a charming ex- 
ample of how a well-bred debu- 
tante should (but doesn't) look 

m her debut gown. Anita 

Stewart is the debutante, and 

she designed the frock, that is 

the essence of springtime and 
young love and girlhood. It 

(the dress, not Anita!) is com- 
posed of pale yellow chiffon over 
yellow tulle. The overdress is 
adorned with five bands of 
flowered ribbon, while the un- 
derskirt of yellow tulle has 
loops of pale vellow satin 
ribbon. The 
bodice is of « 
the yellow * fc * 




h^'< 





35 



VALENTINE GRANT 



DOROTHY DA I. TO A 



VTRGTNTA PEARSON 




chiffon, with a wreath of soft satin roses over one shoulder. 
A girdle of pale gold tissue completes the costume — unless 
you count the crownless hat of pale gold lace, with a wreath 
of tiny yellow roses. 

From the sublimely adorable fragility of a yellow chiffon 

evening frock to. the stunning "practicality" of a limousine 

coat and accessories. Here's Dorothy Dalton, looking like 

Miss Fifth Avenue on a shopping tour, wearing a hat of 

Tete de Negre basket- weave velvet-and-gold cloth, showing 

the Chinese influence in an ornament of tinsel, topped with 

fur. The coat is of black velvet, very soft and fine, full 

flare model, with bell-shaped sleeves. The very large 

cape collar is of squirrel fur, and a narrow band of the 

same fur adorns the sleeves. 

Never -has there been a season, when so many evening 

frocks, dance frocks, and the like, roamed at large. The 

movie maids have gone dance-frock mad. (The distinc- 

| tion between a dance and dinner, or evening, frock is 

that the former is usually ankle-length, or shorter, 

while the latter has a train! Simple, isn't it?) According 

to that, Valentine Grant is shown wearing a dinner dress, 

designed by T. J. Simpson, of black satin. The- dress is 

skilfully draped, and the only adornment is the black jet 

straps or bands over the shoulders and the full, black chiffon 

sleeves. The designer has very wisely depended solely on 

the draping and the long, ocfdly shaped train for his effect, 

rather than with a lot of trimming. With the dress, Miss 

Grant carries a large ostrich feather fan of black with an 

ebony handle. 

Black has been recognized as one of the best 
possible colors for picture purposes — or black 
and white, skilfully combined. Miss Vir- 
ginia Pearson has evolved a street costume 
that is decidedly striking, as well as very 
beautiful. With a street dress of black 
satin, with full lace sleeves, she wears 
high white boots, a stunning set of 
ermine furs, and a black hat. Even 
her bag carries out the black-and- 
white idea, for it is of black velvet 
embroidered in white. 

But Margaret Thompson, of Tri- 
angle, who specializes, as it were, in 
ingenue leads, realizes the value of 
white in portraying youth and 
beauty. And she exhibits a good- 
looking street frock of ivory-white 
broadcloth. It is built on long, 
straight lines, and depends 
for distinctiveness on a loose, 
high belt, cloth-covered 
buttons and patch 
pockets — not to men- 
tion the 
charm 
of the 
wearer. 




Photo by Carpenter 
MARGARET THOMPSON 



Photo by Parke Bros. 
LUCILLE LEE STEWART 



36 



JUNE CAPRICE 



An inserted yoke of white Georgette crepe and a collar 
of the same material relieve the gown of its severity. 
She doesn't believe in the all-white costume, so she 
relieves the monotony of the color by a blue fox fur, 
and a hat of gray Georgette crepe and braid, having a 
knot of delicate pink roses at the front edge of the brim. 

Then, the fur craze has roamed over the country, 
having attacked some of the players to the extent of 
many thousands of dollars. Lucille Lee Stewart, of Vita- 
graph, proudly exhibits a gorgeous coat of chinchilla, 
which she proudly asserts cost the sum of nine thousand 
dollars. (Which sounds like truth, for if she had been fib- 
bing, she'd have "gone another thousand" and called it 
ten thousand dollars!) With the coat she wears a big 
black velvet hat with a brim that is gracefully shaped. i 

Of course, you know that little June Caprice is going 
to help teach the young American miss how to dress well. 
If they follow the idea of June's frock here, it's a settled 
affair that they will be well gowned ! It is of ivory-white 
taffeta draped over lace that is embroidered in crystals. The 
skirt of taffeta hangs in four points, each of which is 
weighted with a yellow rose. A broad band of silver sequins 
composes the bodice and is finished with a corsage of yellow 
satin roses. Golden slippers, with rhinestone buckles, complete 
the costume. 

In a very famous Broadway hotel, Alice Brady appeared 
at dinner one evening wearing a frock of dark-gray panne 
velvet combined with silver lace. The bodice was in surplice 
style, with a band of silver lace completed with a diamond 
buckle. The three-quarter-length 
sleeves, very wide and loose, were 
also of the silver lace. With this 
gown (which was of the dinner 
variety, and swept close to the 
pretty heels of the wearer) was 
worn a broad black velvet hat 
trimmed with birds of paradise. A 
magnificent stole of kolinsky was 
also a most attractive feature. 
And, of course, Alice cre- 
ated quite a sensation at 
the dinner tables thruout 
the room ! 

Dorothy Kelly is fond 
of a frock of white 
net over white taffeta. 
The overskirt, of net, 
is trimmed with al- A 
ternating ruffles and ^ 
tucks, going around, 
while the taffeta under- 
skirt has strips of 
ribbon 'running 
up and down." 



&> 




37 



.ftioio by Apeua 
DOROTHY KELLY 




1'hoto by \N liite 
ALICE BRADY 



3^ 



22 



f arxe Jsoro andt/ze 



It is a good voice that tickles one's ear 
over the telephone. Marie 
Doro is one of those 
rare girls who have such 
voices. Over the wire that 
crackled and sang with a * 
ruthless vigor that seemed to 
symbolize the bus;tie and noise 
of a busy metropolis, Miss 
Doro's simple words sounded 
restful, cool and color- 
ful, as she granted 
the request for 
an interview 
Only a 
few calm 
phrases ; 
but I 



softly deter- 
mined ; a cul- 
tured, can- 
did, medi- 
tative voice 
— the voice 
of an expe- 
rienced, 




hung 
up the 
receiver 
and rubbed 
my ear in 
gleeful satisfac- 
tion. But there was 
more than mere music in her tones. 
There was character— her whole charac- 
ter. And I said to myself, as I rubbed 
my ear, "It's silly to ask to see this girl; 
her voice tells everything." For it was 
a steady voice, delicate but direct, and 



all serene. 
And she 
proved to be 
all the voice 
had pre- 
saged. She 



db/tfS/e att/iedhmera 




the film version 

of Sardou's "Diplomacy" for Famous 
Players, and was leaving almost immedi- 
ately for the Lasky studios in Hollywood 
with Elliott Dexter, who, by one of those 
curious coincidences, had played the part 
of her husband in the stage production of 
"Diplomacy," had played it again in the 



39 



or seven 
months now. 
enacted the 
role in real 
life. All day. 
preparatory 
to her de- 
parture, she 
had scurried 
about the 
city, b u s y 
with a thousand unavoidable or diverting 
devoirs. Now there was but a brief 
moment to spare. 

"Yes," she said calmly, in answer to 



40 



MARIE DORO AND THE COLD EYE AT THE CAMERA 



my question, "acting for a cold-eyed 
camera is, of course, quite different from 
playing before a responsive, applauding 
audience. At first it seemed like per- 
forming in an empty room or responding 
to a photographer's 'Look pleasant, 
please,' or making expressive faces for 
a few friends who stood about, stolid and 
unimpressionable. I missed the exhila- 
ration, the emotional stimulus, the spur 
one receives from the responsive, eager 
spectators." 

I managed to stop thinking of her 
voice in time to ask, "Is it, then, more 
difficult to work up to the proper emo- 
tional pitch in the studio than on the 
stage ?•" 

"Well, the studio has its compensa- 
tions. It soon became apparent to me 
that the camera, tho it seemed cold and 
inscrutable, was at the same time a bit 
forbidding and absolutely uncompro- 
mising. I mean by that that it glares 
at one as if to say, 'I see H everything you 
do; the least insincerity, the slightest 
carelessness I will record. Be thorn!' 
To the conscientious actor that is sig- 
nificant. The spur of the camera re- 
places the stimulus erf the audience's 
enthusiasm. 

"After I had seen my own films ex- 
hibited before an average audience, I 
could not help but get the spirit of the 
thing. And now it is easy, while playing 
to an unemotional lens, to imagine the 
impressionable spectators sitting enrap- 
tured on the ends of their seats, anxious 
to smile or sigh, to gasp or gulp down 
tears. It is a simple matter to play to 
such people thru the camera." 

Tho I realized that she was talking 
wisely with regard to the Moving Pic- 
ture actor's psychology, I found myself 
taking in her words and letting them 
soothe me as sounds rather than en- 
lighten me as sense, treating them as 
music only and trying to interpret her 
thru the music of her voice. Over the 
telephone her tones had hinted at sin- 
cerity, poise, serenity. I compared her 
with her voice, as she sat there talking 
so calmly. In her quiet, dark eyes — 
those dusky, long-lashed eyes that have 
set so many writers rhapsodizing — there 
was a placid glow. Under a thick cloud 
of deep brown hair — of the same hue, 



almost, as the eyes — her face, with its 
piquant lines and delicately accentuated 
cheekbones, showed none of the effects 
of the day's confusion. Her hands lay 
motionless in her lap — no fluttering, af- 
fectedly feminine fingers slyly patted her 
back hair or smoothed out the folds of 
the dainty gown that here and there 
gave out an unobtrusive note of brown, 
thereby subtly emphasizing the rich color 
of eyes and hair. She did not gush ; she 
emitted no girlish gurgles, performed 
none of the cute or silly tricks of the 
practiced ingenue. There was in her de- 
meanor no semblance of that I'11-dazzle- 
this- wight- with-a-devastating- smile -and- 
make-him-turn-a-handspring manner that 
so many actresses employ with inter- 
viewers. Sincere, serene, poiseful-^her 
voice had said it. 

Then she told me about herself. At 
sixteen she left Miss Brown's school in 
New York to take an engagement in 
stock in St. Paul that had been offered 
her by a manager who had seen her act 
in amateur theatricals at school. After 
that she came back to New York and 
had a part in "The Billionaire," and soon 
after she was out in San Francisco with 
Augustin Daly. From the first she played 
big parts, but her first great fame she 
gained in "The Girl from Kays." There- 
after,' she appeared in "Friquet" and 
"Mary Ann," under Mr. Frohman's man- 
agement, and later, with William Gillette, 
in "Clarice," the delightful "Morals of 
Marcus," and, latterly, "Diplomacy." 
Her interpretation of "Oliver Twist," of 
course, is well known. In the films she 
had done several of her stage successes, 
and will be remembered in a long list of 
features, including "The White Pearl," 
"Common Ground," "The Heart of Nora 
Flynn" and, more recently, "The Lash." 

Perhaps it is because she is a trained 
musician that her voice has in it so many 
pleasing cadences. She sang the prin- 
cipal role, not long ago, in "Patience." 
A number of musical compositions bear 
her name. Her "Bagdad" and "The 
Clarice Waltzes" have been popular in 
Paris and elsewhere on the Continent as 
well as in America; her "Little Doggie 
in Our Yard" helped Hattie Williams 
make a hit in musical comedy. 
{Continued on page 160) 



V^/ 'and* </T\ 

/THEIR <3 UM> 






How the Heavenly Stars Have Endowed Our Screen Favorites 
The Solar Biologies of Some of Our Well-known Players 

(While it is indisputably true that heredity, environment and 
association have a great influence upon one's character, in the 
present series an endeavor will be made to show the specific plane- 
tary influences which have governed many of our screen stars.) 

MARGUERITE SNOW, Born September 9, 1891 

(Read these articles carefully, because if you were born on these dates, the facts may 

apply to you as well as to Marguerite Snow and Charles Chaplin) 

The Stellar Constellation at this time — Virgo — saw the Moon 
in Sagittarius, with Mercury in Pisces, and Venus influ- 
enced, only slightly, by Virgo. 

You may rely absolutely upon it that Marguerite Snow is 
going to accomplish great things ere she has finished with this 
earthly sphere. That which she has already achieved, and she 
has been far more successful than most in filmdom, is as nothing 
when compared with the goal which she has set for herself. 
When you find Virgo with the Moon in Sagittarius, there is sure 
to be a tremendous intensity, an overwhelming power for domi- 
nance and leadership. Nothing is more distasteful or more galling 
to these people than a secondary position, to be a marcher in the 
ranks, and not to be up and doing and constantly forging ahead 
is the very epitome of their unhappiness. They are the most 
zealous, tireless workers, too, able and energetic, and they will 
spare neither themselves nor those around them in their efforts 
to achieve their ends. 

Miss Snow's success upon both the screen and stage may be 
largely attributed to her faith in herself — the sure, personal 
knowledge of one's own self which brooks no defeat. She knows 
thoroly what she can do, of what she is capable, and she will go 
about it in a sane, sensible way to accomplish any undertaking. 
And, like all Virgo people, she has no illusions about her capa- 
bilities. These are the people who make sort of mental inventories 



OUR SCREEN STARS AND THEIR STARS 



42 

of their capabilities and seek to bring 
about their higher development. You 
rarely, if ever, hear them crying out for 
the moon, and they do not waste then- 
time and talents in following 
professions for which they 
are un suited. The 
Virgo born^ quite 
early in life, 
find them- 
selves/so 
to speak, 
an d '-.= 
they 



effort the next time. Therein lies much 
of the story of her screen triumphs, 
her tireless efforts to do big- 

ger and 
better 
work. 




are 
nearly 
always 
numbered 
among the 
successful peo- 
ple in the world. 
Personal failure is almost a 
thing unknown to them, and # 
if they ever taste of defeat it is 
generally thru no fault of their 
own. - # 

And they rebound so splendidly 
from disaster! A hard^ knock or 
two is merely an incentive to put 
forth more effort. They arise 
smiling and serene from troubled 
waters, and plunge in again, more 
determined than ever to grasp the 
god success. You _ may be sure 
that M.iss Snow, if unhappy or 
dissatisfied over tin- results of 
some of her! screen work, 
will not sit -about and 
brood over the effect. 
attempting to ex- 
plain or excuse it 
all, but she will 
simply resolve to 
make all the more 




l'lioto by Bangs 



MARGUERITE SNOW (iVAN) 






OUR SCREEN STARS AND THEIR STARS 



43 



And, believe me, it would be the same 
thing if she were a cook or a grand opera 
prima donna ! 

It is more than probable that a great 
many of Miss Snow's friends will tell you 
that she has a propensity for advice giv- 
ing, directing and suggesting and advis- 
ing those around her. This, incidentally, 
is a never-failing Virgo characteristic. 
These people never lose an opportunity 
to air their views and express their opin- 
ions — this as relative to the conduct of 
those around them — and they often con- 
vey the impression of meddling in other 
people's affairs unnecessarily. Should 
you ever overhear such a chance phrase 
as, "I'm telling you all this, my- dear, for 
your own good," it is safe to assume that 
it is a Virgo child speaking. But they 
should be dealt with kindly for this ap- 
parent weakness because of their absolute 
sincerity and well-meaning. They give 
advice only where they feel advice is 
necessary. At that, mind you, too, it is 
just as well to pay some attention to any 
Virgo suggestion or advice. With their 
observant, analytical minds, plus unusual 
powers of concentration, these people are 
far often in the right, and tho they fre- 
quently speak the truth as they see it, and 
it may hurt the recipient's feelings, it 



is rarely ever done in a spirit of malice 
or unkindness. 

Miss Snow is a great lover of all things 
beautiful, especially as relating to nature. 
She can sit for hours upon a mountain- 
top and feast upon the view around her, 
and a walk along a country road or lane 
will refresh and delight her as nothing 
else. She is probably apt to expend her 
nervous energy, to throw herself too 
thoroly into her work at times, to be 
prodigal with her restless vitality, and 
she is always sure to pay for her reck- 
lessness, her overtaxing of nature. But 
all Virgo people quickly rebound from 
any mental or physical collapse and 
always plunge into the game with as 
much zeal as ever. 

They are among the leaders in the 
world, in anything where sympathy, tact 
and understanding are important factors, 
and it is not surprising to find among 
Virgo children such well-known direc- 
tors as Francis Ford, Sidney Drew, 
Harry C. Myers, Richard Ridgely, John 
Ince and Tefft Johnson. All in all, 
especially with their critical faculties 
held in abeyance, the Virgo folk are a 
pretty fine set of people. And you may 
be sure that Marguerite Snow is among 
the very finest. 



M M M 



CHARLES CHAPLIN, Born April 16, 1889 



The Stellar Constellation at this time — 
the Aries-Taurus Cusp — saw the Moon 
in Scorpio, with Mercury in Aries, and 
Venus influenced, only slightly, by 
Scorpio. 

We hear many pathetic stories of 
Charles Chaplin's childhood, of the pov- 
erty and unhappiness which he knew, and 
the general gray tone of his early life. 
But it was a foregone conclusion, his 
early unhappy years notwithstanding, 
that he would soon make his way in the 
world ; find an environment wholly to his 
liking. For this quiet, modest-bearing 
young fellow — and we are speaking of 
Chaplin the man, not the screen cut-up — 
would have fought his way in the world, 
no matter what barriers or obstacles he 
had to overcome. He is admirably quali- 
fied to look after himself, firm, strong 



and resolute, with an executive ability of 
the best, and it is just as well to give him 
ample room when his temper is aroused — 
it is such a bully good temper ! He can 
put up the best sort of fight, be it physi- 
cal or veioal, and it takes him a long, 
long time to cool off, once his antagonism 
is aroused. 

Mr. Chaplin has probably had to work 
very hard, and put up with a great deal 
in order to reach his supremacy in film- 
dom, all of which has merely been an 
incentive for greater effort. He has a 
fine streak of combativeness in his make- 
up, and you will have to be pretty keenly 
alert to best him in any venture or un- 
dertaking. It is not surprising that he 
has practically created a screen art of his 
own, for he possesses much originality 
and an energetically progressive spirit. 



44 



OUR SCREEN STARS AND THEIR STARS 



Nothing is more distasteful to him 
than stagnation, and, be assured 
of this, when his hour shall strike 
to abdicate from practical screen 
leadership he himself will be the 
first to know it. and he will accept 
the inevitable with a gracious 
spirit. He will probably by that 
time, in any case, have hit upon a 
new field' of expression, have 
found some other outlet for his 
talent, and he will give free rein 
to it. His originality and pro- 
gressiveness are the sign-posts 
which will guide him into safe 
waters in any undertaking. 

A word of warning might be 
given Mr. Chaplin to conserve his 
powers, to be less prodigal with 
his nervous energy and force: All 
Aries-Taurus people, with their 
temper, determination, and often 
utter disregard for accepted stand- 
ards, are such fine plungers and 
colossal workers, hustling along 
superlatively, all too often at the 
expense of their peace of mind and 
state of health. They spare neither 
themselves nor others ! If they 
can keep up a steady pressure for 
twenty-four hours, everybody else 
can do likewise, is very frequently 
their favorite argument. And the 
worst of it — at least for the rest of 
us poor mortals — these people get 
results more often than not. Their 
very recklessness, plus their un- 
questioned capability, seems to di- 
rect them in just the paths they 
would follow. 

The resourcefulness of the 
Aries-Taurus born is ofttimes 
amazing. Strange to say, Charles 
Chaplin would have been as great 
a success as a business man as he 
is in his chosen artistic field. This 
ability to swing from the artistic 
to tlie commercial and to temper 
one with the other is a gift peculiar to 
the mid-April born. Environment, hard 
luck, -tress of circumstances, will often 
obscure the fortunes of the Aries-Taurus 
child, but in the end he or she can be 
counted on to win out and to overcome 
what would appear to be an insuperable 
difficulty. 




CHARLIE CHAPLIN S LUCKY STAR MUST HAVE BEEN 
TAKEN, BECAUSE THIS IS WHEN HE SIGNED THAT 



It was an absolutely certain thing that 
Mr. Chaplin would find a peculiar and 
unique position upon the screen. A 
nature such as his must have a free 
expression, must strike out for itself and 
find a field of virgin soil. He chafes 
under the conventional, and a sense of 
leadership is as much a part of him 



OUR SCREEX STARS AXD THEIR STARS 



45 




SHINING BRIGHTLY WHEN THIS PICTURE W 
CONTRACT FOR $670,000 A YEAR, A YEAR AGO 

as his arms and legs. Without a doubt 
many interesting tales could be told of 
his old Keystone days and the difficul- 
ties experienced in trying to have him 
accept direction at the hands of others. 
And it must often have been a strenuous 
job to get him to do something he did 
not wish to do. From the very first he 



AS 



surely wanted to do things in his 
own way, to express himself in a 
wholly individual style, and the 
result must often have been con- 
siderably more than a tempest in 
a tea-pot. 

You may be sure of one thing 
which cannot brook contradiction, 
and that is that Air. Chaplin has 
any number of most loyal and de- 
voted friends, those who believe 
in him and stand by him thru 
everything. He has "built up his 
circle of warm friendships thru 
his own faith and confidence in 
those upon whom he bestows his 
affections. A Chaplin friend can 
do no wrong. He will absolutely 
believe no evil of his chosen ones, 
and it would be a brave person, 
not to say unkind one, who would 
seek to shake his faith in any of 
his circle. 

Pride is a characteristic of the 
Aries-Taurus progeny — pride of 
race, pride of accomplishment, 
pride of self, but not such a 
pride as will develop into in- 
ordinate vanity or self-worship. 
Y\ 'hen Air. Chaplin sets out to do 
a thing, he wants to do it right 
or not at all, and it is his sense 
of pride, as well as his thoro- 
ness and orderliness, that holds 
him to his course. His pride is 
no selfish creature, and in his 
desire for accomplishment his 
pride extends to all those who 
work with him to do their level 
best. 

A fitting final tribute may be 
paid him for his persevering in- 
dustry. Once started upon a task 
he will allow nothing to swerve 
him from its successful consum- 
mation ; he will work and apply 
himself early and late.: nothing 
can daunt or discourage him ; and 
he applies himself to even' new under- 
taking- with the zeal of the born enthu- 
siast 

the worker 
sake. 

And therein, I am sure, lies much of 
the secret of Charles Chaplin's well- 
merited success. 



with the delight in his task of 
•ho works for work's 




Sai O San, from far Japan, 

Is a dear little, queer little Japanese fan. 

"I like the honorable movies so," 

She says, " 'most every night I go 

To see the nice American girls, 

With their funny dresses and pretty curls; 

But most of all I love to see 

The Japanese scenes so dear to me." 

Thus spoke quaint little Sai O San, 

A dainty Japanese movie fan. 

46 




Carlyle Blackwell as a Host 



By LILLIAN MAY 



«/\f course I give bachelor dinners/" 
\J said Carlyle Blackwell, the Mov- 
ing Picture star, whom the 
matinee girl has christened "The Prince 
of Popularity." 

"I have to, under the circumstances," 
he continued. He didn't volunteer any 
information as to what the circumstances 
were, and I inferred from his expression 
that it was some hidden secret, and did 
not attempt to pry into the s-tronghold of 
memory's chamber. 

But I did ask him to describe one of 
his favorite dinners, and he responded in 
a way that made me wish I was a 
bachelor — that I might have an invitation 
to some one of those functions. 

"First," he said, "I make it a point to 
ask only men who I know are con- 
genial. Not necessarily well acquainted, 
but men whose tastes and interests run 
along the same line somewhat. Other- 
wise, they are likely to bore each other 



47 



frightfully. I have plenty of good cigars 
and cigarets of different brands in evi- 
dence when they arrive. It helps to tide 
over the space before dinner is an- 
nounced, which is a critical time. Of 
course, all men dont smoke before dinner ; 
but then, some do. 

"Next comes the dinner ; 'and if I do 
say it as shouldn't,' I know when a table 
is properly set, and how to serve a dinner. 

"On four sides of the table, which must 
be clad with immaculate damask, I place 
four crystal dishes for radishes, celery, 
salted nuts and olives. 

"I serve the soup at the table from a 
tureen, and I usually omit the fish course. 

"Next comes a saddle of lamb, with 
peas and new potatoes, and a side-dish of 
macaroni au gratin. 

"I usually mix the salad at the table, 
tho at times I have it put on the indi- 
vidual plates and served from the kitchen. 
Hearts of lettuce and asparagus-tips is 



48 



CARLYLE BLACKWELL AS A HOST 



my favorite, I think. I have the lettuce 
very crisp, and the asparagus-tips very 
cold. I always mix the dressing myself 
at the table. Just a simple French dress- 
ing from oil, vinegar, salt and pepper and 
a dash of paprika. 

"For dessert, an ice is convenient, and 
men always like them. In season I like 
to serve cantaloupes cut in halves, the 
sections rilled with pistachio cream or 
pineapple ice. And I serve two kinds of 
cheese, crackers, and last, coffee. That 
completes the meal and is elaborate 
enough for anybody. 

"And," he laughed, "do you know I 
can run around the corner to one of the 
big stores, or to a restaurant half-way 
down the block, and serve that dinner 
with half an hour's notice, if necessary 
— and no fuss in the kitchen, and no 
cross maid who thinks she is overworked. 

"I do a lot of cooking, however, for 
my friends, especially chafing-dish sup- 
pers, with Welsh rarebits and creamed 
oysters and things of that sort. How- 
ever, that is another story. But — I ab- 



solutely refuse to wash the dishes. I 
have been known to wipe them when 
some one particularly charming rolled up 
her sleeves and washed them. However," 
he added with a sigh, "those occasions 
are getting very rare — and, anyhow, 
'that kind' wouldn't be present at a bach- 
elor dinner, so that, too, is another story. 

"Dont use this for an interview," he 
said ; "I dont feel talkative. Just tell them 
about the dinner, and some day I'll have 
a dinner where ladies are admitted, and 
you can come and see for yourself 
whether I know what I am talking about." 

Which would be very nice, indeed. 
(And, of course, the ladies would be in- 
vited to wash the dishes ! ) 

MENU 



Clear Soup 

Saddle of Lamb — Green Peas— New 

Potatoes — Macaroni au Gratin 

Lettuce and Asparagus Salad 

Radishes — Celery — Salted Nuts — Olives 

Ices — Cheese — Coffee 



Maxims of Methuselah 

Translated by HARVEY PEAKE 

My daughter, when thou goest to the picture show, do not stand about 
for a long time in the aisles looking for a choice seat, lest some one who is 
trying to see the picture thou art blotting out rise and smite thee to the earth. 

And remember, flower of my old age! that very few if any people 
have gone to the picture playhouse to hear thee describe, to thy companion, 
the dance of last night, but rather to sit in restful silence and gaze upon the 
wonders on the screen. 

Tear not thy hair because the thoughtless woman in front of thee has 
two long, thick quills upon her hat that obstruct thy view, but rather get out 
the scissors thou hast brought for such emergencies and cut the offending 
obstacle from out thy sight. 

Consider the ant, thou sluggard, and learn wisdom of her. She maketh 
much speed. Yet thou art so slow in getting to the playhouse that it is neces- 
sary for thee to stand thru three-fourths of the program, when a little haste 
would have provided thee a seat in the body of the house. 

Take not a grouch with thee to the picture show, and make not a declara- 
tion to the effect that everything is decayed ; but, rather, put thyself under 
the spell of the pictures and come away with a serene mind and a happy heart. 

And lastly, daughter of mine ! look not with disdain upon an invita- 
tion to go with thy "steady" to the motion play, instead of the grand opera, 
for it may haply be that thine enjoyment and understanding may be much 
greater at the former than at the latter. Yea, verily. Selah ! 




WAS NOT MEANT FOR RURALTON, NEW 
JERSEY," SAID MARY BAKER 



A Girl's Folly 

(Paragon) 

By GLADYS HALL 



Mary Baker, of Ruralton, New 
Jersey, was precisely like about 
nine-tenths of the other young 
things of her wholly delectable age and 
sex. She was not a whit better, not a 
whit worse ; she was very romantic, very 
foolish, and very, very pretty — pretty in 
a luscious, peach-bloomy sort of a way — 
irresistibly pretty, and poutily well aware 
of it. Also, she had the prevailing and 
characteristic fault of her particular type 
— she could perceive no beauty in the 
things at hand, no virtues in her own 
people. Always and ever her brain 



49 



sought far visions, dreamed and moaned 
over extravagant lovers, top-loftical plans 
— people of gilt in a tinsel world — un- 
realities that are sweetmeats to untried 
youth, but make poor bread for the long, 
stern way of life. 

She had opened her eyes to the world 
in Ruralton, New Jersey ; she had gone 
to Ruralton's very rural school, danced 
and played with Ruralton's young people. 
In odd moments she had read sensational 
best-sellers and the cheaper magazines, 
and of late she had mostly fretted and 
lamented, loudly and unrlatteringly, the 



50 



A GIRL'S FOLLY 



horrid undesirability of her home, her 
parents, her friends, and her lover. 

For the first, it was a small, neat, com- 
monplace dwelling, midway between a 
suburban house and a farm. For the 
second, they were much like the place 
that housed them — neat and somewhat 
commonplace. They had married late in 
life, had never been very successful, nor, 
as a matter of fact, very ambitious, and 
had had this one beautiful, phenomenal, 
incomprehensible girl-child. To the 
mother, who had herself dreamed dreams 
long and long ago, the girl was those 
dreams — those baffling, chameleon dreams 
come true — just that. She was the 
whole tint — the bright and fairy and 
lovely tint — of her life's dull texture. She 
worshiped her altogether, and prayed for 
her, and worked like a drudge for her, 
and spoilt her, and poured the distilled 
libation of her soul over her, and didn't 
understand her in the least. And really, 
there was surprisingly little to under- 
stand, once one got beyond the mystify- 
ingly beautiful hue and flesh of her. But 
Mother Baker couldn't very well. Here 
was she, gnarled, and sort of bent, and 
grayish, and wispy, and wholly unlovely ; 
and here was Ezekiel very much the 
same, if not worse; and here — and here 
was Mary, stuff of rainbows, and dew, 
and June mornings, and moondrift, and 
all. "Perhaps," thought Mother Baker, 
not without whimsy and pathos, "per- 
haps my soul is better'n my body, and 
Mary is child of my soul." 

But then again, there wasn't much 
soul to Mary — not in these fretful days, 
anyway. She was quite grossly and ab- 
sorbedly the hedonist — the materialist. 
She wanted gorgeous, and probably very 
garish, clothes for her slender, beautiful 
body. She wanted marvelous motors to 
convey that same body about. She wanted 
a lover, dressed as the knights of old, or 
as royalty of today, to make most pas- 
sionate love to her. She wanted all these 
things— hungrily — with the abandoned 
hunger that is the core of the heart of 
youth. 

As for the friends and the lover — the 
former were products of Ruralton, New 
Jersey. The latter was also a product, 
set apart just now, by a very desperation 
of love for Mary. She had exalted him ; 



her beauty had raised him above the 
plane he moved on and set strange yearn- 
ings in his soul, strange longings in his 
heart. Outside of that, and just for him- 
self, he was very clean, and honest, and 
church-going, and exceedingly ambitious. 
Already he had planned a garage in 
Ruralton, New Jersey, of which he, 
John Taxminister Applebloom, was to be 
the sole proprietor. All of this — all of 
himself, and his hopes, and his God, and 
his love — he had laid, awkwardly, blush- 
ingly, rustically, at Mary Baker's slip- 
pered, disdainful feet. And, it had 
seemed to him, those dainty feet trod 
right upon his heart, and crushed it and 
bruised it — it hurt him so. 

"I must see the world, John," Mary 
would answer him firmly and — as it 
seemed to her befitted the occasion — a 
little sadly ; "I was not meant for Rural- 
ton, New Jersey." And then she would 
catch herself thinking that he smelled 
horridly of gasoline, and that his hair 
was cut awfully funny, and that his hands 
could be clean, and that his tie fought 
loudly with his shirt; in fact, she saw 
all the many defects of Johnny Apple- 
bloom, and forgot, as — God forgive us! 
— wiser than she have done, that ever he 
had a soul. 

It was on the day that discontent 
reached its zenith in Mary's tormented 
spirit that the great adventure came. All 
morning long she had been reading "The 
Mad, Mad Marriage of Efluvia Floox," or 
some such thing, in the hammock on the 
porch. She had consumed at least a 
pound of very bad caramels, donated by 
Johnny Applebloom. She was harrowed 
of soul and sick of body. She came from 
a world of diamonds and motors, steam 
yachts and Japanese butlers, golden table 
service and priceless wines, to Mother 
Baker, flurried and perspiring ; to Father 
Baker, shirt-sleeved and equipped with a 
pipe; to a plain deal table, and soup in 
earthen bowls. Mary wept tears into the 
soup. Mother Baker followed distraught 
suit ; Father Baker's pipe went out. Mary 
left the table, and gloom, like a pall, 
descended. 

"She must be real sick," sniffled 
Mother Baker. 

"Must be," grunted father. Then they 
stared at one another blankly. Upstairs, 



A GIRL'S FOLLY 



51 



in the room, all sweet with lavender and 
crisp with Swiss curtains, Mary preened 
before the small mirror, donned her pic- 
turesquest hat, and bolted down the 
stairs, slamming the door rudely to after 
her. She hadn't the least idea where she 
was going. She didn't suppose there 
was anywhere to go. If she couldn't do 
anything else, she could go to the en- 
larged shed that was John's embryo 



always, all her life, the most astounding 
thing in it. Down Ruralton's despised 
main street came an amazing procession 
— gloriously beautiful ladies on milk- 
white steeds — ladies with really true pic- 
ture-book curls and really true picture- 
book eyes; absurdly handsome men, in 
vari-colored satin and velvet knickers, 
coats of glistening mail — a motley, mys- 
tical, marvelous picture-book troupe. 




JOHNNY APPLEBLOOM COULD HAVE HAD THEM ALL GOING 



garage, and torment the thoroly tor- 
mentable John. He always, and fear- 
fully, believed in all her bombastic 
threats. He would not have been in the 
least surprised to see her take to herself 
wings and fly away. To him she was so 
rare, so sacred, so beautiful a thing. 

Alary flounced down Ruralton's main 
street. "Oh, I hate you!" she hissed at 
the inoffensive sidewalk; "I hate you! 
Why — why was I ever born!" 

Hard upon this vehement and, alas! 
unoriginal query, there followed an as- 
tounding thing. To Mary Baker it was 



Mary Baker stood still, stock-still. 
"My dreams," she whispered to her beat- 
ing heart, ''my dreams — have come to 
life! Oh, am I dreaming, or are these 
people real? Is — is he real?" 

"He" was the most gorgeously capari- 
soned of all, and he rode a really splen- 
did steed as black as coal. "He" was 
"built like a Greek god," thought Mary, 
and he was fair and handsome beyond 
belief. When Mary looked at him a 
mist swam before her eyes — all her little 
world rocked in its little orbit. It was 
one thing to dream dreams, but another 



52 



A GIRL'S FOLLY 



— oh, quite another! — to have the near- 
est, dearest of all dreams come true- 
come true on a coal-black steed — fair 
and godlike, and flesh and blood. 

Mary did not stand stock-still long. 
She was possessed of the curious bold- 
ness of the small-towner. And, besides, 
she was inherently practical. She could 
not let this great, this sole adventure, 
go. Never, never must the godlike one 
pass her by! Somehow, Mary knew he 
would not come again. 

She approached him, somewhat cau- 
tiously. "There aren't any locations 
around here," she heard him say, a trifle 
wearily, to the most uninteresting- 
looking man in the procession. "I 
think, Harrigan, you're all off on your 
exteriors." 

Mary looked puzzled. Then she 
walked straight to the horse's side, and 
spoke up at him. "Are you a real true 
knight, or a lord, or a what?" she asked, 
with a sort of desperate boldness. She 
didn't — that inherent practicality in her 
— didn't actually believe that he was, but 
she had to begin conversation somehow, 
and she could not think of anything else 
to ask. 

Kenneth Driscoll, Imperial Filums' 
"lead," world-popular, woman-popular, 
suddenly wealthy, unaccountably ennuied 
and especially fagged today, looked 
down. He looked down into ridicu- 
lously big, limpid, tender, colorful eyes, 
on cheeks like the actual glow of the 
rose, on lips like blood, and hair that 
shone sun-gold under the tree-filtered 
sun. He had been, weeks without end, 
looking down into grease-paint, and 
powder, and jetted eye-lashes, and per- 
oxided tresses, and wigs and artificiali- 
ties. In particular, he had been looking 
down into one face guilty of all these 
things, and a soul into which, he sus- 
pected, some of these things had leaked. 
He was unaccountably thrilled, unac- 
countably freshened and revived. All 
at once he felt no longer jaded and a 
bit weary and more than a bit dis- 
gusted. All at once he forgave Harri- 
gan for being so "off" on his exteriors. 

"I'm neither of those things, I regret," 
he told her, with that smile and that 
subtle hint of pathos that had won more 
than one heart for him. "Since you ask 



■ — and seem to expect it — I would to 
God that I were!" 

He said the last in rather a declama- 
tory fashion. It was a way he had — 
born of a naturally theatric manner and 
fostered by the necessity for much of 
such stuff, on the screen and off. But 
Mary Baker didn't suspect that. She 
only knew that he talked just as he 
had talked in the dreams she had 
dreamed — just as all the "he's" talked in 
the books she read. Her eyes shone 
like impossible stars. Her crimson mouth 
seemed to bloom like a flower. She was 
quite the most beautiful thing Kenneth 
Driscoll had ever seen. He dismounted, 
told the "rest of the bunch" to walk 
along a bit, and straightway and elabo- 
rately told her so. 

Under such a stimulus Mary Baker 
became, not Mary Baker of Ruralton, 
N. J., but a creature of her dreams and 
the fiction she had read. She told him, 
in return, of her loneliness, her warped 
and narrowed life, her heart-burnings 
and soul-yearnings. She gave him to 
understand, in language largely bor- 
rowed, that she was a soul in prison, 
hemmed in by tyranny, injustice and 
poverty. Because she seemed very 
beautiful to him„ he believed her. Be- 
cause of that same reason, he advised 
her, against his better judgment, to 
come to the city and try her luck at the 
movies. "You'll gtt all the thrills you 
want," he promised her, "and travel, and 
fame, and money. You'll out-Pickford 
Mary Pickford — you'll set the world 
afire. Just you come and try. Here's 
the name and address of one of the best 
men in the business. Go to him and 
tell him Ken Driscoll sent you. Tell 
him to give you a try-out. And when 
you get there, 'phone me at the Imperial 
studios, and we'll have dinner together." 

Mary Baker left for the city the next 
day. She didn't consider it incumbent 
on her to explain her summary leave- 
taking to Mother and Father Baker. It 
did not dawn upon her that their years 
of patient, anxious care warranted any 
particular farewell. She shed them as 
one sheds a couple of old coats, rather 
relievedly than otherwise. 

Arrived in the city, she followed Dris- 
coll's parting instructions, took a taxi, 



A GIRL'S FOLLY 



53 



gave the chauffeur the address of the stu- 
dio and clambered in. Arrived in the 
studio, she gave Driscoll's card, with her 
name penciled on it, and was ushered 
into a smoky, untidy den and confronted 
by Mr. Bennett, director of most of the 
Star Bright Films. Mr. Bennett lived on 
a diet of pretty faces; he was satiate 
with them — replete. They crossed his 
dulled vision, an endless 



able shouting, and grinding, strange 
lights, strange, costumes, great confu- 
sion and astonishing profanity. 

An unimpressed and certainly unim- 
pressive individual "made a test," in a 
bored manner, and in a bored manner 
dismissed her. 

Mary departed from the studio, dazed- 
ly, and 'phoned Kenneth. She was fright- 
ened, she said, and lonely 




DRISCOLL TOOK HER IN HIS ARMS IT WAS THE FIRST TIME 



chain; they were his business, the money 
in his pocket, raw stock — nothing more. 
He beheld nothing particularly limpid 
nor arresting in Mary Baker. Never- 
theless, he was under obligations to 
Driscoll, obligations that could not be 
gainsaid. It was a plagued nuisance, but 
he'd have to try the girl out. He scrib- 
bled something on a card. "Go up and 
have a test made," he grunted. 

Mary went. She thought him very 
uncivil, and the studio excessively grimy 
and dirtv. There seemed to be consider- 



and homesick. Kenneth was deliciously 
unused to anything feminine that could 
possibly be frightened or would dream 
of being homesick. He took her to din- 
ner. After dinner he took her to an 
eminently respectable boarding-place 
and told her he would await her mes- 
sage on the morrow, when the great 
Bennett would doubtless give his verdict 
in her favor. 

When the operator ran the few feet 
of Mary Baker's test on the morrow, 
the great Bennett raved. "Oh, Gawd!" 



54 



A GIRL'S FOLLY 



he adjured, "Gawd! Wooden — wooden 
— brittle — china — porcelain " 

He said a great deal more in the same 
and in even a more unflattering vein. 
Indignant, Mary Baker didn't wait to 
hear. She departed 
the studio, leaving 
Bennett still inform- 
ing whatever gods 
there be that she was 
anything and every- 
thing but live flesh 
and blood. The last 
words that fell upon 
her scarlet and of- 
fended ear w r ere, 
"Mechanical toy, 
s'help me Gawd!" 

"The rude, nasty 
pig!" thought Mary 
Baker. - 

Driscoll was con- 
solatory. He told 
her she mustn't ex- 
pect to be a Duse 
all in a day. Mary 
hadn't the least idea 
what a Duse was. 
She hoped Kenneth 
wasn't waxing pro- 
fane, too. He reas- 
sured her by giving 
her the directions to 
get to his studio, 
and telling her he 
could use her him- 
self as an extra in 
one of his scenes. 

Kenneth was at- 
tired, more or less 
realistically, as a 
cowboy when Mary, 
very pink and dis- 
tressed and delect- 
able, arrived. She 
thought he was too 
handsome for words. 
He thought she 
looked good enough ™ 
to eat a la carte. 

She was directed to 
rooms above the vast and humming 
studio, and there hustled into an inde- 
scribable costume. 

When Driscoll beheld her follow the 
director's bellowed instructions, he felt 



the justice in Bennett. But he felt per- 
sonally and terribly sorry for her. And 
she had completely charmed him. She 
was the very epitome of youth and love 
and innocence, and yet she was, Driscoll 




a tier of tinv 



THINGS, HONEY. DONT 



knew, an unutterable little fool. He 
would not be despoiling anything very 
noble or fine or worth-while if he took 
her into his care. He would only be 
doing what, if he didn't do it, some one 
else would, and that verv soon. And, 



A GIRL'S FOLLY 



55 



besides, after she had lived a bit and 
learnt — perhaps suffered a bit — she 
could be made pliable, screenable. The 
wooden gaucherie of Ruralton might 
limber up. By a rather involved process 




KNOW S I BLAME YOU FOR WANTIN TO STAY 



of reasoning Driscoll at last arrived at 
the conclusion that he would be doing 
Mary Baker a kindness, an unadulter- 
ated kindness, if he adopted her. 

He took her to dinner again that 
night, and there unfolded his plan. It 



included a sumptuous apartment, silken 
raiment, and — himself, smiling into her 
eyes, handsome beyond belief. 

Mary Baker was an unutterable little 
fool. And she was infatuated by the 
only man she had ever 
met outside of Johnny 
Applebloom and John- 
ny's very similar con- 
freres. She looked a bit 
frightened, a bit per- 
plexed and bewildered, 
but she nodded assent. 
Driscoll leaned across 
the table. His blue eyes 
blazed with a strange 
fire. He squeezed her 
little, cold fingers with 
his very hot ones. "You 
darling!" he rasped; "by 
gad — you beautiful dar- 
ling!" 

For an unreal week 
they bought — bought 
endlessly — clothes and 
furniture and jewels, and 
a. duck of a Stutz bear- 
cat for Mary's own use, 
and many other extrava- 
gances, and at last it was 
all complete — the apart- 
ment on the Drive, with 
its warm richness of 
rose Du Barry, its low 
lights and breathless 
roses, its slant-eyed, at- 
tentive Jap, its perfume, 
its soft, thick rugs. 
Mary stood within it, 
enthroned, the mistress 
of it all. Her little, un- 
developed brain strug- 
gled to comprehend. 
She was dazed by it all. 
She felt as tho presently 
she must awake — to the 
stiff, awkward Swiss cur- 
tains, flapping starchily 
at her windows ; to the 
trim, shiny matting un- 
der her shrinking feet ; to the chill water 
in the chill white basin on her wash- 
stand. Those things were realities; 
these things — why, these — these were — 
well, what were they? 

Upon the night they took possession 



56 



A GIRL'S FOLLY 



they gave a party. "I want my friends 
to know yon," Kenneth said, as they 
stood together within its portals for the 
first time. ''And I want you to know 
them." 

A deft and somewhat solicitous maid 
dressed Mary's waving, golden hair and 
slipped a white cobweb of a dress over 
her shoulders. Mary thought the girl 
looked sorry for her. She did not know 
why, yet she felt that it was quite right 
she was to be felt sorry for. When she 
went into the living-room Kenneth, in 
evening dress, was giving some last in- 
structions to the Jap. When he saw 
Mary that strange fire lit his eyes again. 
This time it was even stronger. Mary 
felt a little bit frightened. She had the 
silliest, babiest wish for Johnny Apple- 
bloom — dear, safe Johnny Applebloom! 
Safe! That was it, she thought crazily; 
oh, so safe! 

Driscoll took her in his arms. It was 
the first time. Somehow or other, it 
wasn't half so ecstatic as the books made 
it — half as heavenly as those departed 
Ruralton dreams. And something 
thudded against her unresponsive breast 
— crazily, wil